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Hpsp Faq

Discussion in 'Military Medicine' started by Homunculus, Apr 26, 2004.

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  1. elderjack21

    elderjack21

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    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    Stipend goes up to $1992/month starting July 1st, 2009. Yipee...still moving in the right direction.
  2. drcarter77

    drcarter77

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    does anybody know how difficult it is to transfer an HPSP offer from one school to another. Ie if I finally get my offer (my recruiter said it should be about a month from now) and then i get off a waitlist for a school I'd rather go to, how hard will it be to transfer the scholarship to the other school.
  3. Slevin

    Slevin

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    Let your recruiter know and they'll do the paperwork
  4. drcarter77

    drcarter77

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    is it not a huge deal then? and is it something i need to do significant work beforehand on. I have mentioned it as a possibility to my recruiter but it is likely something he wrote off as something he didn't have to worry about at the moment.
  5. El Chupacabra

    El Chupacabra Member

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    hey group,

    after calculating my loans and whatnot, I have started looking into HPSP. I am about to start my 3rd year of med school. I am taking out roughly $50k/year. If I did the HPSP program for my last two years of med school, what would my obligations be? There seems to be a lot of negativity about doing this for the money, which frankly, I am for the most part. That being said, "all" the other reasons really appeal to me as well, but when I totaled up what I will have paid after my 10 years of repayment, it scared the you know what outta me. Nevertheless, curious as to your thoughts. I do not know much about FAP either, so I am open to suggestions.
  6. TheGoose

    TheGoose

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    in your situation, the 'quickest' way out would be to do a 2 year HPSP scholarship (tuition paid for for 2 years and 2 years of a stipend....do NOT take the sign-on bonus), do an internship, and then immediately do a 2 year GMO tour. Then your active duty payback will be finished and you'll just have a bunch of years left on IRR (individual ready reserve).

    FAP is a different story that you can read up on your own
  7. drcarter77

    drcarter77

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    any other opinions on this?
  8. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member

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    If you were Navy, I would say submit a new academic year statement along with a letter that you would be attending a different school. All they would have to do is change the tuition contract you are on. Army should work in a similar fashion. HPSP is not accepting you based on the school you are attending and they certainly want you to attend the best school you can.

    Once school is started it becomes more difficult.
  9. freubr

    freubr

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    can someone explain the process by which you would apply to do a civ residency?
  10. tbucky

    tbucky

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    Just talked to my recruiter and he has it at $1998. Either way, it'll help that much more.
  11. MDLoves

    MDLoves

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    Is it way too late to apply to HPSP now for someone matriculating in August?
  12. ksc

    ksc

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    MDLoves - From what I can tell, it's never too late to apply to any of the HPSP programs, despite what the written deadlines may say. The USAF HPSP, for instance, had their last selections committee meet in April to decide on scholarship recipients, but even so, you can still fill out an application by contacting a recruitor for waitlist/ alternate consideration. Automatic acceptance is granted with a 3.5 GPA and a 29 MCAT; at that point a scholarship simply has to be made available.

    In the last few years, USAF has seen more applicants/scholarships than the other 2 branches. Your best bet is applying to Navy or Army for a slot (though feel free to do one for AF too).
  13. Exalya

    Exalya

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    So here's my issue. I do not have a problem serving in the military. I feel that serving would be doing a lot of good, and I would be happy to do it. I know how awful the system can be. My husband was in the infantry, so... yeah. We got shafted as much as a person could. I could live with that. I've lived in sub-par conditions below the poverty line all my life. The lack of shine in the military is 100% okay with me. Also, I will be matriculating (assuming I get in this cycle) at the age of 20. Spending a few years in the military will not hurt me, because I am not very old at all.

    But, if I could go without the HPSP, I would want to. Unfortunately I have no money. My family disowned me a long time ago. I have no one to cosign my loans, and although my credit is 'okay,' I could not sign a private student loan last semester although I tried. I don't really want a lot of loans to begin with (if I could get them). On the other hand, I really want freedom when picking a residency. I don't want to work during medical school... I've been working since I was 13 and I would really like to just be in school for once in my life.

