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Human Factors [ Best (funded) Programs ]

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by PsyI4, Oct 31, 2011.

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  1. PsyI4

    PsyI4

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    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    Are there any funded programs in human factors, engineering psychology, or other related field of this particular nature? If so, which are the best? If no, what are the best doctorate level programs? By "best" I am referring to an overall level of opportunity provided by the program to students for research. I know this is a subjective question but it's fairly easy to figure out what the "good" schools are. Thanks!!
  2. AlaskanJustin

    AlaskanJustin

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    University of Cincinnati has a great Human Factors program. Kevin Shockley and Michael A. Riley are two of the main faculty in that program. The program is technically experimental psych phd (and they have a clinical phd that you can do human factors with as well)

    J
  3. szymk1sm

    szymk1sm

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    Central Michigan has a PhD in Experimental Psychology, with a human factors concentration. Look up Richard Backs, his research is on attention and performance and uses a driving simulator. If you apply to the MS program, you will get partially funded. With the PhD program, I think you're fully funded.
  4. IOPsych

    IOPsych

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    University of Central Florida also has a good human factors psychology program that is fully funded.
  5. ClinPsyWMH

    ClinPsyWMH

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    Miami U in Ohio has some human factors people within the Brain and Cognitive science PhD program.
  6. PETRAN

    PETRAN

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    Human factors/Applied experimental/Engineering psychology always looked like an interesting but obscure field to me. What exactly are you doing as a human factors/engineering psych specialist? What is your role? Designing experiments to test the useability of electronic devices, products, computers, machinery and stuff? What are the job prospects? Average income? I always liked experimental/cognitive/physiological psych and (i imagine) it would be interesting to apply some of the models to real-life situations. Well i guess its too late since i'm in clinical now ( sometimes i regret it though). :laugh: It looks like the exact opposite of clinical psychology, working with human-machine interaction/interface instead of emotional and personality disorders (well not everything in clinical psych is like that e.g. neuropsych, health psych etc. but the majority is)
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2011
  7. cara susanna

    cara susanna Predoctoral Intern

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    Human factors is used in aviation a lot, too.
  8. PETRAN

    PETRAN

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    You are right, thats what i've heard as well. Radars, cockpit design etc. If you think of it, Richard Gregory and James Gibson- both pioneers of experimental/perceptual psychology- used to work in aviation/Air force.
  9. Ollie123

    Ollie123

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    I'd look into I/O programs first, that seems to be (by far) where most of the human factors research I've seen is occurring. I know you asked for the "best" programs but you're likely to have to come to terms with the fact that clear rankings don't really exist at that level of specificity. You just need to find good mentors.

    That said, I'll second the recommendation of the group at UC. Attended a week-long workshop with them over the summer - awesome research and they seemed like really great people.
  10. AlaskanJustin

    AlaskanJustin

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    Was this the nonlinear dynamics training? I am going to that this summer. Shockley is my old prof, great guy. They have recruited a lot of awesome new faculty too, and have some large NSF grants for their work.

    To answer what is human factors... well here is the Cognition, Action and Perception website from UC, check out each of these faculties work
    http://www.uc.edu/cap/
    and the experimental program
    http://www.artsci.uc.edu/collegedepts/psychology/grad/phd/experimental.aspx

    I actually hope to work with some of these guys in the future.
  11. Ollie123

    Ollie123

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    Indeed it was, though unfortunately I was not in the best position to take advantage of it since the dataset I had brought was determined to be inappropriate for that type of analysis and I was so swamped with other stuff I was distracted the whole time.

    Despite that, it was still a great experience and I'm going to be applying some of the stuff we did to data from a few studies that are just finishing up now. I highly recommend the training - I just hope I absorbed enough that I can figure it out on my own and won't have forgotten it all once the time comes to actually apply it!
  12. AlaskanJustin

    AlaskanJustin

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    I actually just emailed Kevin about my data set for the very reason you are mentioning. I dont want to go if I cannot take something away from it.
    But I am almost 100% sure my data set is suitable, considering one lab is using graph theory to analyze the same type of data.

    Ollie, our mutual friend seems to think we would not get along since we are so different, but we seem to have a ton in common! Academically at least.

    ps did you stay in a hotel while in the cinci-nasty?
  13. spafticus

    spafticus

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    Check out Wright State. Right next to a very heavy research air force base.
  14. AlaskanJustin

    AlaskanJustin

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    And the med school is the only med school in the nation teaching/doing research on aerospace medicine.
  15. cara susanna

    cara susanna Predoctoral Intern

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    University of North Dakota doesn't have a human factors program, but they are cutting edge in UAS research right now and the psych department is often involved in aviation/UAS research.
  16. AlaskanJustin

    AlaskanJustin

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    That's interesting. Although I would like to add the point that human factors is not restricted to aviation or even military related work. Not saying that this was your point, but I would hate for someone reading this to get that impression.
  17. futureapppsy2

    futureapppsy2 Ed Psych PhD student Moderator Gold Donor

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    Yes, sounds like a useful collaboration in many ways. ;) :)

