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Internship then Navy SEAL?

Discussion in 'Military Medicine' started by BlackNDecker, Mar 18, 2007.

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  1. BlackNDecker

    BlackNDecker Paid da cost 2 be da bo$$

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    First off, I'm getting pretty bored in med school. It hasn't been the challenge I'd hoped for...

    I am planning on joining the Navy for residency and am wondering if it'd be possible to get a billet for BUD/S? I would go through OIS at the end of MS4 and was hoping to try for a slot at BUD/s...and then again after PGY1 if denied initially.

    Has anyone heard of someone getting in via OIS route? or following internship? I am aware of the possiblity of being a "SEAL doc" but I really want to wear the trident...

    Thanks in advance
  2. Gastrapathy

    Gastrapathy no longer apathetic

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    I'm going to take this at face value and try to give you a serious answer...but first, how exactly do you propose to reconcile the job of being a physician and being a SEAL?

    Now, I know of no one who went to BUD/s after medical school. There are a smattering of folks who did the opposite. To "wear the trident" requires more than just completing BUD/s and there is no job for a "dual designator" special operator.

    If you are reevaluating your desire to be a physician, you may find a refuge in the operational side of military medicine (even a prev med residency, if you are so inclined). But, to be honest, most of us find dealing with the gung-ho warrior physician-types pretty tiresome. In the current state of the world, if you really want to be in the sh**, do an internship and then a GMO tour with a Marine grunt battalion. When you rotate as an MS4, you'll see docs with bronze stars with combat V's and purple hearts from their last Iraq tour (although I'm thinking of specific individuals when I type that so it isn't exactly common). So, I guess I'm saying that now's your chance to be a war hero but don't expect that most physicians (me included) will care.
  3. Croooz

    Croooz Senior Member

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    Not possible to flip back & forth. IF you are released from the Medical Corps to pursue BUD/S then that's that. If you fail, DOR, or medical drop you are in the Navy as line officer. A surgeon I work with was thinking about it till he found out he wouldn't be a doctor SEAL but a doctor who quit medicine to pursue the teams. I've never heard or know of anyone who has done this after medical school. Everyone takes the other route....SEAL then med school.
  4. Ex-44E3A

    Ex-44E3A

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    Speak for yourself. I have great respect for those docs who have put themselves at risk to go out there and get it done in the field. Try to look past the "hooah!" stuff and appreciate what it takes to fill that kind of role.

    As for being a dual-hatter Doc/Operator in the military spec ops field, I otherwise agree with your points.
  5. orbitsurgMD

    orbitsurgMD Senior Member

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    At least you have a sense of humor.

    The most important question, if there is any hint of seriousness here, is whether you have any sort of obligation as things stand: are you USUHS, HPSP, for instance? If you are, you can just forget about it. The Navy can still afford to wash out lots of Special Ops applicants, not so medical corps accessions.

    As others said, you can always sign up for Navy, choose Marines as a GMO and go where they go. If nowhere else, you could still count on going to Afghanistan.

    If you want to wear the trident, you are talking about a whole different life altogether. Medical doesn't intersect with that.
  6. BlackNDecker

    BlackNDecker Paid da cost 2 be da bo$$

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    No $hit...looking for honest answers. I have talked to several recruiters and they eventually scratch their heads when they finally realize what I'm getting at...

    As it stands I have no obligation to the Navy. In all seriousness, I'd be prepared to walk away from a career in medicine if I sucessfully completed training. It's the "what happens if" that concerns me. More likely than not, I'd be injured and would have no choice but to drop on request. My question then, and the one that stumps the recruiters, is where would I end up?

    Crooz, so a line officer is it then, eh? If I had initially planned on doing a residency in the Navy and wash out at BUD/S, what is my actual time commitment? 4 yrs?
  7. West Side

    West Side

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    In my (admittedly limited) experience with military retention, it appears their first order of business is to get their hooks into you for a military commitment. The fact that you want to do BUD/s comes secondary to you being in the Navy.

