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Interview impressions

Discussion in 'Radiation Oncology' started by stephew, Dec 10, 2005.

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  1. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Didn’t have time to feel it out, but Denver seems like a great place for either the married or single folks. Tons of outdoor activities, mountains. Downsides—Must have a car, hospital is in suburbia. No other cities within driving distance.

    Faculty: 7 faculty, didn’t get to meet Dr. Raben (sabbatical) who is supposedly the liveliest of the bunch. Chairwoman Gaspar was nice, but not at all supportive of residents going into the lab, said they decided wasn’t in anyone’s best interests. Weird as almost of all applicants that day had either Ph.D or took time off for research. Very nice group overall. Dr. Kavanaugh is big name in SBRT, lots of research opportunity with him.

    Residents: Great group, very fun to talk to. Stressed that they didn’t want “weird” people there. Lots of athletic types. Six there now, no PG-2s. 2-5’s, 2-4’s, 2-3’s, and 2 interns. Weird, why not 2,2, 1,1? Very happy. One started Holman, then cut down to one year of lab time—sounds like this is no longer available. All love Denver.

    Department/Program: Solid training. Both PG-5s going private, they are first grads. Seemed to be productive group in terms of clinical abstracts/publications. Strong in Peds, Dr. Liu from Harvard is Peds-only attending & new PD. Great new children’s hospital. Dept. is relatively new, standard stuff. Good mix of patients/disease sites, no glaring weaknesses. Residents did say it’s a constant battle to keep 7 attendings happy with only 6 (5 if one on research/in lab) residents, they end up covering additional service on their attending’s academic day—not a fan of that.

    My Two Cents: Upper mid-tier program in great location. Seems to have smarter/cooler residents than level of training might draw, due to location. No glaring weaknesses, nice people & dept., but distinct feeling that residents really interested in basic science aren’t really wanted.
  2. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Very livable city, affordable. Was just recently however overtaken by Detroit as poorest city in the U.S. Cleveland proper still recovering from the abandoned-warehouse look. Most residents lived in nicer suburbs. One guy lived downtown, said the warehouse-type scene was growing, but not yet really vibrant.

    Faculty: Nice group. Dr. Suh is truly impressive, very hard worker who will move dept. into a more academic direction. PD is Dr. Videtic, seems very interested in education & selecting strong residents who will fit in well. Dr. Chao is young new CCF-trained CNS guy, bringing on 2-3 more of their grads as new faculty, allowing (pushing?) some of the older attendings less academically-oriented to work at satellites. Dr. Cieski has very established & large prostate brachy program/database.

    Residents: 9 total. Think most are married; Cleveland’s a good town for that. Very nice, seemed truly happy there. Quite a few recent & upcoming grads staying on as faculty—must say something about environment.

    Department/Program: Solid training. Saw morning conference—well-structured, a bit intense, but PD & chair actively involved, more than you can say for a lot of places. They emphasize that their volume is the biggest thing that allows residents to be productive research-wise. 9 dedicated research months in one block. All but 1 resident had abstract at ASTRO and got to go. Well-supported for meetings. H&N attendig is apparently skeptical about IMRT, and therefore they still treat most head-and-neck with 3-field, but otherwise advanced technology. Big GammaKnife program. Must do month at St. Jude’s for Peds.

    My Two Cents: Verge of top-tier program in so-so location. Traditionally little innovation but Dr. Suh is energizing dept. with vision and young faculty. Didactics on par or better than anywhere else if you need to be pushed to learn. OK clinical research. Mention of bringing in some physician scientists, but not there yet. Also some mention of some new agreements/centers (hush hush) that could dramatically enhance research opportunities.
  3. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Seattle is a great city. Lots of outdoor stuff to do, great music scene, lively nightlife, fairly affordable as far as cool large cities go. One issue is that residents work at UWMC (majority—cover childrens & harborview county also during these rotations), VA (total 6 mo), Seattle cancer care alliance (posh, 6 mo). VA is pretty far drive, others close. Residents seemed happy with the city, didn’t mind numerous sites.

    Faculty: 14 full-time clinicians. Douglas the PD seemed nice, residents seemed happy with him despite previous poor reviews on this forum. He was a ped oncologist, so trained very hard and may not have much tolerance for whining about relatively petty concerns of radonc residents in that sense. Lots of turnover lately, 7 new faculty in last 2 years—mostly very young. When asked, one resident said “no one” is prolific in publishing—apparently not a priority of the senior faculty in evaluating junior faculty. All very nice, but newer faculty not from programs that one would consider academically-oriented.

    Residents: 10 spots. An interesting mix, a few older residents with varied background (business etc) and a few traditional. Good single/married mix. Rather poor turnout at dinner, I think only 2-3 made it, which is poor considering only 2 interview days. Seemed happy, mostly aiming private practice. Work fairly hard (7-7ish).

