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clinical psychology HPSP

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by marylene, Feb 3, 2008.

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  1. paramour

    paramour

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    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    Check out Upcoming Conferences/Workshops. I also posted your original post there, where you may receive more responses. Not too sure everyone checks out the HPSP thread unless they're interested in HPSP related issues.
  2. Programmer06

    Programmer06 Here4U

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    Hey, have they got you going yet with your payments and so forth. They JUST finished my paperwork last week, but I still have not seen a dime yet.
  3. american red

    american red

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    Yes, my payments (tuition + stipend) have been brilliant for about a year. Reimbursement for books takes a few weeks. Well worth it. My quality of life is great as a result. Thank you American people for your taxes :).
  4. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    Don't worry, they will get their money back and then some... but it's absolutely worth it.

    Mark
  5. american red

    american red

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    Certainly they will get their money's worth.

    But, the national average pay for a psychologist is not higher then what my pay will be as a CPT. This is NOT the case for an MD as an MD makes way more as a civilian. But MD's are lame anyways :).

    My total financial package is probably higher overall than a civilian with free health care and some salary being tax-free. It does not matter, I'm not doing it for the money and neither should ANYONE else. Originally, I was, but cog. dissonance is one bad mutha :).

    I have a near guaranteed APA internship plus a great job for 3 years after. Which of your colleagues at school can say the same? Remember the economy is tough for everyone right now. Also, I will be rewarded by treating the most thankful, well-deserving patients in the world, AND their families!

    Haha, wondering if I'm a recruiter yet?

    Oh yeah. I almost forgot. I will spend a year baking in the sun or getting blown up in afghanistan/iraq. NOTHING is free.
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2008
  6. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    As a USUHS student, I can appreciate all of the above. I make O-2 (LTJG) this year and will be over 10 years in service. O-2 and 10 years TIS is not too bad to live on.

    As to which of my colleagues can say the same thing? Ummm, all of them... we're all at USUHS and military.

    Mark
  7. american red

    american red

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    Most definitely brother. Most of that was actually written for the benefit of those who are not "in the know."

    So you can retire in 10 years?

    How many psychologists does USUHS produce per year? Whats the quality of the training/ professors? Would you like to teach there one day? I might.
  8. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    We produce 2-5 Military Psychologists per year. We also produce a few civilian Med Psych and Clinical Med Psych Students each year. Output of actual researchers from the program is slow but steady. The civilian students add a lot to the program and are generally quite accomplished. The competition for the 2-3 civilian slots offered each year is fierce. This years crop of civilian students includes graduates from Harvard, American University, and McGill. Last year we got students from UNC, Cornell, and one other program I can't remember (I want to say University of Maryland.)

    Quality of the training, I would say it's moderately high, but the pace is ridiculously fast. In and Out in 4 years (only for military students, the civilians take longer), that's the only negative aspect to the training, how fast it is. However, it seems quite thorough and we compare well with others from rigorous programs. Seems that we have a very good reputation.

    The professors, well, in a word: Awesome. We have fantastic professors! Top notch faculty from respected institutions and labs from around the country. The history and lineage of the department is really extraordinary.

    I wouldn't be qualified to be faculty there. Seriously, they look for faculty with super strong research programs and incredible academic credentials. As far as teaching a class, that is possible and I would welcome the opportunity to do so. Several alumni have taught there from time to time and it's almost always a rewarding experience. As T/A's we often get the chance to lecture or teach as well. There are spots for 1 or 2 military faculty members and the bar is a little lower for those positions, but the full time faculty slots are incredibly tough to get. I can't tell you how many people have been interviewed for the current open slot and all of them have been pretty stellar.

    Yes, I get to retire in 10 years should I decide that I am not having enough fun. I will stay until 2018 minimum and 2028 if I like it.

    Mark
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2008
  9. american red

    american red

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    Whats the dif. b/w med psych and clinical med psych? Where are you at in the process? 10 years is a long minimum assuming you dont like it from the beginning :).
  10. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    Med psych is not a clinical degree (e.g. no internship, no licensure) You leave that program to become a researcher and academic. That is the focus of the med psych program. The clinical med psych civilian students take a course load that incorporates all the clinical program plus the extra work in medical psychology to churn out a researcher who is capable of being licensed.

    The military students are considered pure clinical psych students with a smaller focus on the research, really it's a balanced program for us military students. As you know the insiders guide rates programs on a Likert scale from 1 to 7. 1 being nothing but research, and 7 being nothing but clinical work. The programs we have are a 4 (Military Clinical Psych), a 2 or 3 (Med/Clinical Psych), and a 1 (Medical Psych) on that scale. The only option for the military students is Military Clinical Psychology.