    Thus, from my again relatively limited understanding, is that you're in the Navy first as a line officer, and you're a SEAL applicant second. Washing out of the latter does not mean washing out of the former.

    Significant chance I'm stating the obvious...
  8. Croooz

    Croooz Senior Member

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    What you owe the military doesn't change. IF allowed to go to BUD/S and do not succeed you will owe the time you owed before. IF you make it then you will probaly owe a bit more time. These are a bunch of "If's". The biggest thing you need is an active duty SEAL with pull that can help to make this happen. Otherwise you're just pissing in the wind. The teams have a backlog of people so I don't see anyone jumping thru hoops to get a would-be physician out of medicine. Stranger things have happened.
  9. East Side

    East Side Removed

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    West Side...you are a complete idiot...why the **** do you still post here? how the hell would a girl even fall for you? she must be pretty stupid to have accepted you into her life and this is clearly reasserted by her lack of knowledge of a ****ing contract. You make me sick and give the word "civilian" a bad name
  10. Ex-44E3A

    Ex-44E3A

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    Was that flame really necessary, EastSide?
  11. R-Me-Doc

    R-Me-Doc Now an X-R-Me-Doc

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    My, my, my. How relevant and erudite your VERY FIRST POST ON SDN is.

    Regardless of what we may think about WestSide, this is pretty much over the line.

    Anyone want to second a motion for the moderators to ban this person?

    X-RMD
  12. Croooz

    Croooz Senior Member

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    My gut reaction is that WestSide and EastSide are the same person. :cool:
  13. Ex-44E3A

    Ex-44E3A

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    Sock-puppetry on a web forum? How banal.
  14. R-Me-Doc

    R-Me-Doc Now an X-R-Me-Doc

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    Maybe we should transfer "them" over to the Psych forum! :eek:


    X-RMD
  15. BigNavyPedsGuy

    BigNavyPedsGuy Junior Member

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    Then let's ban them both :idea:
  16. edinOH

    edinOH Can I get a work excuse?

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    South Side could kick both their asses.
  17. Gastrapathy

    Gastrapathy no longer apathetic

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    Fair enough. My primary objection to people like this is they tend not to be the ones that actually do the most. The statement "wear the trident" grates on me because the motivation is to get a big shiny thing on your uniform rather than to take care of sailors and marines in a challenging environment. I have nothing but respect for the people that have done that (I think I've done my part to some degree, too) but I'd like to think that they weren't motivated by shiny things but rather by the people they helped.

    As for Westside, et al. why are you here anyway?
  18. mumiitroll

    mumiitroll Removed

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    hey, i think this is an interesting thread. i dont have any aspirations like the op. but just have general interest in most "operational" or cool assignments as a doctor. so why exactly is it that marine GMOs get the best stuff? could you describe some of their assignments in iraq/afghanistan and of course at home (for example while at camp pendleton). And please compare them to the navy fs and dmo's who are attached to eod vs dmo attached to marines.
  19. mumiitroll

    mumiitroll Removed

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    or may be those people just want to get the most out of their life experiences. what's the point of being a military officer if all you do is work in a hospital?
  20. Trajan

    Trajan Senior Member

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    The gung-ho warrior doc wannabes are indeed tiresome. We are not trained to be Force Recon Marines, even the UMO's who go with them. Pretending that you are and going beyond your bounds will only put those servicemen at risk when you do deploy to combat. There are most definitely doctors who are decorated for valor (I think that we should care about these things unlike Gastrapathy), but consider that they are usually awarded for doctoring in extraordinary circumstances, not for being an Audie Murphy.