    Department/Program: Only saw UWMC, which wasn’t too nice itself but is supposedly the “ugliest” of the physical sites you work in. All the toys, getting a Tomo at the VA, have neutrons for what that’s worth (little?). New attendings were frank that before new influx the didactics pretty much sucked, echoed by older residents. This seemed to have changed, and now didactics seemed quite plentiful. Senior faculty didn’t seem too involved in didactics. They talk about numerous projects available, but everyone said that infrastructure for research is poor, hard to get stuff out, and few residents seemed to actually be interested or doing research. 6 months dedicated research time (split 3 & 3). All faculty need resident coverage, so 3 rotations have resident split between 2 faculty, residents didn’t like this, nor do I. If someone’s on vacation, you cover that service on your faculty’s research day (boo). You can see, not set up for academic pursuits.

    My Two Cents: Decent program in great city. Didactics seemed to now be strong, not so in past. Good training for private practice. Not convinced you could build a CV here to get top, or even middle-tier, academic jobs. No real support for bench research, which is a shame given access to Fred Hutch. If you want PP, will be happy here in both program & city though.
  4. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Not sure about Houston. Insufferable heat for 4-5 months. Sprawl, sprawl, sprawl. Good restaurants. Good for families, buy nice house easily on resident salary. Mixed reports on single scene. MDACC itself is in massive medical center of like 15 hospitals, biggest medical campus in the world, truly impressive.

    Faculty: Don’t need to say much here. All the big names. 3-8 attendings for each anatomic site. Wow. All seemed pretty nice. Enjoyed Buchholz, the chair of the clinical division (Cox is chair of department, oversees physics, clinic, & radbio divisions). Good mix as far as where faculty are from (i.e. they’re not wearing cowboy hats).

    Residents: 20 residents. Very friendly, lots of Ph.Ds. Seemed very happy. Don’t seem to get worked too hard on most rotations. All under one roof, tight-knit.

    Department/Program: Wow. Seeing proton facility was really cool, they use it for prostate 40-50% of cases to pay bills, the rest for Peds (almost all cases) & a few other uses. Very beautiful facilities overall. Rad Oncs are only residents at MDACC, they seemed to like this as they are taking consults from faculty & therefore feel part of the care, respected, need to be on the ball etc. More clinical projects than you can shake a stick at, & getting them done seems very easy with mucho help drafting manuscripts, making posters etc. All residents get a laptop, lots of vacation & good travel support. Radbio division has been without a chair for awhile, not sure why, but they admit this has stagnated. They will support up to a year out for lab research project, but want a “promise” you’ll thereafter go into academics, not just work on your golf game for a year. Otherwise seem OK if you go private, not ostracized from the MDACC family.

    My Two Cents: As everyone else says, best program in the country, unless maybe you want to be basic scientist. Houston seemed tolerable enough, very easy/cheap living, as a trade-off for the tremendous facilities/training. Would advise against playing a musical instrument for your interview 5-minute “talk.”
  5. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Suprisingly kinda liked Milwaukee. Downtown was actually lively there on the weekend. Very livable, residents all seemed to buy. During summer lake is supposed to come alive, and have a huge 3-week long music festival called summerfest bringing in top acts. Brewers, brats, beer.

    Faculty: 12-13 faculty, met 5 of them. All very nice, but stiff. A few biggish names in different fields that do oral board examining & on RTOG committees etc, with a lot of younger faculty coming from MCOW. What do I mean stiff—prog. coord. told us that women were absolutely expected to wear skirts/dresses, not slacks. Big problems if med students had nose rings. Faculty wasn’t old & cute enough for this to be considered a cute personality quirk—it was annoying, unapologetic, and added to a certain feel of stodginess.

    Residents: 8 strong. All very nice, mostly married, and the one single one took almost too much “playful” teasing from program coordinator. All were happy with program, some not so much with MKE.

    Department/Program: Nice facilities, with new cancer center coming on line this spring. Of note, all this changes is the location of their consults, the LINACs still all in old facility, which is attached to new and feels plenty nice & new itself. Tomo, GK, plenty of toys. Residents have to cover 2 attendings who do different disease sites, which I don’t find ideal. Little-to-no protected time in week for resident research or reading, and no dedicated research months. Bench work not feasible. Didactics seemed plenty & well-structured. Rotate at VA (residents liked) and a private hospital (not liked), 3 months each I think. Strong free-standing peds hospital, residents don’t need to do away rotations at all.