    I've heard through the grapevine--don't know how reliable--that Rice--has a very sold human factors/human computer interaction PhD program.
  18. PsychPhDStudent

    PsychPhDStudent

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  19. PsyI4

    PsyI4

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    Clemson has a strong program which appears to be focused on vehicle simulation which is a good match for those wanting to go in the aviation industry. Interestingly, I have come across recommendations (by professors) insisting on obtaining a masters degree in HF (general) if one's goals are not specific to an concentrated industry. The reasoning is two fold: 1) marketability: having a PhD for a well paying entry position in HF requiring a MA is seemed as overqualified. 2) job prospects: a general MA HF degree allows you to enter seemingly endless industries. Since the content is industry specific, employers mainly seek candidates who have the knowledge to apply to the industry's content. The thoughts and views of the members here are appreciated and respected. Thanks for contributing!
  20. RGH80

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  21. LHDMMD

    LHDMMD

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    University of Alabama in Huntsville has Master's program in Experimental and used to have a human factors lab. A friend of mine is now working at Redstone Arsenal doing human factors research with aviation. However, its just a master's program :(
  22. hengli2012

    hengli2012

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    I am considering Cornell's Human Behaviors and Design PhD.Does anyone know much about it? I want to apply for PhD in Human Factors,could someone recommend some programs?Thanks!
  23. Thrak

    Thrak RU experienced?

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    A friend of mine got his Ph.D. in Human Factors from George Mason, and was pretty happy with the program.
  24. sockit

    sockit

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    Really curious... can anyone say more about the reality of working in this field today, in industry? Do human factors specialists realistically have the opportunity to contribute to more inductive, design-phase work, or are they more likely to test prototypes/outcomes and do risk assessments, leaving engineers and designers to the rest (especially outside of aviation/transport/automotive sectors)?

    Do you imagine someone basically driven to 'help people', but inclined to problem-solving, might enjoy HF? Am thinking of applications in industrial design, medical devices, that kind of thing...

    Thoughts on any of the above would be greatly appreciated.
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2013
  25. perhaps11

    perhaps11

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    Dr. Gerry Matthews at U Cincinnati is also very well known and respected in the field. His work involves stress and workload on cognition in human performance - some of his studies have included some military (aviation) work as well as driving simulators and decision-making tasks. Very brilliant man.
  26. Ettevi05

    Ettevi05

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    I took two courses on Human Factors in Texas Tech University and working with Dr. Jones and Dr. DeLucia was extremely enlightening. I got interested in the engineering aspect but I was too much of a chicken to get a minor in Industrial Engineering in order to apply to their master's program.

    Edit: Dr. Jones had research with the army on night vision goggles, and Dr. DeLucia on perception and movement, she has worked with engineering students on research in car accident reconstructions and the likes :)
  27. xidpsyms

    xidpsyms

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    I came across this thread and figured it might need an update since it is still the top discussion you find on the topic in a google search (and the only as far as I can tell).

    First, although University of Cincinnati was once one of the top human factors programs, they no longer have a human factors program. Kevin Shockley and Mike Reilly are certainly there, but the work they do is not considered human factors psychology. They are both products of University of Connecticut, studied under Michael Turvey, and take an ecological or Gibsonian approach to cognition, action, and perception (as do many other faculty members). UC is probably one of the top two or three programs for this type of psychology. Incidentally, I've never heard either Shockley or Reilly described as human factors psychologists before. John Holden, who is also an ecological psychologist did train under a human factors psychologist for his masters at Wright State, but received his Ph.D. under the late Guy Van Orden and now focuses on non-linear techniques, dynamical systems, and complexity, not human factors.

    Human factors as a focus or topic is certainly a broad area and not necessarily confined to a single paradigm, but in practice the bulk of research in the human factors domain and under a human factors heading, especially applied research in industry and military, takes a more cognitive approach. Gerry Matthews was the last remaining member of the human factors psychology program at UC (which was founded in 1981 by Joel Warm and another human factors psychologist). He has now left for University of Central Florida.


    From what I gather the top programs for human factors now are:
    - University of Central Florida
    - George Mason
    - Texas Tech
    - Georgia Tech

    Other programs may also have strong human factors programs, but these four are the programs I've heard about the most in my conversations about notable programs at Human Factors conferences and with students and faculty. University of Central Florida is especially strong with Peter Hancock and now the addition of Gerry Matthews. University of Cincinnati's program has slowly been merging into UCF's program and to a lesser extent George Mason. UCF has a very well rounded and well connected program and have a reputation for graduating quality students on time. I've heard great things about the George Mason program as well but admittedly know less about it. Both programs were very well represented at the 2012 Human Factors Conference. (Just to drive home the point above: not a single current student or faculty member at University of Cincinnati other than Matthews and his students attended or presented at the conference... and this has been true since Warm left the university).

    I certainly don't know all there is to know about all of the human factors programs out there but I hope this is helpful for those searching for good human factors programs to attend. Anyone else have updates?
  28. futurecatlady

    futurecatlady

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    Was going to say Texas Tech also

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