    Several Navy surgeons earned Navy Crosses in Vietnam, each for the essentially the same situation: Marine with unexploded RPG impaled in leg or abdomen comes into field hospital urgently, surgeon orders everyone out of the OR, removes explosive knowing it could blow at any moment. Obviously very heroic, certainly meriting the Navy Cross, but it's not what most naive doc warrior wannabes think of, i.e. doc drops scalpel, picks up M-16, and saves an entire squad from the enemy. Occasionally such a situation does happen, but when it does it means **** really hit the fan and many men died before the doctor had to fight, so why would you want that situation to happen at all? Example--in WWII a dental corps officer manned a machine gut at a batallion aid station that had been overrun in the Pacific. He was awarded the Medal of Honor -- posthumously. This is terrible stuff; be careful what you wish for.
  21. Out in 2008

    Out in 2008

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    Doesn't really fit in with the Spec Warfare Ethos.

    I don't think previous posts were quite clear. Navy physicians do not receive SEAL warfare qualification, they do not "wear the trident". Most, to my knowledge are UMO's. If you were to walk away from your training as a physician, that's fine. My personal opinion is that people who do that after graduating medical school should find the person whose seat in medical school he/she took and send that person a letter of apology.

    There are different routes for getting into BUD/S. I'm not sure sure what the active duty obligations for the different routes. If you were to not complete the training and you took the Navy dime, you'll be on the hook. I suspect the Navy would give you the option of physician or SWO, they're short on both these days.
  22. BlackNDecker

    BlackNDecker Paid da cost 2 be da bo$$

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    ...people just want to hear themselves talk(er...type):thumbdown:

    It's obvious most of the people who posted negative comments aren't reacting to my post; rather they're reacting to some insecurity/issues within themselves. Take a sec...breathe...relax...count to 10....

    I wasn't implying finishing residency and HALO'ing into Baghdad with an M60 and a license to kill & heal. Furthermore, I don't need nor am I asking for your respect...

    :rolleyes: Gimme a break...I think everyone on this board would run out of fingers trying to count the slackers that were not only accepted into their med school, but also nursed from the nipple all the way through! People who don't belong are getting accepted into med school as I type this... Wanting to pursue a dream, even if it is spec war, doesn't make me unfit to practice. It simply means I graduated med school and now want to pursue something else for a few years. Get over yourself, you're not god's gift to medicine.

    :confused: What's with the issues? Why do you allow another person's actions to irritate you so bad??? Before you type...that was a rhetorical question...the answer is of course for you to seek within yourself.

    It's hard to convey thoughts with type...sorry if "wear the trident" came off as shallow. I only typed it that way b/c that's the way it's refered to by those who've have made it through. I guess the reverence was lost on you.

    I'm not trying to be a "hero doc," whatever that means. I'm simply finding info on something I've always wanted to do. I hope I haven't alienated those who might actually have something worthwhile to post.
  23. BlackNDecker

    BlackNDecker Paid da cost 2 be da bo$$

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    Ironic how I'm being criticized for "reevaluating my desire to be a physician" by someone who finds himself witty b/c he combined APATHY w/ a medical disorder.
  24. mumiitroll

    mumiitroll Removed

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    to op,
    if you want to become a navy seal, may be ask those questions on a navy seal forum or whatever. if you do not have hpsp or any other commitments now, you are free to apply for OCS+BUD/s. If you are selected, you'll serve for 4yrs at about $40k/yr and $200k in debt or $200k out of your parents' pocket. If you do have hpsp, then nobody is going to release you, you'd have to get permission from your superior medical officer to separate from the navy and reenter as O-1. you also mentioned overuse injuries. Does this mean that you have no experience running/swimming/ serious working out? If you were really interested in being a SEAL, you might find time to be in good enough shape to run 10k in 40mins and do 20+ pullups even while in med school. But then, why didnt you just enlist at 18? If you have serious interest in reconaissance operations, then there are other activities to satisfy your cravings. Have you ever simulated any reconaissance exercises, or the most you've ever done was play a video game? why dont you try to go on a 100mile hike over some weekend in the style of John Muir and see if you like it? If you do, you might come up with something more creative later.
  25. VolatileNavyDoc

    VolatileNavyDoc Junior Member

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    One of the big problems with the plan is that there really just aren't many "cool" jobs out there for O-3s. The only group that really uses there LTs as operators are SEALs, and I don't know if they let you start training as an LT. Probably the best way to get an answer is to email a SEAL "motivator" (read recruiter) at [email protected].