    My Two Cents: Solid clinical training, some decent clinical research with fairly large physics program. Felt a little service-oriented for my tastes. Attendings & residents not on first-name basis, but cordial and no tensions detected. Good salary & travel support/perks. MKE not a problem. Upper middle-tier. I put it above Pitt, below CCF.
  6. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Madison is a very nice little Midwest city. Consistently ranked as a best-city for families, lots of culture and things to do (for its size). Unsure about single scene as it's a college-town, but otherwise good if you like the change of seasons. Program must hate that they have to bring interviewees in during January. Lakes supposedly great for the summer.

    Faculty: 7 faculty, with 8 residents, so one-on-one coverage. Means residents can have quite a bit of time for research depending on attendings’ travel & protected academic time. Uniformly interesting & friendly, seem very invested in the residency. Mehta (former chair, stepped down voluntarily) & Harari (chair) are 2 of the most friendly, supportive big names that I came across.

    Residents: 8 strong. 1 md/ph.d. All married except one I think. Only 1 female, but one of the pgy-1’s is female, was with us for interview day. Like the faculty, maybe the friendliest, happiest group I saw. They all came to the dinner, and 4-5 stayed quite late with us at the bar to watch the national championship football game, with plenty of beer consumed (on a Monday night no less). On first name basis with ALL the faculty. Get 6 months research time, this seemed flexible. In past residents have extended training by a year to go into Harari’s lab (dept. funds it) for 18 months.

    Department/Program: Small but have all the toys. Expanding into new adjacent facility to be completed (late ’08?) by the time we’d be there, adding 9 exam rooms, 2 vaults. Remodeling the existing portion, which wasn’t dingy, but felt pretty sterile. Two tomo units. Residents don’t go away for rotations routinely, get all their numbers. Free-standing children’s hospital, sufficient yet not huge peds volume. The included intern year one resident per year gets seemed very well-structured, oncology-focused, well-liked by the one guy who has completed it & the girl in it now. Harari’s been chair for about a year, and is stressing biology (Mehta stressed clinical/technology research) with 6 new hires (2 physician scientists, 4 basic scientists?) apparently part of his chair package. Have one of the few residencies for medical physicists, so lots of physics research ongoing with opportunities for residents there too.

    My Two Cents: Top-tier program. Home of Tomo development, strong clinical/technology research historically, and now expanding the biology side. With new clinic space & more biologists moving into the under-construction research complex, should only be on the rise. If you’re OK with Madison, hard to think of a better place to train outside top 3-4 programs.
  7. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Very similar to Cleveland. Cheap, livable, but most amenities of big city. Learn to love the Steelers. Not much going on downtown. Talked to some people who gave the slight edge to Cleveland as a city, if that tells you anything. Nice people.

    Faculty: 6-7 faculty, only met 4 of them. Cover 3 sites, faculty are set at one spot, so not a lot of mingling. Nice folks, community program feel from most. Dr. Herron is vice-chair, impressive. Greenberger is chair, but totally detached. Didn’t meet him, but you don’t rotate with him as resident. Strange. Got the feeling he didn’t care about residents at all, maybe didn’t even know there names.

    Residents: 4 currently, expanding to 6. Nice people, on the quiet side. Mostly happy with program. Newer program, all grads have went private, though they say they want to train academics.

    Department/Program: Cover 3 sites—I’m not a fan of that for a smaller program. Big beef?—Horrible interview day. No program overview, no website, no informational packet. Literally walk into first interview knowing nothing about program despite your best efforts. Furthermore, spread out five 15-minute interviews from 9-4, leaving a good 5 hours of downtime with nothing to do. Soured me on the place, came across as a lack of interest in applicants. Otherwise, have Cyberknife & GammaKnife, decent resources & physical facilities.

    My Two Cents: Middle-tier program not living up to potential given the resources of the truly impressive UPMC system. Fine training if you want private practice.
  8. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Didn’t get a good look at New Haven. All but one resident lived in burbs & commuted in. Not much of a single, downtown-type scene from what I sensed. Maybe not the safest city, might especially be a consideration for women looking for a nightlife. Train to NYC is 1 hour 40 minutes.

    Faculty: Large department, especially on the radiobiology side. Didn’t meet many of them, but Dr. Wilson was extremely energetic & personable. Knew all applicants names without intro—obviously spent time pouring over applications. Dr. Glazer is chair, very successful lab, pleasant. Didn’t get the Ivy league attitude I might have expected to see.

    Residents: 9 spots I think. Smart & friendly group, all seemed very happy with program. Only 1 person taking advantage of strong lab presence in the department. Mostly (all?) married. Hard to get any complaints from them about the program.

