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Do graduates from schools like chiropractor, PA need residency?

Discussion in 'Topics in Healthcare' started by atethesun, Jul 2, 2012.

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  1. atethesun

    atethesun

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    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    Just wondering or do they go straight into the workforce?
  2. J-Rad

    J-Rad Moderator Emeritus

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    This doesn't really have anything to do with Medical residencies or residents themselves so I am moving this thread.

    To answer: mostly chiropractors and PAs do not do residencies and go directly into the workforce. I'll let someone with personal expertise/experience of chiropractic like facetguy address any details, but I know that some chiros do "residency" training in chiropractic neurology and chiropractic radiology. I've no idea how common that is.

    PAs most commonly also go into the workforce, though are often in a sort of OJT training phase in the earlier years after graduation from PA school. There are a few PA residencies, but I don't think it's a common thing to do. Maybe one of our PAs can speak to it.

    And before someone complains that I should have put this thread in the clinicians' forum, I know there are some current/former chiros who post here regularly and they don't really fall under that topic category, so TIH vice Clinician's was a 50/50 choice. I chose here.
  3. cdmguy

    cdmguy Loveable, fleas and all

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    J,

    Not only isn't residence required to practice chiropractic, there is no residency for general chiropractic available. Most post graduate training consists of weekend diplomate courses with no clinical experience. However, these diplomates don't entitle the holder to any special privileges, but are mainly used for marketing to give the impression of specialized knowledge and to learn new treatment methods, much of it quackery. Very few DCs complete diplomates because they take so long. I have seen diplomates available in: pediatrics, neurology. orthopedics, rehabilitation, radiology, internist and forensics. The rehabilitation, radiology and orthopedics dips are the most evidence based. Peds, neuro and internist are very quacky in my opinion.
  4. cdmguy

    cdmguy Loveable, fleas and all

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    J,

    Not only isn't residence required to practice chiropractic, there is no residency for general chiropractic available. Most post graduate training consists of weekend diplomate courses with no clinical experience. However, these diplomates don't entitle the holder to any special privileges, but are mainly used for marketing to give the impression of specialized knowledge and to learn new treatment methods, much of it quackery. Very few DCs complete diplomates because they take so long. I have seen diplomates available in: pediatrics, neurology. orthopedics, rehabilitation, radiology, internist/diagnosis, nutrition and forensics. The rehabilitation, radiology and orthopedics dips are the most evidence based. Peds, neuro and internist are very quacky in my opinion. The only dips that have an in house residency are radiology (non ICA) and diagnosis. These are teaching residencies and are only offered at a few mixer schools. Straight schools (the majority) are anti-evidence based practice and do not offer them.
  5. facetguy

    facetguy

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    So now you are against chiropractors continuing their education so that they may learn more, stay abreast of the latest, become better, and be in a position to better serve their patients?

    I thought, according to you, chiropractic colleges don't do a good enough job of educating their students? According to your line of thinking, ALL chiropractors should therefore be doing lots of post-grad education and training, perhaps be required to do so.

    You can't have it both ways.

    Do you see how you are blinded by your anti-chiro bias? You don't make any sense.

    What is wrong with a DC wanting to become more knowledgeable about nutrition, or wanting to become better at reading MRIs, or wanting to learn more about active rehab, etc.? Answer: there's NOTHING wrong with this. When other healthcare professionals do this, you applaud. When chiros do this, you claim it's bad because it doesn't provide DCs with special privileges?

    As always, you will try to contrive any argument against the chiropractic profession. The reality is your arguments never make sense and are obviously laden with bitterness and bias.
  6. cdmguy

    cdmguy Loveable, fleas and all

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    But these programs aren't equivalent.

    >So now you are against chiropractors continuing their education so that they may learn more, stay abreast of the latest, become better, and be in a position to better serve their patients?

    That's a red herring. I never made a statement one way or the other, just pointed out that there are differences in objectives and content among different diplomats. In fact, since I pointed out that some diplomats were more evidence based that would be an argument for chiropractors doing them; especially if they wanted more coursework in those subjects. However the obvious problem would be that without a residency portion these DCs wouldn't get any clinical experience so their education would be on par with a second year medical student-hardly impressive. Further, they wouldn't be supervised on practice and get to have the feedback to know when they made a mistake.

    To give readers a peek at how bizarre these programs can get, here are two:

    Chiropractic Neurology
    http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/index.php/chiropractic-neurology/
    http://www.chirobase.org/06DD/blindspot.html

    Chiropractic Pediatrics
    http://www.chirobase.org/06DD/ped.html
    http://www.chirobase.org/06DD/webster.html

    Clearly you are misleading readers to equate this crap with legitimate residencies; either that or you are so biased that you can't read any critical webpages and spot when they make good points against your chosen field.
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2012
  7. facetguy

    facetguy

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    I never said these programs equate with medical residencies. Of course they don't. Residents are completely immersed for 80 hours/week for at least several years.

    I simply said these programs provide a mechanism for practicing DCs (that is, people who already have successful practices...**coughunlikeyoucough**) to continue further their knowledge base. This isn't supposed to be the same model as a residency at all. Nice try.
  8. cdmguy

    cdmguy Loveable, fleas and all

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    Yes I know your successful practice- ripping off people by telling them they are curing osteoarthritis and preventing visceral diseases by adjusting nonexistent subluxations. Why else would you hide your real name? No thanks. There is a reason chiropractic utilization is only 7%, there is no DC section on SDN forums and for chiros having the lowest trust rating of all the health fields. Smart people know to stay the hell away from you quacks.
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2012

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