    With that being said, there are some really good jobs out there for Navy physicians that allow you to have autonomy and kind of pave your own way. They are few and far between, and you usually have to be in the right place at the right time.

    I wholeheartedly agree with Orbitsurg that a Marine GMO is the way to go if you want some excitement mixed in with your medicine. The reason it's the way to go is that you actually deploy with your unit, whereas most docs attached to SEAL/Recon units will never deploy into combat with their unit. As long as you stay motivated, it's not hard as a Marine GMO to participate in really any training you want. The time is there. As an infantry Marine GMO, you belong to a Marine LtCol, so you should be doing what he thinks you should be doing, not what some guy on SDN says. Keep in mind that people go into MilMed for different reasons. Some among us often resent what some of the more bold or "gung ho" ones do. So when you do it, have fun, don't worry about the warfare devices and medals, and don't talk about it to those who aren't interested. As long as you're there to provide medical care when needed, and all of your guys can deploy, you're generally doing what you need to do. After that, it's all gravy. If you want to play NCAA '07, fine, but if you want to learn more about your guys and have some more interesting opportunities, then meet your military peers and find out what else you can do. Finally, I'll say that doctors sometimes do find themselves in a bad spot, so any training you get to learn which end of the gun goes boom may save your or someone else's life. Few things are more embarrassing as a medical corps officer than to see the x-ray of one of your peers who shot himself in the foot trying to "ride the hammer home" after locking and loading his 9mm when getting on a helicopter for routine transport in a combat zone.
  26. BigNavyPedsGuy

    BigNavyPedsGuy Junior Member

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    That's pretty funny and sad all at the same time.
  27. Croooz

    Croooz Senior Member

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    Boy this went downhill pretty fast. If you are physically fit, as in you can blow the Diver PRT out of the water, then locate a SEAL Chief and start making some calls. It can happen however you have to physically be at a point where you could ace BUD/S. As I'm sure you know the mental is the part that'll get ya. However if you prove on paper that you can run, swim, & PT with the best of them then you might find an ally who will speak to the right people to get you into BUD/S. As I've already said, you will no longer be a physician. You will be a line officer trying out for BUD/S.

    This is where things get ugly. If you don't make it you will payback your time with the line community. You can make a case and transfer back into the medical corps.....but the Navy is very small. People will know your name and life will be very difficult for you. You may not be allowed to transfer back in the medical corps. If you are which I highly doubt it you will not get selected for residency or getting every crap assignment the Navy has to offer.

    I would say if you're not 100% certain you will make it then think long and hard. This isn't a game. Be prepared to have your dedication questioned. While you may believe you accomplished the goal of becoming a doctor all you've done is finish medical school. The SEAL's will see it the same way as someone who transfers out of the SpecWar community after completing BUD/S. Just like there's more to being a SEAL than completing BUD/S, there's more to being a doctor than finishing med school.

    Not a lecture, just some things to consider if and when you are confronted with why you "quit" medicine. The line you'll hear is "if you quit medicine, you'll quit BUD/S".
  28. Gastrapathy

    Gastrapathy no longer apathetic

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    Alright sparky, you can cut and paste my post to change the meaning if you'd like but it doesn't change what I actually wrote.

    My problem with people like you is that you'll come into military medicine looking to avoid the actual doctoring. You'll make sure to max out your "squadron time", etc and leave other GMO's holding the bag seeing clinic because you joined to be a warrior rather than to do 150 pap smears.