    Department/Program: Spend 9 months working at satellite clinics located 45 minutes away. Residents didn’t mind this, get a lot of independence while still working with Yale faculty, who also rotate out to satellites for coverage—not working with non-academically minded docs while at satellites. One potential downside—cover the services for more than one attending, both at satellite & at home base. Overall though workload seemed moderate. No need to go away for any rotations, but Peds is barely sufficient. 9-12 months dedicated research type. Also, availability for 1 resident per class to do Robert Wood Johnson clinical trial program, 6 months of classes with residents from other field—a strong opportunity for academicians.

    My Two Cents: Top-tier academic program with good leadership, excellent training. Not the best location, as not much for single types or the spouses of married folks (small, few jobs). New cancer center is being built, open in ’09 (saw the beams going up) and will only help the ascent of the program.
  9. yeasterbunny

    yeasterbunny crazy in the coconut

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    Ok, here we go. Sorry mine are shorter and not so well organized. I should have taken better notes at the interviews.

    MCW:
    My home program, I'll start here. Of course rotating through here and loving it was a big part of convincing me to go into radonc, so it makes sense that I love just about everything about this program. I have always said, for a "midtier" program, they have one of the most all-star groups of faculty you will find. Most of them could easily move on and take positions at more prestigious locations but they love working together so they stay put. They are all great about resident education and research. Dr. Lawton is just about the friendliest PD around and genuinely invested in the residents. Dr. Wilson, the chair, is great too though he is getting on in years and will likely retire sometime soon (though I think rumors like that have been going around for a while and it still hasn't happened yet). The technology is great, they are getting an MR-sim this year and already have tomo, gamma knife, SBRT, respiratory gating, cone-beam and CT-on-rails. Gyn and prostate brachy are very strong as also is peds with the children's hospital on campus. You also spend time at the VA and a few months at a community hospital nearby. Milwaukee is a great mid-size midwestern city. There is lots to do but without the big-city traffic, and of course if there's something you can't find here, Chicago is only 1 ½ hours down the road. The cold is tempered a little by the lake, but it's still not going to be the best location for you if you don't like winters. Another possible downside is that you generally work with two attendings at once, although the clinic schedule is such that only one of them is really ever in clinic at a given time so you aren't really being pulled in two directions at once. Also, let me clear up once and for all that the skirts-dress-code for female residents WAS an official policy once but has since been abolished.


    Mayo Rochester:
    Much has been said about these big name programs, so I'll keep it short and focus on the programs with fewer posts. I did my away rotation here so I got to know the department pretty well. Your research opportunities here will be endless. Supposedly the proton facility has been approved and is on its way, although Dr. Brown told me that he had mixed feelings about the residents spending too much of their time there when there is so much other stuff to learn. They also just got the Perfexion and have IORT. One thing that can be a little scary about this program is the morning conference, which is very intense and you are really expected to know the literature inside and out, but it is more of a resident-on-resident pimping than attending-on-resident, and all the residents know the rules and don't take it personally in grilling each other. Rochester is not as bad as everyone says...I'll leave it at that. No seriously, great place for a family and lots of good fishing nearby which is important to me.


    Cleveland Clinic:
    Again, this has been discussed at length. The teaching style is much like Mayo's, very intense, but more attending-on-resident. The included prelim year is supposed to be fairly rough, yet all the residents swore that they were glad to have done it that way. They do give you more oncology-relevant rotations and surgery than your average medicine prelim, really making it more like a rigorous TY. I think. 9-10 months research.


    Johns Hopkins:
    Another great program, with very strong basic science and physics opportunities. Much has been said about Dr. DeWeese, which I would agree with, he was great. Other faculty were also nice. Scut level somewhat high, as has been discussed. 6- 12(?) months research. Baltimore is perhaps not the prettiest place I interviewed. I really liked the program overall though.


    University of Miami/Jackson Memorial:
    I agree with what has been said about this program. A smaller program, all the residents were happy here. Faculty were mostly nice but they were looking for a chair. Having a private cancer center across the street from public Jackson, they see a good range of cases with an even split between the two hospitals. I think lots of more advanced stuff, especially cervix, comes up from the caribbean to Jackson. Lotsa peds also, good head and neck, sarcoma. Prostate brachy was the weakness most people said they wished they could get more experience with. Busy days, but with an academic day during the week. The physics interview here was a little crazy, with such "let's see how you think" questions as "how many piano tuners are there in NYC? how many people die every day in the world? how far can you see to the horizon from an airplane at cruising altitude?" Miami traffic reminded me of South America.


    Mayo Jax:
    Also a small program and fairly young, but the residents all seemed to like it. Also chairless at the time I interviewed. Away rotations at Wash U for Gyn, and they weren't sure at the time where they would be going for peds. 6 months of dedicated research time. The new hospital was nearly done when I interviewed and supposedly was equipped for IORT. The TY is basically included if you want it, which is cool; they do the TY interview the same day. I liked this program, but was unhappy about their interviewing 40 people for 1 spot.