    Do I have options besides HPSP? At all?
  14. elderjack21

    elderjack21

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    Official message from MODS which is the Army HPSP portal for all official information.



    Message Info

    Please Note: This message will be available from the Bulletin Board menu for future reference.

    Title: Stipend Increase
    Message: The annual stipend increase has been announced and stipend will be $1992.00 per month starting 1 July 2009.
    From: Arthur Covi
    Required: Yes
    Date Received: 4/29/2009
    Date Read: 4/29/2009
  15. ksc

    ksc

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    Exalya-

    I feel for you. Fortunately, you have your husband (and friends) there to support you, so I'm sure you'll be alright. There are other options besides HPSP, though if you're talking about the military here, there's no way you can avoid your active duty commitment. If you want the flexibility of choosing among strictly civilian residencies, then maybe you should consider FAP, a program that's also run by the military through which you'll be able to obtain stipends each year to pay for your living expenses and loans you took out during medical school. It's something you can look into at the residency level, and enables you to pursue a program in the civilian arena.

    In your situation though, I think the HPSP offers way more bang for your buck since you'll have your tuition, living expenses, and school-related expenses covered from day one, in addition to a nice sign-on bonus. Yes, you commit yourself to an Army residency, but they're good programs and towards the end you actually have more options available to you than your civilian counterparts in that you can choose between either civilian or military fellowships (assuming you want to specialize). If you don't want anything to do with the military, other programs that you may want to look into include physician shortage programs that target rural areas that are probably offered by your school and the one offered by the National Health Corp.

    Hope that helps.
  16. futuredoc30

    futuredoc30

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    Hello everyone,

    I am starting medical school this summer and considering the 3-yr HPSP (I wasn't accepted in time for this year's deadline). I am going with the Air Force and am trying to make sure I understand this.

    I am thinking I'll end up somewhere between an internist and an oncologist. I do not have a problem with doing my payback, but what I'm a bit confused about is this GMO / pulled from residency stuff. I have my Ph.D. , multiple publications, and will likely have a few more by the time med school is done as I will be doing some research and consulting with my old lab.

    Considering my background and assuming I work my tail off and do well in school, nail the boards, and get good exposure/networking in my rotations, I want to know if I have a fair chance of getting an internal medicine or hem/onc residency/fellowship.

    I guess my burning questions are:

    1. Is this GMO duty an unwritten reality that cannot be avoided?

    2. Is a military IM residency really that hard to match with? It seems to me this would be an attractive specialty for the AF to have on hand.

    3. Am I correctly understanding that I can put civilian deferment and multiple military hem/onc and IM locations for my match?

    4. Does anyone know anyone in military medicine that went through hem/onc that I could talk with?


    I guess I'm considering my worst case scenario that I would match IM with the military (not Hem/Onc), then do my payback, then decide if I want to go back to civilian fellowship at that point or continue as an internist. Again, I have no problem with deployment and paying back my obligation, a deal's a deal. I just want to know what's up with this GMO as it applies to the AF, and if I'm understanding the risks. Either way, I want to be a doctor, and I want to serve. I'm not sure about making a career out of it yet.

    Thanks,
  17. psychbender

    psychbender Cynical Member

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    If you select an IM residency, there is a very good liklihood of being able to skip the GMO bit, and go straight from internship through residency. In the Army, its is all but guaranteed, I believe in Navy a decent number of IM applicants still do GMO tours, but I thought I remember AF allowing straight through training for the most part. There are always post-match IM spots available in the Army, not sure about AF, but I don't imagine that it is exceptionally difficult to match into (and your research will net you a couple extra points for the JSGMEB).