    I DO respect the people who have served in combat and am friends with a couple who went house to house in Falluja (sp?) but they were there to be doctors. There is nothing wrong with training with your unit and it can be a blast to blow things up. I have a warfare qualification and a deployment under my belt and I'm proud of it. However, my experience with people who joined military medicine expressly for the chance to do that stuff is that they are less than motivated to do the mundane work that makes up 95% of primary care medicine/GMO medicine.
  29. BKK

    BKK Member

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    The thing to consider is...Do SEAL teams even have physicians on their T/O? They most likely have Navy Corpsmen that are trained to SEAL standards that go out of mission to provide care, or they may not even have that capability and take care of their own until they get out of the situation (AF Major talking about this...for all I know about the Navy may not be much more than my Golden Retriever knows about the Navy...).

    SEAL units most like do have a UMO that is well versed in what they may experiences, much like a F16 Flight doc knows about his squadrons needs. But to actually go through the full up BUD/S training, it might be a stretch.

    I have known Army docs that had been through Ranger/SF training and wore the applicable tabs as their unit docs, so it might be possible. The main thing would be to become a fully trained doc, then try to get assigned somewhere that you might be the medical asset for this type of unit.

    Good luck, but don't hold your breath.
  30. BlackNDecker

    BlackNDecker Paid da cost 2 be da bo$$

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    Thanks for the response guys:thumbup: . Finally the constructive criticism I initially posted for.

    Mumiitroll, I appreciate the tongue in cheek post. I can assure you my physical ability is in line with my military aspirations.
  31. J-Rad

    J-Rad Moderator Emeritus

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    Truth be told I understand the thoughts of the Hoo-Ah career choice. As an enlisted Air Force Reservist I used to ponder joining a Reserve or Guard Special Tactics or Tac-P unit (I just realized that my fear of heights, then pack-a day habit, and overall p*ssy-ness probably made me not such a good candidate for the job:rolleyes: ). I also agree with those that pointed out that any commitment to a service for medical school funding (ie HPSP) would preclude release from ADSC (service obligation) to pursue SEAL training. As it stands though you have no such commitment, so that is not an issue. From what I understand what you would desire to do is complete medical school (which I assume, right or wrong, has placed you or family at some level of debt) then not enter residency, but rather enter the Navy and attempt to train as a SEAL. I'll throw out a couple of things that have not been mentioned. In this career track there is no transfer to line status, you just start there. Also, everyone here has presumed that you would enter as an officer (I think there was some assumptions that you would be commissioned into the MC first, then leave to try BUD/s. But since you have no commitment to the military via Service Academy, ROTC, HPSP, or USUHS you would have to complete civilian residency first and then apply for active duty [or do the equivalent of the AF FAP during your civ. residency] in the medical corps). To enter as a line officer you would have to apply for, and be accepted for, OCS first. Then you would do Officer training (I do not know if you can apply for SEAL training at the same time as applying for OCS, or during OCS). You may not be accepted for officer training. Alternatively you can enlist, and apply for SEAL. Either way, minimum commitment to the military is 8 years for non-prior service (active duty time and the rest at least in the IRR). As other people have stated, if you are accepted for training as a SEAL and are unable to complete it, you will still be obligated to the NAVY and will do what they need you to do (outside of SPECWAR). I think there are other avenues to scratch your itch, but they all carry some type of risk (but what choices in life don't?); I provide them as food for thought (please realize I am an Air Force guy, and despite training at a Navy hospital, my knowledge is only based on my life experience, who I've met, and what I can glean from the internet. I.E. I do NOT represent myself as an expert in things Navy or Special Warfare). One option to think about is enlisting in the Navy Reserve and applying for a job that works closely with the SEALs and affords the opportunity to attend BUD/s (such as SWCC [http://www.sealchallenge.navy.mil/swcc/ ]) I know there are Reserve SEALs, but to my knowledge that are all people who were prior active duty (this is from my wife who was a Yeoman at a SPECWAR unit), but on the website provided they do say Reservists are eligible for SWCC. The advantage (aside from scratching the Hoo-Ah itch) is that if you do not complete training, you are obligated only to the Reserves and that would not preclude residency training, obviously after the delay incurred by your basic and specialty training. A delay in starting residency (assuming that you would eventually) that would not be as debilitating as the 4+ year delay you might experience if you had gone active duty. Likewise if you did pass training you could start a residency and get your Hoo yah-yahs out with your reserve duty. Obviously there is a risk of deployment interrupting residency training and future practice, but the risk/benefit seems comparatively better than the AD route. A similar route to think about would be, instead of pursuing Navy Reserve SpecOps looking at AF (or Army SpecOps for that matter) Reserve/Air Guard Special Tactics (www.specialtactics.com). There are Reserve and Guard Special Tactics squadrons and I do know that they will accession qualified civilians into the training pipeline for Pararescue or Combat Control (since you are college educated you could look into if they will accession a non-prior service person as a Reserve Combat Rescue Officer; again entailing applying for officer training. I would doubt this, though.) As someone trained in medicine the Pararescue career field would probably be interesting to you (basically elite forces trained as experts in combat search and rescue and at paramedic+ level (like your Independent Duty Medical Technician/Corpman)). Training pipeline after AF Basic Military Training is 1 1/2-2 years. Obviously all the attendant what-if-you-fail and deployments (pass or fail) risks as well as being on the Reserve side benefits. Again, I assume the Army has some Reserve/Guard opportunities to consider as well. Just broaden your thought process, and maybe there are some things out there that will give you the adventure you want and let you have a medical career as well (to not carry that afore mentioned debt and not get a return from it).
  32. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member