    I am in year 2 of the program. It's a great program, but enjoying it... that's another matter altogether. Sometimes it feels like you are surviving it, because it's so fast and so intense. The faculty is very supportive though and realizes that we are being pushed pretty hard.... but they don't let up! This year is harder than the last... and rumor has it that next year is harder than this year.

    You're right 10 years is a long minimum investment, you have to be sure the military is right for you... I guess as far as mistakes go, I can't imagine anyone really hating things that badly in this program. Especially since they carefully screen all the applicants, it's not easy to get into this program as a civilian. Only 1 civilian made it in to the military program this year, and 2 the year before that... one of which (me) was prior service. I mean the only real difference is I don't have to decide what to wear in the morning and I need to work out on a regular basis... which is what I am going to do right now.

    Mark
  11. StacyTXLPC

    StacyTXLPC

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    Dumb question about licensure....many posts have mentioned the service committment, time to licensure, and such. I am a Texas resident. If I go to USUHS or use the HPSP, can I choose ANY state in which to be licensed? I know many states require additional post doc supervision. As a military member, can I apply for licensure in the state of my choosing? or does it have to be my state of residence? Or where I'm stationed? etc...

    Thanks
  12. StacyTXLPC

    StacyTXLPC

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    I've already been in contact with the local Navy folks re: USUHS. Today, I contacted an Army recruiter re: HPSP.

    When I told the recruiter I needed info about the HPSP, his response was, "So, are you already a nurse?"

    Gotta love it. :mad:
  13. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    Here is the deal as I know it... In the Army and Navy, they (Col Crow and CAPT Petrillo) have stated that licensure in any state you wish is acceptable. On the Army side of things, your payback commitment clock does not start until you are licensed, Navy is considering that but currently the payback clock starts when you leave internship and arrive at your first duty station. The Army (from what I heard) was having problems with people not getting licensed and thus not being deployable.

    So yes you can pick any state, however, if you get licensed in a state that allows you to get licensed more quickly you will be eligible for the $5k/year specialty pay that comes with being licensed. Additionally, those who have ABPP certification are entitled up to another 6k/year (depending on years in service). There are a bunch of things in the pipeline to make Military Psychology more financially attractive than it has been in the past.

    The official line is that they will allow you to get certified in any state you like, but expect them to push for you to get licensed as soon as possible, as the goal is to have you deployable and able to practice independently as soon as possible.

    Mark

    PS - Good luck
  14. BDuPre

    BDuPre

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    Hello all,

    I'm getting ready to apply to clinical psych. programs and the HPSP from the Army. My question is: how many years does the scholarship cover? I've heard 2-3 years. So, if they only cover 2-3 years, and I take 5-6 to complete my PhD, how would it work out? Would I still have to do 45 days of active duty for the years that they do not cover? I'm kind of confused on how it all works out right now.

    Thanks!
  15. hugs

    hugs

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    Hi everyone,
    I just had a question on the HPSP Scholarship for the medical field. I'm strongly considering a Master's Degree in Psychology but the emphasis would be Licensed Professional Counselor and Licensed Marital Family Therapist. I know that for the HPSP scholarship you have to have a letter of acceptance from an accredited school to pursue the Master's Degree, and after you graduate you owe the military some time back due to the HPSP scholarship..what I'm unsure about is to be licensed you have to have 2 years of supervised experience after receiving the Master's Degree, and I didn't know if the military provides this experience after I receive the Master's Degree or if I have to have the Master's Degree and then do the 2 years of supervised experience and then join the military, thanks in advance. I also would like to get in contact with a Army Health Recruiter, I live in Lawton, Ok and I'm having a hard time finding one...I don't know if it matters, but I have 6 years prior service-Active Duty-on the Military Intel side...and I was honorably discharged...

    Also I apologize if any of these questions are already answered in the forum, oh and one other question what is the process like to even apply for the HPSP program, thanks...
  16. hugs

    hugs

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    Had another question, I was curious on rank upon finishing the Master's Degree, would I come in as a 2nd Lit, or a Captain on active duty?, again thanks in advance, the service I'm interested in is Army...
  17. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    Usually (at least in the Navy this is how we roll) you get rank based on degree. B.A. or B.S. = 2nd Lt (0-1), M.A. or M.S. = 1st Lt (0-2), Ph.D., D.D.S., or M.D. = Capt (0-3).