    I'll leave the finer details of match and program ranking to someone in the AF, since every service does it differently. But, yes, you should be able to request a civilian deferral, and then rank the AF IM programs.
  18. futuredoc30

    futuredoc30

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    Thank you very much. That is all very good to hear. Take care.
  19. shwang3

    shwang3

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    I'm just wondering if anybody knows if one's criminal background makes one ineligible for HPSP candidacy. If not, what types of convictions would make one ineligible?
  20. drcarter77

    drcarter77

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    i've been waiting on hearing about selection for what seams like an eternity now. My recruiter said that I received my professional recommendation. Is that the big hurdle and the rest is just playing the waiting game, or do a lot of people who make it to getting a professional recommendation still end up not getting the scholarship? If it makes any difference I'm applying for a Navy scholarship
  21. prognosticator

    prognosticator

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    AAAahh that sounds all too familiar... So I went through all those steps with my recruiter and finally got a call. He said I was officially selected for a 4 year HPSP! Then he said he would send a letter of acceptance ASAP that I needed to sign... Anyway, three weeks went by with multiple attempts by me to contact him, then he calls yesterday and says my 4 yr migh actually be a THREE yEAR starting summer of 2010!!! He said some of the scholarships got downsized due to lack of funding. My registration for classes is in a month! He suggested I start applying for a loan for this year, so I applied but this sucks. I have to come up with a loan in like 3 weeks. Just wanted to give you a forewarning in case you haven't heard
    from your recruiter for awhile. I have always wanted to be a part of the military but this process has been really ridiculous. I'm beginning to reconsider my options since I haven't signed anything yet...
  22. ksc

    ksc

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    Drcarter77,

    I think the professional recommendation is an important hurdle to get across, but certainly doesn't guarantee you a scholarship if an insufficient number is available. I'd say you have the right idea - that the rest of it is a waiting game, so that all you can really do at this point is sit tight (I'm assuming you made it onto an OML list, unless you've heard back by now and were already commissioned). It's weird, but some branches of the military require the professional rec while others don't; in my experience, for instance, I was preparing to interview with an AF doc for my rec around the time that I received my acceptance for the Army's HPSP - one that didn't require that I interview with a doc at all.
  23. tbucky

    tbucky

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    What branch was this for? Also, did it change from a 4 to a 3 before you did your enrollment packet?
  24. squad41

    squad41

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    Gang:

    I really feel for all of you:

    Here's my story on Navy HPSP:

    Accepted to Med school 12/08
    All paperwork, including transcripts to rectuiter 3/09
    Professional rec. from a high ranking officer/doc 3/09
    Physical early 4/09- had to get waiver for high cholesterol (?)
    Waiver complete 5/09
    Told I was going the board for a decision by end of 5/09.

    Still no word. Recruiter is VERY difficult to get a hold of, doesn't return emails, voicemails, makes me feel like Im being annoying for wanting to know my file status.

    Now its June. Med school starts end of July. Still no decision.

    Latest update: My file is now going to the board (no explanation for the confusion with why I still dont have a decision) and should have a decision by next Friday.

    Can anyone out there please help me out with advice? This is starting to get ridiculous and I was really counting on getting that 20k sign on bonus to help w/ summer expenses. Furthermore, I need to get loans lined up if HPSP falls through. Worse yet, theres no way I can go to ODS now this summer, as med school is starting in 4.5 weeks.

    Please chime in boys and girls.....
  25. drcarter77

    drcarter77

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    well i doubt this is much encouragement but we have a near identical timeline, right down to the medical waivers and and recommendations, and I'm in the exact same position. Haven't heard anything and am getting pretty nervous as the Aug. 3 deadline to have my first semester of tuition in approaches. At least i'm not, and i guess neither are you, the only ones sitting around and playing the waiting game

    on a more positive note though at least from people i know who have done it and from what my recruiter said, not going to ODS before med school starts is not only not required but not particularly common. According to my recruiter most people don't go until after their first year.
  26. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member

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    You guys are probably waiting on the scroll. That is the OK from SecDef to appoint you as ENS. This can take 12+ weeks.
  27. squad41

    squad41

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    But shouldn't we at least hear if we have been selected or not in the interim?!?!?!? Also, 12 weeks!??!?? I'll be halfway through M1 by then! I was sent to the board in May, so who knows...