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    Whenever I have been operational the general rule was that if Medical has to start firing weapons, its game over. I have had friends in combat zones where the unit line commander would bring the physician along for the mission. I am not sure this is the best use of docs, but it does happen.
    As a rule we should be like Barney Fife and keep our bullet in our pocket.
  33. a1qwerty55

    a1qwerty55 Attending

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    People who are enamored with badge collecting scare me.

    When I worked with Special Ops/Rangers/Infantry etc. albeit limited exposure....

    All of them could care less if I had a Ranger tab, but all had a keen interest in my clinical skills - they can do the shooting if I can do the fixing.

    I've seen several docs who pursued the special ops route and many appeared to be doing so to validate themselves as soldiers (look I really do have a penis!), or to enhance their careers. Other frankly had screws loose - one guy was going to use his bonus to buy an M-60 machine gun. When the medical and shooter roles get confused bad things happen. Don't try to be one of "the boys" at the expense of your role as a healer.

    If it is about a physical or mental challenge of completing BUDS..do the ecochallenge,,,, or the Ironman, if you want to provide care for Seals... you don't need to go to BUDS.

    Figure out our your priorities... If you think you are cut out to be a SEAL.... then drop out of medical school and pursue that.
  34. corpsmanUP

    corpsmanUP Senior Member

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    I don't fault you for your line of thinking BnD. You are obviously young and confident, and who can possibly fault that? You probably are in excellent physical shape, and you may be sick of doing medicine. But I think you have to play the Vegas odds on this one and stick with what you know will get you to home plate in the end. I was once in similar shoes. I had trained for months to take the BUD/S qualifying PT exam when I was about 19. I had already served in the Gulf War and wanted more than general corpsman duty.

    I trained with several buddies who were notably tougher than I physically, maybe not mentally. I sat back and let them go ahead of me to see how they would fare. Not one of them made it through, though several rolled back multiple times. Injuries took their toll and they just could not overcome them. These guys were true machines!! I decided against having the same fate, because at the end they were each at the Navy's mercy regarding duty station and assignments. I spent the rest of my time as a corpsman with the Marines, and I got to do some really high speed training. I worked at the Sniper School in Quantico and knew more about weapons when I was done than most of the instructors. I assure you any physician on the green side who has aspirations of doing high speed training will be embraced by the Marine chain of command. And best yet, having worked later on with special operation teams from various services, I never saw a fraternity of individuals that cared for each other more than the Marine warfare community.