    Loyola:
    I left this program not very excited, but mostly because I don't really have any interest in moving to Chicago. The program seemed pretty good. They do a month off-site but I think in town for GYN and a month at St. Jude's for peds. They had a couple slightly more odd attendings but not really unfriendly. I believe they typed all their notes rather than dictating. Oh yeah, the interview day was horribly unorganized and ran very long, despite the fact that a blizzard was beginning outside and many of us were eager to get on the road.


    Ohio State:
    This is one of seemingly many programs that interviewed me which has recently had some rough times but is moving in the right direction over the last couple years. Dr. Lo, the PD, seemed very resident-friendly, as well as the chair, Dr. Mayr; most of the other attendings are new within the last 2 years. A small program, only 4 residents. Research opportunities are a bit more limited here. Perhaps 10% of the patients coming in are from the prison, which is a bit unique. I believe the residents get football tickets guaranteed. Housing is cheap and Columbus (and especially the area surrounding OSU) had a fun college-town feel.


    University of Minnesota:
    This was a program I knew little about prior to my visit, but was very impressed by on interview day. Everyone was cool here and more laid-back than most places. Well-rounded training including a VA. There was also talk of organizing international rotations in places like Mexico and Tanzania, which would be extremely cool. Strong physics department with lots of enthusiasm for physics research. They were currently looking for a radiobiologist. There was also no CT-sim at the time I interviewed, which I thought was very weird, but supposedly that will be in place before the beginning of residency.


    Indiana University:
    Likewise I was somewhat surprised here by how much I liked this program. The new chair, Dr. Johnstone, was one of the cooler chairmen of any of the places I visited. Like Miami, they have a private and a county hospital, so the range of cases is good. They also rotate at the proton facility 50 minutes away in Bloomington. Peds and Gyn are strong, not as much prostate though but increasing. Housing is cheap in Indy and I think everyone owns.


    Henry Ford:
    Detroit was also not high on my list of places I've always wanted to live. This program was pretty good though, especially some of the radbio stuff going on by a particularly enthusiastic radiobiologist. Dr. Movsas and others are doing interesting gene therapy stuff. Strong SBRT. Decent exposure except no peds. Also, currently looking for Gyn staff, so that's in a lull right now too. They do have a moderate amount of pimping though not malignant. Most of the residents seemed very happy, but there was this one resident who gave us such memorable quotes as, "they treat us like small children," "the teaching is woefully inadequate," and, regarding morning conference, "don't fall for that dog-and-pony show; morning conference is usually nothing like that." But I didn't really get this feeling from the other residents so maybe this was just one really pessimistic resident.


    Wayne State:
    Again, not thrilled about Detroit, but this program was better than I expected. Everyone was very laid-back. A good amount of HDR and peds, as well as tomo and a spooky old cyclotron which hasn't been used for a while, which they literally showed us with a flashlight because even the lights in there didn't work anymore. 3-6 months protected research. Attendings were nice for the most part. They are currently chairless. The department is accessed by a system of tunnels between the hospitals that reminded me of waiting in line for Space Mountain.


    University of Louisville:
    You know how they say it should be a huge red flag if they don't give you time alone with the residents? I sorta thought that scenario was a myth before my visit here. But the one resident who was released from clinic to come to lunch with us was not really free to be frank with us for most of the time because one of the attendings came too. When we did get a moment alone with him in the car on the way back from lunch, he said that they are definitely very busy, with a high level of scut, long hours, and poor didactics, but he insisted that it was not malignant and that he was happy there. One of the attendings, on the other hand basically told us all during interviews and during the debriefing that the residents were all somewhat unhappy. Others I talked to on the interview trail said they did get to talk to the other residents, and were told they were unhappy. Needless to say I was disappointed, but I still ranked them.


    Thomas Jefferson:
    After having read all that has been said about this program, I almost cancelled my interview, and when I did go I expected to see malignancy just dripping from the walls. I was surprised, however, to really not get any sense of malignancy whatsoever. Like many of the places I went, the residents spoke of busy clinic and moderately long hours, but overall good teaching. There was one interview I was not impressed by, which has been written about previously, in which the attending was totally disinterested and basically struggled to stay awake the whole time. Also, they are currently chairless with the departure of Dr. Curran, so who knows how things will change in the next few years. Otherwise, I thought the program was fine, and Philly is a great location. I ended up ranking them much higher than I expected to.