    Mark

    PS - Your 6 years means you qualify for E pay... (0-1E, 0-2E, 0-3E) you get paid as your rank with 6 years and an extended pay cap.
  18. justme08

    justme08

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    I'm currently trying to work out some alternative education routes and am hoping for some input. I've been pursuing the prereqs for a BSN program, 4.0 in all these classes thus far. My intent for the BSN was to immediately enter a psychiatric NP program. My snag, due to the economy my family (kids) need me earning money and I don't know that they can make it through 2 years of the nursing program, academic and clinicals, without me working as I am now, and I don't claim to be superwoman:)

    My original school goal was counseling psych, but I don't think that would net enough after school costs so I went this route. I'm interested in psychology and psychiatry. I originally ruled out med school due to age and expense. I've looked at PA school as well, but becoming an NP was cheaper.

    I looked at USUHS and it looks like I'm already too old (34) for their med school.

    I see that the ARMY has an HPSP for Psych NP but it only pays for the grad portion, the only way I'd go that route then is to get a BA in psych or something, and then apply for Direct Entry programs.

    I need fto ind out more about HPSP programs. It looks like they have clinical psych and med school.

    Any other ideas or routes you guys can throw out there would be much appreciated. :love:

    I'm just trying to do my homework now because I'd really hate to start my nursing program and not be able to finish or perform well due to the necessity to work fulltime.

    Thank you.
  19. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    I believe you can get a waiver for age up to at least age 42, I would be surprised if you could not. I am not even sure you need a waiver. I would have to check.

    I know I was accepted at 40 to the Clinical Psych program without an age waiver, I had more problems getting them to waiver my lasik surgery.

    Mark
  20. justme08

    justme08

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    Thank you. That gives me hope there. I have an email into USUHS as well as the Army and Airforce re: HPSP.

    I had another question that may be more on the MD side, but do you know how the military is about specialities? Meaning I'd want to be a psychiatrist if I went the MD route. I realize I will have rotations in everything. I'm interested in medical issues and have no problem with my labs thus far, so that's not a problem. But I know I don't want to be for example, a surgeon, so if I went with the military for funding could I be forced out of being a psychiatrist and into being a surgeon?

    If that's the case I'd definately go with Clinical Psych.
  21. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    Psychiatry is an easier to get slot, the surgical slots are usually the highly contested slots. You could be forced into a specialty that you don't want, but I don't see that happening with psychiatry. This, of course, is better asked of the military medical students who have experience with this process.

    Clinical Psych as 2 available slots per year. The medical school, 170 or so. While I would not want to dissuade you from applying to the clinical psychology program, the only 2 military slots open to civilians are the 2 navy slots. There are civilian slots too, but they receive lesser stipends and funding is only guaranteed for the first 3 years IIRC.

    Mark
  22. justme08

    justme08

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    Thanks for all your help. :thumbup:
  23. hugs

    hugs

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    Hi Everyone,

    After looking over the posts again, I have a few questions about the HPSP program for the army and Clinical Psychology. I am about to apply for a Master's degree in Psychology with the emphasis in either Counseling or Clinical Psychology, I'm about 99 percent sure that I will be admitted, however for the requirements for the HPSP program, it states, that
    A) you have to have an acceptance letter into a graduate school, Is graduate school the same thing as a Master's Degree?
    B) It States that you have to have a bachelor's degree in Psychology or related field, my bachelors degree is in Information Technology Management
    C) Is the HPSP only set up for people who are obtaining their Doctorate Degree.

    I was hoping to apply for the HPSP upon starting my Master's, and then obtaining the clinical experience in the army, and obtaining licensure while doing the internship in the army

    Hopefully someone can clarify these points, thanks in advance, Angela
  24. PrisonPsych

    PrisonPsych

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    In order to practice in the military, you must have a doctorate. So you would need to have a doctorate degree in either clinical or counseling psych.
  25. AMEDD Officer

    AMEDD Officer

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    A quick but critical update to this post: For the last couple of years the Army has been meeting all of its Clinical Psychology scholarship and internship recruiting goals, with plenty of people left over on the alternate lists, so the scholarship is very competitive now. Those who just barely make the minimum criteria will NOT be selected unless they happen to be prior service with a phenomenal service history and lots of big-name military letters of recommendation. You must be one of the best among your peers in school to have a realistic chance of selection.
  26. AMEDD Officer

    AMEDD Officer

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    You must be admitted to an APA accredited PhD or PsyD program in clinical or counseling psychology for the scholarship.
  27. AMEDD Officer

    AMEDD Officer

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    Military medical students match for residencies just like civilian students, but at least speaking from an Army perspective, the match rates for HPSP scholarship recipients are almost always better than civilian match rates. Therefore, you have a better chance of getting psychiatry through the Army than you would in applying for a civilian match... but it is still a match process, and not a guaranteed specialty.

