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Anyone with a hearing loss/wear hearing aids?

Discussion in 'Allopathic' started by cetona, May 28, 2009.

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  1. cetona

    cetona

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    I will be entering medical school this upcoming fall and am beginning to feel a bit nervous about the fact that I have a hearing loss and wear hearing aids. Has anyone else here gone through this, and what kind of difficulties did you encounter? I'm not really worried about how it will impact my schoolwork or social life, as I got through undergrad just fine, but I'm more worried about how it might impact the clinical side of things, such as using a stethoscope. I've talked to my audiologist about the stethoscope issue, but is there anything else that was made difficult by the use of hearing aids? Thanks for any advice.
  2. sarahl86

    sarahl86

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    I'm not D/HH but have a few friends in healthcare who are. Look into digital stethoscopes -- either ones that will hook up straight to your hearing aids or one with a display depending on the degree of your hearing loss. Your dependence on lipreading may also present additional challenges during clinical rotations when people are wearing masks, but this IMO is nothing that can't be worked with.
  3. Mr hawkings

    Mr hawkings Senior Member

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    There is a 2nd year resident in the hospital i work at who is completely deaf so obvioulsy it can be done clinically.

    As to the social aspects, thats entirely up you.
  4. sarahl86

    sarahl86

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  5. Slow

    Slow

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    lalala
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  6. DrMom

    DrMom Official Mom of SDN Administrator SDN Senior Moderator

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    I've got an autoimmune hearing loss. The first time I really had a problem was on my surgery rotation when I couldn't read lips...and voices were muffled with masks. Ugh! Most of the time it is no more challenging than everyday life. I'd recommend an amplified stethoscope, though. There are multiple brands out there.
  7. theman1990

    theman1990 Junior Member

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    I'm half deaf in my right ear courtesy of head trauma and I don't, but a friend in my class wears his regularly and I don't think most people even notice. Look into the electronic stethoscopes, too...
  8. Aesculapius

    Aesculapius Junior Member

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    I'm an MSI, have moderate hearing loss and use CIC aiads. I haven't figured out 100% my strategy yet, but so far, I have been using a good Littman Cardiology stethoscope and just taking out my hearing aids and putting them in my pocket when needed. I do have an electronic scope, made by Cardionics (E-Scope) with headphones, but I do not like the sound quality very much, and it's also not as convenient to carry around (can't just drape it over your shoulders). I'll let you know if I come up with any good insights other than that.

    By the way, how much hearing loss do you have?
  9. vasca

    vasca En la era postpasambre

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    Luuuuucky for having hearing aids! I don't hear that well myself (NEVER EVER come sneaking at me from behind when I'm sitting down writing or doing something because I can't hear you coming at me and NEVER do it as a joke, IT'S NOT FUNNY). I was insanly close to become funny puddy last year once because a car I couldn't hear almost hit me.

    With the aids people get the idea that you have a medical problem and people with a minimum degree of decency will never ever be mean to you for it. You aren't using stethoscopes every 5 seconds of your life either. I spend most of my non patient/non lunch time writing paperwork on a typewriter which obvously won't need good hearing, just good mechanography skills.

    It's people like me with borderline hearing disability that aren't deaf enough to wear hearing aids (I can't afford 'em either so what's the point anyways?) that have problems because people instead of being considerate and speaking more clearly (If I talk to people solo and they speak clearly I'll always understand them, it's when people chatter in groups where the sound isn't very intelligible), people have made fun of me (DOCTORS eeh, remember that) and one doctor that is known at my job for being a bit of a jerk to everyone sneered at me because I want to spend my money on a trip to Cancun instead of spending yet another vacations locked in my house doing virtually nothing of use and spending the money on hearing aids (when ironically I should be getting them free theoretically because of my job status.. but no "official" insurance number on paper makes me a sort of void in the universe laws of medical care).

    People have suggested me to get my hearing tested again to see if it has gotten worse, but those tests cost some good cash, and so that I get told I have ADHD ike the last time, why bother?

    I've even lost friendships with superior doctors because I got angry they made jokes and pranks about my hearing disability. Doctors can be really insensitive people VERY OFTEN. Ironic the next minute they do an insensitive prank an you they are telling in all seriousness to strangers a patient died.

    I won't even mention about my joint problems, some people think I'm faking that one. Yeah, damaged right knee from sport injuries? Gotta be fake. I can dislocate my left shoulder whenever I feel like it (it even dislocates when I don't want it too!!). Gotta be fake too.

    Doctors aren't the sugary coated gods of compassion you thought they were when you entered med school.
  10. cetona

    cetona

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    My hearing loss ranges from about 35 db in the lower frequencies to about 55 in the higher frequencies. I am in the process of trying out a new pair of hearing aids right now, I got my last pair before I entered college so they are getting a bit worn out and outdated. The current pair that I am testing has the capability to connect with an electronic stethoscope and send the sounds directly through my hearing aids so I don't have to take them out, but I am not sure the sound quality is as good as it could be. I might just end up taking my hearing aids out and using an amplified stethoscope.
  11. Aesculapius

    Aesculapius Junior Member

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    I didn't even know they had that sort of technology. I would definitely go for that, if you could. What model hearing aid/stethoscope would you be using?
  12. defrunner

    defrunner I'm Greased Up

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    Hey, just happened to see this post... didn't realize there were so many deaf/hard of hearing students. I'm profoundly hearing-impaired myself, and have just finished up my first year in a Chicago med school.

    The stethoscope was a pretty big issue for me.. I went with a Cardionics E-scope because it seemed to get pretty good reviews, and bought the corresponding headphones to go with it... which was merely acceptable in terms of sound quality, but the headphones are very conspicuous and since I wear behind-the-ear hearing aids, there was also a great deal of feedback, which meant I had to lower the volume on my hearing aids to try to get it under control. However, I've recently found that I can connect the stethoscope directly to my FM system that I use in class, which makes the sound better and cuts out the headphones as the middleman.

    As far as class goes, I use transcription and the aforementioned FM system, but overall, I wouldn't really rate the classroom experience as being much different than what you have had already. It is a great deal of information you're about to absorb, obviously, so just do your best to keep up... the hearing limitation meant (for me, at least) that I rely on mostly reading as my way of learning, as opposed to listening. The FM system is good, but since transcription is slightly delayed, I really can't do both in the classroom.

    The clinical years may be a problem, as far as communicating with the patients and using phones. I can get around the phone system by asking someone else to help me, and by using text messaging. Communication with the patients -- I'm just trying my best to practice as often as I can, and will always ask a patient to repeat themselves if I don't understand something (they're usually understanding people). Surgery will be tough, with the masks... one idea is to potentially set up a computer program using the physicians' dictation program (which recognizes their voice and speech pattern) so that this may be set up in the OR.... but it's just an idea right now.

    AMPHL seems to be an OK site, but I haven't really gotten much from it... not a very high-traffic site, or at least, there aren't really many deaf people in medicine checking on it every day.

    The main things: be sure to ask for help when you need it... don't try to be a hero and do everything on your own. Talk to the professors or course directors about their teaching styles if you can. Also, recognize your limitations and make sure you have a backup plan in place. Congratulations on getting into med school, but don't let up -- it will be tougher than for the types of people that can sit back and absorb what people say.

    I'd like to be in touch with anyone that's interested. Send me an email: [email protected].
  13. SandyChelsey

    SandyChelsey

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    .I know about The Hearing Fix rejuvenation product which provides hearing loss treatment to improve hearing and recovers hearing loss. It may be helpful for you. I think you should try for that..

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