    Also, anyone know anything about a "GPA waiver." I was told I had to get a waiver for a low GPA; however, that it was just more paperwork, and should not interfere with my application or selection....Anyone care to chime in if theyve heard of this for HPSP?
  28. Perrotfish

    Perrotfish Has an MD in Horribleness

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    Just an FYI, if the service you're currently applying for is dragging it's feet, consider applying for a different service. I know that there were several people last year who tried for AF, had the AF tried to bait and switch them, and then scrambled into a Navy HPSP scholarship instead. I know someone in my school that went from Navy to AF HPSP for the same reason.

    You can even be up front with them. Just tell the new recruiter "if you can finish the paperwork before they do, I'll go with you guys". They're on a quota, they'll make it happen.

    Finally, be aware that at least for Navy (unless something changed this year) you have until the END of your first semester to get the paperwork filled out for the full first year scholarship, so don't worry too much if they're a little slow getting it done. I know it sucks to have to get loans as a backup, but at least you'll get the full scholarship.

    You submitted the scroll when you first started filling out your paperwork. It's 12 weeks from then, not now.


    If you're going for the medical school scholarship, and unless the number of applicants changed a LOT this year, what you need is an acceptance and a pulse. They will waiver pretty much anything else.
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2009
  29. rkaz

    rkaz

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    How strict are they about the 3.5 GPA and 29 MCAT? Even though it wouldn't be an automatic acceptance, would slightly less than that be acceptable... like 3.3-3.5 GPA or 27-29 MCAT? Would this take forever to be approved, even if you already have a med school acceptance?
  30. drumdoc

    drumdoc Dr. of Drumming

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    I'm applying Navy HSCP, so this may be different if others are applying HPSP. I also had my kit together at the end of May. My recruiter confirmed that mid-June the board met and reviewed HALF of the applicants. Unfortunately, my application did not make the cut. I was told that the next board meeting is scheduled for July 17th, which means there may be two more weeks of waiting ahead.

    This is a bit frustrating given school begins Monday, and I have dependents. However, I am an Army-brat so I'm aware that things don't always move as smoothly/quickly as you'd like.

    Hang in there :thumbup:
  31. Pghboy18

    Pghboy18

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    could anyone let me know how fellowships work in the military w/regards to the HPSP? I'm interested in heme/onc. My biggest concern is whether or not I have to repay my active duty years prior to enrolling in a fellowship.
  32. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member

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    A GPA waiver? Getting the waiver is not the same as being professionally recommended. I hope you have a great MCAT to go along with the low GPA.

    If you are professionally recommended, meet physical standards and clear a general background check, Recruit Command can give you a final acceptance. They only need the scroll to finish the deal and generate the commissioning documents. The scroll does not impact final selection only the ability to bring you into the program.
  33. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member

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    You would not have to pay back your entire time, but it is likely you would do a tour as a general internist prior to starting fellowship.
  34. squad41

    squad41

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    Navy FP or others-

    What do you mean by "professionally recommended?" I did an interview with an O3/physician, who wrote a flattering LOR for my HPSP application. Is that what you were referencing?

    PS- Another week down....still no answers from anyone on my file...just "its still at the board, no word"
  35. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member

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    Here is the process for applying for a Navy HPSP scholarship.

    Pre-req -
    Applicants must be in the process of applying for medical school (or in Med School) for the upcoming fall term. Acceptance is not needed to apply for the scholarship, but (obviously) you will not be brought into the program until you have been accepted into an acreditted school.

    There are several components to the application.