    As for the psychology slots available, it varies from year to year, but the Army has a great deal more (for uniformed interns) than the two that were mentioned in the previous post. I don't know which branch of service has only two, but it is not the Army. For psychology interns there is also a match process, but if you are accepted to Army clinical psychology HPSP, you have an extremely high likelihood of getting one of the Army's five internship sites (each of which admit about 6 interns per year). For an Army HPSP student not to match to an Army site, they would have to really screw something up in their last couple years of their doctoral program or else be an absolutely terrible interviewee.
  28. AMEDD Officer

    AMEDD Officer

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    My two cents of advice on this would be to figure out which route you really want to go personally and professionally, and THEN figure out the best way to pay for it. Feel free to disagree, but these fields are not interchangeable, and one is going to carry a stronger passion and commitment for you than the others, so find which one that is, and then conquer the other obstacles. Age probably won't be a big hurdle for the waiver if you get started quickly and have the other requisites for a strong application.
  29. AMEDD Officer

    AMEDD Officer

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    After completing you doctorate (or at least everything but internship), you would enter active duty as a Captain.
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2009
  30. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    Sir,

    I was referring to the available slots at USUHS, currently the Army has 2 clinical psychology slots available through USUHS for the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program (both of which will apparently go unfilled for 2010.) These are NOT intership slots but slots for the Ph.D. program. I apologize if I was not clear in that post that I was referring to availability for Ph.D. training or M.D. Training at USUHS. The USUHS program is not an internship program, it is a college that offers Medical and Graduate Degrees that in many cases lead to internships or residency.

    Obviously the Army accepts more than 2 interns per year, as mentioned in previous posts, the Army has the largest number of internship sites for placing people who have either finished their degree through USUHS, HPSP, or traditional civilian programs. The service breakdown is Army with 5 available locations that are competed for through the APPIC match system, the USAF offers 3 sites (Andrews, Wright-Patterson, Lackland) through APPIC and the Navy has 3 sites but all USUHS and HPSP Navy students will go to Portsmouth and civilian applicants will compete for either Bethesda or San Diego through APPIC.


    Mark
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2009
  31. justme08

    justme08

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    Thank you AMEDD Officer, for taking the time to address my post. I know what I want most, and that's psychology; however, money in my life due to my responsibilities, is equally important. :)

    I have made a decision for now that I will obtain a Bachelor's in Psychology next year and then apply to USUHS, and apply to funded PhD programs, then if I go that route apply for HPSP after my first year. Should that not work at all for some reason then it's back to either a master's entry NP program or PA school. I think that should cover all contingencies :xf: But now that the military option has been presented both my husband and I are actually excited. Maybe we're odd ducks that way:)
  32. justme08

    justme08

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    Mark, does that mean that USUHS will have more than the 2 Navy slots available in the future?
  33. EverHopeful

    EverHopeful

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    If you are applying for Fall of 2011, you'll be my competition! :p
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2010
  34. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    It is unclear whether the Navy will add more slots, but the Army MAY (and I repeat MAY) open the competition to civilian students interested in pursuing an Army career.

    I expect USUHS to remain fairly competitive for the Navy slots. Last year's admitted students were very impressive. I actually am probably the least competitive student of the Navy students currently in the program, but all very bright and capable students and I am fortunate to have such really great peers. It's funny going from undergraduate where you are used to standing out to a program where you are just average and you're surrounded by a bunch of people much smarter than you.


    Mark
  35. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    LOL, they may not be your competition, they may just be your classmate! USUHS is a completely non-competitive atmosphere regarding your studies in the program. It's you and your cohort against the curriculum, and the curriculum is pretty aggressive. :)

    Mark
  36. EverHopeful

    EverHopeful

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    I am just thinking about the admissions process. Like you said, there are only two civilian slots. :scared: Those are tough odds (as are most grad programs unfortunately). My goal is just to survive the process with at least one acceptance and a sliver of my sanity.
  37. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    Actually there are 2-3 "civilian" slots, and 2 Navy slots that accept civilians. The "civilian" slots are just that, regular non-military civilians, $29k stipend and no tuition fees... those are the most competitive slots at USUHS in the psychology program (it's the dual track medical/clinical psychology track or medical track for the "civilian" slots) no payback or strings attached.

    Mark
  38. justme08

    justme08

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    That is good news, potentially more chances for me and EverHopeful here.