    Navy medicine is such that corpsman are the backbone, and they are the best trained medical specialists (the only enlisted corps in any service). If you train with them, teach them what you know, and be the rare physician who becomes like them, you will have more respect and admiration and serve a much higher purpose than you ever could as a SEAL.
  35. Tired

    Tired Still winning.

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    Why would the Navy fund medical school, only to let a potential doctor out of their medical committment to pursue BUD/S? God knows there are enough guys clamoring for those SEAL spots, but (assuming you can believe what you read) we're hurting for docs.

    It would seem to be a poor investment to let an MD serve out his committment in a purely operational capacity.
  36. corpsmanUP

    corpsmanUP Senior Member

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    He said he has no commitment to the Navy at this point.
  37. Tired

    Tired Still winning.

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    I know that, but he also said in his original post, "I am planning on joining the Navy for residency."

    I don't know how you can just walk into a Navy residency without being USUHS or HPSP, but I would imagine that doing a Navy residency would incur some kind of commitment. Thus my question stands, unless the Navy has decided to start training people for free.
  38. West Side

    West Side

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    Perhaps he means FAP? Thus, he's technically the Navy's property during residency, but not actually doing a Navy residency. WAG...
  39. mumiitroll

    mumiitroll Removed

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    hey, since this topic is about navy seals, i wanted to ask a question about working out. how come this guy doesnt have biceps like arnold schwartzenegger: http://media.crossfit.com/cf-video/onearmpull.mpg
    http://media.crossfit.com/cf-video/onearmrope.mpg he looks quiete average.

    here, on the other hand, is a gymnast with perfect biceps:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/olmedia/935000/images/_936779_4gym300.jpg

    does it mean that to get ripped like this, doing 1armed pullups is not enough?

    i already read that gymnasts alternate between strength and hypertrophy. i.e. to become stronger you do sets of 2-5reps at 90%+, but when you hit a plateau, you switch to sets of 8-15reps/set at 70% of max.

    i currently do twice a week about 5sets of 3-5 of weighted pullups and on the other days i just several sets of 15 regular pullups without going to failure. so my goal is to get a 1armed pullup. but does it mean that my biceps will still look average? i realize that gymnasts train 5hrs/day, i cant do that for obvious reasons. i do cardio also, which is supposed to cut body fat% to make you more ripped, but is it really going to make you ripped? after all i've never seen a marathon runner who looked like a gymnast...
  40. corpsmanUP

    corpsmanUP Senior Member

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    The vast majority of special ops guys do not look like either a gymnast or a body builder. They are often small guys who pound per pound are extremely strong. But they don't usually look like Rambo. They have to do too much endurance training in my opinion to get bulky. There are some that get big, but they generally do it on their own time outside the required PT.
  41. spursss

    spursss Member

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    B/c olympic gymnast can probably do close to 50+ pull ups if they want. No one is stronger in proportion to their body size than a gymnast.
  42. mumiitroll

    mumiitroll Removed

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    i didnt say they all looked like bodybuilders or like gymnasts. but i thought they and the people on this thread were knowledgeable about muscles.
  43. mumiitroll

    mumiitroll Removed

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    the guy in that video can probably also do 50+ pullups. do you know how hard it is to climb a rope with 1 hand?? and yet his biceps dont stand out. as for strength, i think olympic weightlifters in similar weight categories might be stronger at some exercises. they probably have stronger forearms, thighs, lower back, but gymnasts have stronger chest, shoulders, abs, and their biceps should be comparable.
    look at this olympic medalist in <77kg:
    http://weightliftingexchange.com/we2471.html
    i think if i met him on the street or on the beach, i wouldnt even realize he's an athlete.
    http://weightliftingexchange.com/we2475.html
    this silver medalist actually seems a bit more muscular, he is 10years older too.