    1) Professional review. The Navy has board which reviews applications for the scholarship. This board is headed by the Head of Student Programs in the MDAD office. It is currently LCDR Sanchez. Each application is reviewed by 3 Navy Physicians and they decide if the applicant meets the academic standards to receive a scholarship. They review transcripts, MCATs, letters of recommendation, Interviews by Navy physicians, and personal statements. Acceptance to a medical school does not guarantee a positive professional review. Interviews by Navy physicians with a positive recommendation are not equivalent to a positive professional review. The interviewers are not looking at a complete package. This board generally meets weekly, but occasional weeks are skipped due to travel, vacations and such. It is rare that a package waits more than 2 weeks prior to review.

    2) Medical review. This is the physical. All medical issues are considered according to Chapter 15 of the Manual of the Medical Department. This instruction dictates which conditions are acceptable or not. If ManMed indicates that a condition is disqualifying, a waiver request can be generated. For physicians, many conditions are not considered problematic and waivers are frequently granted.

    3) Security Check. This is a standard background check. They look for criminal convictions, civil litigation, financial problems, and other character issues which might compromise the individual. Credit problems have become a larger issues in the recent past.

    4) The scroll. All commissioned officers are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Historically, those appointed to the O1-O4 level had been signed by a 3 star admiral with final (rubber stamp) approval coming several months later. About 4 years ago this process changed. The Attorney General determined that the authority was delegated too far and that the Secretary of Defense was as low as it could go. This led to the creation of the scroll. It is simply a list of names, last 4 of SSN, and rank to which they are to be appointed which is routed through Personnel Command and the Office of the Secretary of Defense. There are a number of stops along the way and it can take 12 plus weeks to navigate its way to SecDef. Once the scroll has been returned and approved, comissioning documents can be generated.

    All four of these processes must be completed prior to signing a contract and being commissioned. It is at this point that a benefit start date can be determined. No payments or reimbursements can be made prior to the benefit start date.

    The benefit start date is the latest of three dates:
    1) The day school starts as stated in the Academic Year Statement (AYS). The AYS is completed by the school's registrar.
    2) The day you sign your contract.
    3) The day you are comissioned.

    Dates 2 and 3 are usually the same day.

    I hope this clarifies the process.
  36. BamaMedik

    BamaMedik Junior Member

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    Greetings,

    I'm a current 2 year med student Navy HPSP interested in switching to Air Force in hopes of being stationed near my daughter who lives near a few USAF bases. Is this possible and if so how can it be done? If there is are any Medicine Air Force HPSP would like to switch to Navy HPSP please let me know.

    Thanks.
  37. Phil Dunphy

    Phil Dunphy

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    Hello all,

    I'm considering applying for the Air Force HPSP for next fall (2010). Here are my pros and cons:

    Pros:
    -Interested in serving my country.
    -Older brother served in the Air Force.
    -Was a member of the Air Force Junior ROTC program in high school.
    -Am already in debt for undergraduate loans (private and government), and would like to minimize further debt.
    -Have a wide range of medical fields I am interested in, and therefore don't have my heart set on any one particular residency program.

    Cons:
    -Am hoping to start a family and fear the uncertainty of where I would be stationed/ possibility of going overseas for months at a time during my active duty payback period could put a considerable strain on this.
    -Am most likely going to a state-run med school (tuition ~30k/year) and am not sure the scholarship is worth the commitment in this case.
    -Don't plan on making a lifetime career in military medicine, and fear that I may be set back upon entering civilian medicine after my obligation to the military is met.

    My question is, do you think I have the right mindset for applying for the HPSP? Are the fears of my cons section realistic enough to deter me from the program?
  38. TheGoose

    TheGoose

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    if the reality of not knowing where you could be stationed or the possibility (read: certainty) of deployment bothers you then the military might not be right for you
  39. Sadiemay

    Sadiemay

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    I am nowhere near finished with my undergrad, as matter of speaking I am just not now going into my sophomore year. Since I like to plan ahead I have been reading about the scholarship and I have a few questions. I am currently a nursing major and want to specialize in Pediatrics. I have no problem with going into the military for an extended amount of time. Does the Air Force HPSP still apply for nurses? And how likely is it for nurses to complete residency without the fear of GMO? Will I still get paid for civilian residency?