    Not trying to blow sunshine, IMO you represent the program well. You also always seem willing to share, which I assume also speaks to the level of cooperation among the students you are with.
  39. EverHopeful

    EverHopeful

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    Sorry I wasn't clear. I am planning to apply for the clinical PhD with military emphasis. I am not really interested in the other program (as awesome as the stipend sounds). I'm glad the one I'll be applying to is less competitive! I will take whatever help I can get.
  40. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    Thank you...

    Actually, despite its flaws (and all programs have flaws) it is a great program and I am very fortunate to be a part of it. The atmosphere is collaborative and collegial, the faculty are generally very supportive, and the program is geared for success. The other students (especially your upperclassmen) are invaluable and key to making it through the program. In that respect this program is incredible. Each individual cohort has it's own vibe and personality, some more collaborative and organized than others.

    Mark

    PS - Good luck to both of you when you apply. I hope you have the opportunity to interview and attend.
  41. AMEDD Officer

    AMEDD Officer

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    Sounds like a great plan. If you don't get USUHS, and go HPSP instead, you should be able to cover enough of those first couple years with a combination of scholarships and loans to make it viable regardless of family and income situations, so I wish you the very best of luck in your applications.
  42. AMEDD Officer

    AMEDD Officer

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    Good info. I suppose I thought you were referring to HPSP because that is the topic of this discussion, but it's good to make sure we have the USUHS information on this post too, so anyone interested in a PhD (vs. PsyD) knows that this is an option for the most highly competitive applicants. Thanks for fleshing that out.
  43. Rgugwor

    Rgugwor

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    I had a quick question about joining the military and being a civilian contractor for clinical psychology. I am currently an undergrad junior. I spoke to a couple of people that served in the military (Navy and Marines) and they told me that being a civilian contractor is the best way (and better pay). My question is how should I begin the process (in being in the military versus civilian contractor). Which is better?
  44. jnett8

    jnett8

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    Are you active duty already Everhopeful? Im confused on this USUHS clinical phd for military only. Do you have to be active before you even apply, or can you join the service upon acceptance into the program? If you're a civillian going into this application process Everhopeful, I may have a lot more questions for you :)
  45. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Moderator Emeritus

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    I think it was Markp that said to only join the military if you want to be in the military, because there is a lot more to it than "just another job". Many 9-5 civlian jobs can be compartmentalized and just be what the person does to make a living, though committing to a position in the military is as much of a lifestyle as it is a job. It seems that the happiest people in the military are those who want to serve in that environment by doing a job, as opposed to those who are doing the job and it happens to be in a military environment.

    From my understanding, you'd make more if you are in the military (housing allowance, different leave benefits, different pay scale, etc), compared to being a civilian psych contractor. However, you'd also be committing to a number of years of service, which may not work for some people. A couple of my friends are psychologists in the military, and they have said great things about the training, benefits, opportunities, etc....but they went in wanting a military lifestyle, and they spent a significant amount of time deployed on a boat. They told me that they have some flexibility of where they are stationed state-side, but you are committed to serving wherever you are needed for your deployment.

    More about the money....there are still some very lucrative contract jobs out there, though they are the exception and not the rule. If money is a motivating factor for you, go into I/O Psychology, which tends to do more work in the business sector. Only work in the military if that is the population you want to work with, and consider the $ and extra benefits as a bonus.
  46. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    That depends, but I think after counting my tax free income, I was doing better than civilians making $110k. My wife who works a "regular job" and took home about $72000 per year after taxes. I take home just over $77000 per year as a student. Although I make "less", I take home slightly more per month. So unless these contractors are pulling in well in excess of $110k, I think I am pretty happy as a active duty military service member.

    Mark

    PS - Her and I have the same withholdings and tax situation, so it's a pretty far comparison.
  47. jnett8

    jnett8

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    I understand many on this forum are doing the CPIP in conjunction with the HPSP scholarsip, but I am wondering if the CPIP offers any benefits to someone who did not earn the scholarship but applies for it? (Besides the obvious of getting the chance to work at one of the militarys medical facilities)

    Does this program offer any loan payback or stipends in return for service if you are awarded the internship?

    Trying to figure out ALL of my options here in my pursuit to serve as a clin. psychologist in the army.
  48. 73BARMYPgsp

    73BARMYPgsp Post Doc

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    I don't think you can get SLRP until you are eligible to extend your committment (around the milddle of the 2nd year). CPIP or not.
  49. 73BARMYPgsp

    73BARMYPgsp Post Doc

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    It's all about time/rank baby. Mark and I have both racked up some time which on active duty is the key. My peers came in as 0-3's with 0 zero years time in service, whereas I had 7 years. Big difference.
  50. Markp

    Markp Post-Internship (ABD)

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    Yep, I am now O-2 over 12. :)

    Mark

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