    but does this mean that i can work my way up to doing 50+ pullups and i won't even look like those guys?

    this guy is a beast:
    http://www.born2bbig.com/viewpic.php?im=images/profilepics/1151661231.jpg
  44. Croooz

    Croooz Senior Member

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    mumitroll,
    Cardio doesn't rip you up...diet does. Diet dictates what your body will look like.

    Back to the OP. I see I assumed as well you had some obligation to the military. If you are serious then I would suggest that you enlist in the military in order to become a SEAL. The officer route is longer and not as direct. Neither route is guaranteed but you stand a better chance of getting to BUD/S sooner as enlisted than as an officer. You could always apply for a commission down the line.

    I would join the Navy as a doc and apply to get into as many high speed assignments as you can. There are pleny of docs who screw over their guys (corpmen) and get sent to jump, dive, HALO.....so I guess you can do the same? If you want to be the doorkicker then enlist and go BUD/S. If you don't want to jeapordize your medical future then do a military residency and see how many high speed, low drag assignments you can get.
  45. EElise

    EElise

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    Hi all, I just wanted to ask about the option of not being involved in HPSP, FAP, etc. (absolutely no medically related military connection) and instead being in the Reserves (officer or enlisted) at the same time as doing the civilian medicine route. I remember reading about a physician who joined as an enlisted medic in the Reserves (he was sadly killed in Iraq). This Reserves idea has already been addressed for the OP, but I just wanted to ask, if I wanted to be in the Coast Guard Reserves while practicing medicine, how feasible is that? And does it make any difference that you are a physician, and therefore purposely not choosing a badly needed military job that you are readily qualified for? (for the CG, I'm talking about choosing not to be in the Public Health Corps) Thanks guys for any insight.
  46. megadon

    megadon

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    No idea, coast guard doesn't play under the HPSP rules that I know of. I have no idea where they get docs from. They used to be under Department of Transportation, and under law the Navy could mobilize them in times of war. Since inception of Homeland Security, they were transferred there, and I have no idea what their affiliation with the Navy is any more. I have no idea if they even have a med corps.

    Now, to talk about the SEALS, since I have friends that are SEALS, and one of my classmates was a SEAL, we have talked about physique a lot. A lot of them are wiry, maybe in keeping with this gymnast fetish, although I would argue towards long distance swimmer. Some are ripped and huge, but that's a big disadvantage if they are with a mostly swimming unit. My other really good friend from a previous job was like Willem Defoe, absolutely ripped but wiry as could be. My current SEAL classmate is a bit of a butterball, but strong. He talks about all his fat instructors and teammates. Hey, as long as you can pass the tests, no one cares.

    If you want to see some of the most behemoth men I've seen, the Marine PTI (physical training instructors, teach hand to hand, etc) are the biggest people I've ever seen. They workout twice a day, and the Marine Corps manages their schedule to promote this. These people could never pass a height weight test. One of my gunny's at the academy had been one of these guys, he also had been an offensive linebacker for the raiders.
  47. BigNavyPedsGuy

    BigNavyPedsGuy Junior Member

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    Offensive linebacker isn't a position. I assume you mean offensive lineman or linebacker. I'm not trying to nitpick, but I played defensive lineman in college. I feel it's my duty to educate the world about football.
  48. The White Coat Investor

    The White Coat Investor AKA ActiveDutyMD Partner Organization

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    I just assumed he was talking about the QB...offensive linebacker.....never mind.
  49. Tired

    Tired Still winning.

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    I swear I just made a trade for an OLB in Madden 2007 . . .
  50. West Side

    West Side

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    Not sure if you're kidding or not. OLB = Outside Linebacker.

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