    UVA:
    I ended up really loving this program. Part of it was the fact that like 18 inches of snow had fallen the previous day at home and it was really nice in Charlottesville. The program itself reminded me of MCW in a lot of ways, everyone was really nice and laid-back, but enthusiastic about teaching. They don't have automatically dedicated time for research but said that it could easily be arranged. The department is currently pretty old and worn down but they have a new cancer center going up which is supposed to open in late '09 or early ‘10. Two (?) Trilogies going in there, they currently have Tomo and lots of HDR cases, Perfexion gamma knife. They rotate at a satellite about 35 minutes away. Peds didn't sound particularly strong but they split up the cases among themselves and don't typically have to go elsewhere, and they are hoping to get some peds heme-onc people in the new center which should attract a few more cases. Charlottesville is a pretty small town, but with enough to do because of the big undergrad program. Housing is on the expensive side for such a small place, sounded pretty comparable to suburban Milwaukee. Overall though a nice location with a great program.
  10. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Hospital itself is right by UPenn undergrad campus, but apparently University City isn’t best part of Philly. Doesn’t matter though, with good public transportation most residents live downtown and bus/train to work, no need for a car. Plus for me. Philly is so close to NYC, DC, Jersey shore for weekends. Airport close to downtown, literally from my hotel room to my gate in 45 minutes. Philly itself seems livable, with all big-city amenities. People aren’t too nice or good-looking though--blame the cheesesteaks.

    Faculty: Very strong. May not have quite the big names of MDACC, MSKCC, but didn’t detect any egos. Tremendous mentors for those going into academia. Dr. Hahn was awesome to talk with, Dr. Kao seemed very open to providing capable residents with techs in a lab to help w/ projects. Residents did say there is one unpleasant faculty to work with, but otherwise were very high on their faculty across the board. No detection of “East-coast, Ivy-league” type superiority here.

    Residents: The couple I got to talk to in-depth were so much fun to chat with. Great senses of humor, clearly happy and very intelligent. A large group that is centrally located at one site for the most part (2 at VA rotation at a time?) so they seemed tight-knit.

    Department/Program: New dept. actually under construction set to open in summer ’08, with protons to follow, realistically to treat first proton patient fall/winter ’09. Big program, no need to worry about lack of exposure to any technique or patient type. New facility should be world-class, let alone w/ addition of protons. Clinic load likely mid now, probably high once in new center given increase in pts.

    My Two Cents: Tremendous program on upward trajectory with new facility. Going to be expanding faculty & patient load, so plenty of opportunity for clinical research. Great radiobiology. Pretty good location. Best part—really nice, happy people in the program.
    Downside—some may not like required prelim year. Do get 3 months of electives (unlike categorical IM interns), 2- 2 week vacation blocks as intern.
  11. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Dallas seemed +/-. Sprawled, but supposedly “Uptown” neighborhood very close to hospital has a walkable, downtown feel/scene for singles. Didn’t see it. It’s a big city, but maybe a bit of a cowboy mentality? Was told people are very into keeping their cars new & shiny. Not really my priority, but whatever. Not gonna find outdoor activities here, drive 3-4 hours to find some natural landscape worth hiking/climbing/biking around.

    Faculty: 12ish clinicians. All under one roof. Hak Choy was very impressive, has pushed massive expansion of this department since ’03, with strong institutional support. Other faculty have private practice feel, except Timmerman, big SBRT name, very academically productive.

    Residents: 6 for now, but pushing for expansion, definitely have the volume for more spots given rapid expansion of faculty. Only last couple came thru match, so makeup will be different in a couple years after Choy gets the type (research-heavy) that he wants. Seemed happy, little scutwork, average hours.

    Department/Program: Beautiful, newish, stand-alone Rad Onc facility, with labs under the department roof. Strong radiobiology division, historically much stronger than clinic, though clinic is now catching up. Weak physics, though new head physics guy has been hired, coming in summer ’08. Didactics sounded strong. All the Peds you need. I believe in Choy’s vision, and dept. seems to have very strong institutional support (faculty—clinic, physics, bio--expansion from like 15 to 40 over last 4-5 years!). 6 months protected research time, I think willing to go to a year if one wants a lab project (very available with large RadBio division).

    My Two Cents: Up & coming program in decent location. Feel one could walk in now & chum up with Choy & Timmerman & be very productive academically as resident, but no one has yet really taken advantage of this (to the stated frustration of Choy). No doubt training is solid. A bit of a risk given short history, but a risk I’d be happy to take. With 1-2 more faculty who are truly academic, this may soon be top 10-ish program given resources in place.
  12. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: St. Louis is a very midwestern city. Get the feeling that people stay here, but very little influx of people from other areas of the country, save residents. Very affordable, even single residents can buy. Barnes-Jewish hospital is massive, located in central west end, which is a trendy area good for single residents. Great housing opportunities for families close (10 min drive) to hospital.