    Like I said I have a long way to go, but any help and advice would be greatly appreciated!
  40. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member

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    HPSP applies to anyone who is attending/planning to attend a covered professional school (medical, dental, optometry, podiatry, masters level physician assistant, doctorate level clinical psychology (army)). As long as you have the prerequisites for your chosen school, the military doesn't care what your undergraduate degree is.

    The same as anyone else. Having a nursing degree means absolutely nothing. Whether or not you do a GMO tour is more dependant on your choice of specialty and the number of GMOs needed in the year you are applying for an R2 year. If you do pursue pediatrics, they are more likely to go straight through than some other specialties, but some peds interns do end up as GMOs.

    First, that is assuming you are given permission to do a civilian residency. That is by no means a certainty. Primary care is less likely to get a deferment than specialties like surgery, ortho, ER. Should you be given a deferment, it is likely the military will not be paying you a salary, and you will be living off the salary paid by the residency program.
  41. TheGoose

    TheGoose

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    I can't tell if Sadiemay is asking about being a physician (pediatrician) or a nurse (working with a peds population). Are you asking about graduate level nursing education or medical school?
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2009
  42. Sadiemay

    Sadiemay

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    I am referring to a graduate level nursing school to become a PNP.
  43. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member

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    Not covered by HPSP.

    There is not a huge demand for PNPs in the services as a whole. I don't know of any scholarships for this degree that are offered as an accession tool.
  44. TheGoose

    TheGoose

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    Just found this on the interweb. Appears to be from an AF Nursing Recruiter

    HEALTH PROFESSIONS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS (HPSP)

    Under a scholarship program, you are commissioned as a full time student, you will have all tuition, fees, books, tools, and any other program required product PAID 100% for the duration of your Graduate program. You will also be paid a monthly stipend during your schooling to help offset the difference of attending school full time, and taking care of you and your family. All you owe in return is 3 years to the Air Force in the specialty you were schooled in.

    CRNA (46M1) HPSP - Must have been accepted in a master's level CRNA program recognized by the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists and is acceptable to the AF Surgeon General.
    Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) 46N1B – HPSP - Must have been accepted in a master's level PNP program recognized by the National Certification Board of Pediatric Nurse Practitioner and Nurses (NCBPNP/N) or the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC).
    Womens Health Nurse Practitioner (WHNP) 46N1A HPSP - Must have been accepted in a master's level WHNP program approved by the National Certification Corporation (NCC) for obstetrics, gynecological, and neonatal nursing specialties.
    Nurse Midwife (46G1) HPSP - Must have been accepted in a master's level program in nursing with a specialty in nurse-midwifery approved by the ACNM Certification Council (ACC) in Nurse Midwifery.
    Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) 46N1H HPSP - Must have been accepted in a master's level FNP program recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners as a FNP.
    Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (MHNP) 46P1A HPSP - Must have been accepted in a master's level MHNP program recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners as a MHNP.
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2009
  45. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member

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    Interesting....I stand corrected.:hardy:
  46. Sadiemay

    Sadiemay

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    Thank you, that was very helpful.
  47. teacherman84

    teacherman84

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    For those who did HPSP while supporting a family, what loan options would I have for the extra money we would need to live on? Would I still qualify for the govt subsidized loans or are they need based? Thanks
  48. Jolie South

    Jolie South is invoking Domo. . . Moderator Emeritus

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    Federal Staffords are not need based. You can fill out the FAFSA and get them like everyone else.
  49. teacherman84

    teacherman84

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    Thanks, good to know
  50. notdeadyet

    notdeadyet Still in California Moderator

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    Up to the max for the non-tuition portion. You're ineligible for the portion of the Stafford allocated for tuition and are only eligible up to the amount set by your school for living expenses.

    For someone on HPSP, between the money from the Stafford (usually about $15-23k/yr for most schools, depending on cost of living) and the monthly stipend, there's a good bit unless you have a gaggle of kids plus non-working spouse.
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