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Interventional pediatric cardiologist

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by bekham, Sep 15, 2008.

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  1. bekham

    bekham

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    How much does an interventional pediatric cardilogist make.I was wondering because its an interventional procedure like VSD AND ASD closures he should be making a considerable amount but some say they make only as much as general pediatricians in academic setting.Which is it??
  2. J-Rad

    J-Rad Moderator Emeritus

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    http://swz.salary.com/salarywizard/layouthtmls/swzl_compresult_national_HC07000322.html

    See the above link. I have no idea how the stats were arrived at, but it is generally known that Peds Cards is one of the best paying specialties of peds (along with neo). A general pediatric cardiologist will do well for him/herself (as a rule making significantly more than a general pediatrician), and interventionalists (either cath or EP) generally make even more (more and more invasive procedures).

    FYI, some variation of this question comes up pretty frequently.
  3. bekham

    bekham

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    Thanks Jrad but I really couldnt find the salary of an interventional pediatric cardiologist anywhere on the netdespite many mentioning ADULT interventional cardios salaries a zillion times which made me even more frustrated!!!!!!!I was hoping people with experience or inside knowledge could share it with us:laugh:
  4. J-Rad

    J-Rad Moderator Emeritus

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    The problem is some of us find it tacky to ask others how much they make. But if it ever comes up in conversation, I'll ask our interventionalist what the going rate is; barring that, maybe in a few years I'll have more first hand knowledge.
  5. bekham

    bekham

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    Are you a fellow in peds cardio????just wondered
  6. J-Rad

    J-Rad Moderator Emeritus

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    Yes.
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2008
  7. docno1

    docno1

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    Hey J rad
    I was wondering if NICU makes more than cards
    I heard NICU was highest paying of all specialties
  8. J-Rad

    J-Rad Moderator Emeritus

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    http://swz.salary.com/salarywizard/...Tab=&hdNarrowDesc=Healthcare -- Practitioners

    If you believe the above, then the payscale is similar for both.

    This is probably the best I'm going to do for you. I'm not being obstinate, but I think a few things, beside my dislike for asking others what their salaries are (and since you are in NY, I would think there would be a fair selection of people to ask at your own facility or facilities near you), that make this question hard to answer: geographic location, community hospital vs. academic center, private group or not, and in the case of cardiology, are you doing a super-specialty (imaging specialist, electrophysiologist, interventionalist, pediatric cardiac intensivist [rumor is that they are making quite a bit]). My guess would be that the above estimates are based in some factual source and seem a reasonable estimate of the respective salaries.
  9. motorola

    motorola

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    I have heard up to 1 million in Virginia area in a private group practice!:cool:
  10. J-Rad

    J-Rad Moderator Emeritus

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    Pshaw, I hear they make one billion per year in Nome;)
  11. bekham

    bekham

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    hey i didnt start the thread with this in mind :}....btw jrad i sent u a message......Even tho its funny to read these scraps i was wondering about how interventional peds cardio was different from regular peds cardio thats all........Neonate docs i appreciate ur scraps also:sleep:
  12. J-Rad

    J-Rad Moderator Emeritus

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    I was actually being sincere when I said I would ask what the going rate is in interventional, IF it comes up in the natural course of a conversation (for me the salary is a non-issue for a while, as I owe some time to Uncle Sam after fellowship). Certainly the procedures are what differentiate interventional the most from general peds cards. It's really cool what can be done in the cath lab, and I'm sure there is great satisfaction in being a diagnostician, medical manager, and someone who can "play around" on the inside and fix things. The knowledge base of the physiology that is seen in the cath lab is shared amongst all pediatric cardiologists, so amongst a group I think there is a very integrated feel amongst all of the practitioners. Oddly, I find that the EPs are the ones that seem to have the "special knowledge"-I guess it seems the most cerebral of the superspecialties, but I'm sure the gloss of mystery will fade as I (hopefully) learn more. The downside to interventional-two four hour cases in one day, in lead and scrubbed the whole dang time (didn't I not go into surgery to avoid that?).
    PS I PMd you since I don't have much experience using the "notifications" feature.
  13. dsherida

    dsherida Senior Member

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    Really interested in peds cardiology and listening to interns I work with on service (I am an M3), it sounds like a really busy lifestyle. How busy are you as a fellow and as an attending: hrs per week, call schedule, etc.? Thanks!
  14. bekham

    bekham

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    Good question.....anyone here know about that as well...Jrad I PM ed u again sorry :}
  15. J-Rad

    J-Rad Moderator Emeritus

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    Sorry for the delay in response. As it were the last post occurred right as things were getting pretty busy for me, both at work and at home. I would concur that cardiologists have a fairly busy lifestyle at an academic center. Currently that is my only frame of reference. I would hazard a guess that someone at other types of practice might be less busy, but I'm unsure. Answering a question about call schedules for staff or fellow is somewhat difficult-it will be very program/practice dependent. For example (in regards to fellowships): I interviewed at three mid-size programs. One program had month-long rotations and (I vaguely recollect) you were on call q~5-7. Another had two-month long and you were on call for two-week blocks, rotating amongst the fellows. My program has two week rotations and you are on call three days a week while on the inpatient service, one day if on the cath service, and Fri-Sun rotates amongst all that are not on the inpatient service. A lot of programs are mostly home call (but call-ins can be fairly frequent) and some are a mix of home and in-house call. And there is certainly a variety of size in different programs (the largest being Texas Children's, Michigan, CHOP, and Boston and some mid-large programs like Atlanta Children's, etc).
    If I were to give you a gestalt of "busiest" subspecialty lifestyles it would go something like this: PICU & NICU are going to be the busiest for obvious reasons. Of the specialties that have an outpatient component, Heme-Onc is probably the busiest with Endocrine, Cards, and Neurology coming in a close second. The nature of an individual program/practice may substantially affect that though. Depending on the practice GI docs can also be quite busy. The least busy would be Adolescent, and pediatric-focused allergists. Peds ED kind of has to fall into it's own category due to the shift work.
  16. bekham

    bekham

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    J rad I PMed you

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