    Faculty: 10 full time clinical faculty. Apparently they hide Grigsby (most prolific publisher, gyn-machine) from applicants b/c he’s gruff, but residents say he’s OK to work with & gives them numerous projects. PD was very quiet, strange for that position. A few other established faculty that seemed nice & academically productive. Unfortunately this crew won’t be getting any upgrades (not that its needed) or fresh blood in the near future with no chair for the dept.

    Residents: 14 spots, even though only 10 faculty, as all PG4’s get full year off for research, no questions asked. One of the few programs that dedicated to their residents academic time. Mostly married (as with all programs), lots of kids, a few singles. Smart, friendly, maybe on the quiet/reserved side. Seemed very happy with program & life in St. Louis. Attendance to pre-interview dinner was poor by residents, for what that’s worth.

    Department/Program: Very nice, newish facilities. All under one roof, get all the peds, gyn etc that you need for #’s. As stated, get whole year for research. Many did lab project, can go outside dept, which is probably best as the near/intermediate future of radiobiology section may be in question with Powell’s departure. Barnes is massive hospital, acts as county hospital, so great patient mix. Heavy volume, but residents work very reasonable hours, maybe even lightish. All the toys one could want, with protons to be up by summer ’09 (however, unlike Penn, no ground has been broken, not very convinced here). Protons to be a small experimental unit, not massive accelerator. We’ll see. Very strong physics, with med physics residency, great imaging studies with Mallinckrodt support. $2500 per year “education fund” to be used for books, computers, conferences, whatever. Wow.

    My Two Cents: Top-10 program in OK location. Residents very happy. No BS like getting pulled from academic day to cover other services. No rotations covered 2 attendings. Strong physics & clinical research, with good opportunity given for lab work. Support Holman pathway. Residents all said malignancy is a historical artifact, I believe them. Can’t go wrong with this program, hope they find another strong chair soon
  13. yeasterbunny

    yeasterbunny crazy in the coconut

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    By the way, no one here calls it "MCOW" although it's obviously appropriate for the dairy state. We all say MCW. It wasn't until the interview trail that I realized everyone else was calling us something else.
  14. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Palo alto. Expensive, beautiful weather. One faculty member x 7 yrs is still renting. College town, and lots of rich folks from Silicon valley. Snobby bar scene, hope you like $12 glasses of wine, not $4 beers.

    Faculty: 12 full-time clinical faculty. A couple new young dynamic attendings have balanced out what maybe was a top-heavy (aka old) group. Half are MD-Ph.D, though I think only 2-3 have labs. Pretty friendly group, academically serious. Very Stanford inbred.

    Residents: 13 residents. Mostly married, 1 single guy. Most if not all have ties to Bay area. 1/2-ish have Ph.Ds. Friendly, bright, seemed pretty happy. Complain about the amount of scutwork (finding charts, other BS) that keeps them there late at night. One student who rotated there said at times she was there past 9:00 working with still a couple residents. Have to cover 2 faculty often as many residents in lab or on electives.

    Department/Program:
    Very nice facilities in building 4-5 years old. All the toys, 2 cyberknifes. Get 10-12 months of research, great cancer biology programs to do lab work in. Can also choose to get MPH or do clinical electives. 1 month prostate brachy rotation at outreach facility, 1 month dosimetry rotation.

    My Two Cents: Top-10 program in beautiful location, though not really a city. Residents happy, but wonder if it’s b/c they all seemed very intent on being in Bay area, and in spite of significant scut. Support Holman, good place if you’re into biology.
  15. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: I like the Twin cities. Very clean, lots to do. Not a huge downtown population, but growing urban community/warehouse district. Beautiful girls of Scandinavian descent, tall & blonde, if you’re into that kind of thing. Cold.

    Faculty: Don’t like to be too harsh, but it was a struggle to stay awake. The physics interview was nice, as stated before, but downhill from there. When asked about vision for dept., chair said “Well, we’re gonna start covering another community hospital with residents.” PD reminded me of Milton from Office Space, & was quite proud that he had stripped nearly all didactics out of the program. One faculty member struggled to conduct the interview, even though he was reading his questions verbatim. The lack of formal didactics might actually be a good thing.

    Residents: 6 residents. Very nice, laid back. Complained about lack of didactics. They get one 1 hour lecture/week, questionable quality. They like the fact that they get out quite early, 4:30 to 5 pm-ish.

    Department/Program: Old facilities. CT simulator is a converted diagnostic machine, not a real dedicated CT sim, if that tells you something. Have Tomo unit. Rotate at a community hospital and at VA. Actually a fairly decent physics department, but no radiobiology. Up to 6 months for research, but to be honest not sure how one would spend it. When asked it comes out that 2 recent grads have been unable to pass boards after multiple attempts, and others have passed after having to retake portions.

    My Two Cents: Disappointing program. Have family there, was hoping to like it. More concerning than the weakness was the lack of awareness & sense of complacency. Interested in academia—don’t waste the trip. Ranked it, but last.
  16. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: Boston is pretty awesome. Cold, but one of the few really cool cities with a great program. Both program locations (Longwood, MGH) accessible by their subway (the T) so don’t need a car. Or live near one spot, use shuttle to the other one (15-20 min).

    Faculty: Dynamic faculty at both locations. Big names all around, and seemingly pretty friendly. Residents say there is rivalry between faculty (MGH vs BI, BWH, Farber) but it actually may benefit them as they both want to be seen as the better teachers. Given split in residency, must be proactive about finding mentor or you can slip thru cracks.

    Residents: Take 7 per year. Nice group. Harris explicitly shoots for ½ male, ½ female, ½ Ph.D vs not, ½ Harvard grads vs outsiders. Residents get a full year for research, can use this for bench work, clinical research, getting a MPH, or some mix. Opportunities abound, residents seemed to take full advantage.

    Department/Program: Oddly no tour was offered of any buildings, but not too worried. During residency, spend ½ time at Longwood campus (Beth Israel, Brigham Women’s, & Dana Farber), ½ at Mass General (which includes a 3 month rotation at Boston University Hospital, staffed by MGH faculty, as well as Children’s). This large # of facilities can be a downer, as you never really get comfortable anywhere, & don’t really have a home base during residency. Longwood time seems pretty chill, with plenty of time to read, one-on-one resident to attending services. At MGH work very hard, cover 2-3 attendings, lots of scut, work til 7-8 pm most nights. Residents didn’t seem to mind.

    My Two Cents: Obviously top-notch. Residents have their pick of academic jobs. Pros: Great location, tons of opportunities with full research year, Harvard name, great mentors, program extremely invested in residents, take lots of pride in program. Cons: Long days at MGH, coverage of numerous locations, expensive city.
  17. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Location: San Fran, enough said. Twain was right when he said "The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco" but otherwise it doesn't get much better than this. Had way too much fun the night before the interview thanks to an interview trail buddy, hope the residents and faculty couldn't tell :D. Expensive, but worth it.

    Faculty: A few very dynamic young attendings, but all the applicants were turned off by one attending who was combative during interviews. Roach seemed pleasant, maybe a little hard to read, but enough has been said on this board about him by people with much more knowledge. Liked the PD quite a bit.

    Residents: Suprisingly didn't interact with them a whole lot, but got to talk to that Gfunk6 guy at dinner. All seemed very happy, get out of work plenty early (5 pm) enough to enjoy the city. Know a girl who rotated there and she couldn't say enough about how cool they were.

    Department/Program: Was perhaps a little underwhelmed given the reputation. Got the impression that the faculty wasn't overly invested in the resident education, that you need to teach yourself. Residents seemed OK with this, as they have the time for it, but you better be a self-starter. Get 11 months research/electives, but can't put those months into significant blocks. Residents mentioned that research machine isn't well-oiled, must construct own databases, etc. On the plus side, they have SPORE grants in breast, prostate, & CNS, so you know there are serious academics going on here, just not sure how accessible to residents. Covering two sites didn't seem to be a big issue.

    My Two Cents: Strong program in awesome location. On merits alone, think one might be able to find 10 programs better-suited for training academicians. No doubt clinical training is strong with good pt diversity and respected attendings to learn from. On reputation no doubt you get top private jobs, work with cool co-residents, and can have a great time during residency.
  18. Gfunk6

    Gfunk6 Troublemaker Moderator Lifetime Donor

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    That "Gfunk6 guy" ;) thanks you for your honest, forthright, and prompt (!!!) program reviews.
    Since interview time, one resident was officially selected for the Holman pathway. Another is applying in 1.5 months.
  19. RadOncRudy

    RadOncRudy

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    I'll try to cover some of those programs not already commented on...
    MCV-VCU

    Location: The medical campus is located downtown and Richmond was beautiful. If I remember correctly Richmond is only 1.5hrs away from DC if you need to be near big city culture.

    Faculty: Overall I thought that the faculty were very nice and certainly were quite aware that candidates had concerns regarding their lack of matching anyone last year. Dr. Chang is the PD and addressed these concerns off the bat. He seems genuinely interested in keeping the residents happy and making sure that they get protected didactic time. Dr. Anscher is the new chair and seemed very approachable and interested in having patients be involved in research.

    Residents: The residents were very candid about what happened last year, but made it very clear that they are much happier now. They said that they now have friday afternoons reserved for didactics or studying. They are much happier with their work load and say that all concerns they had last year have been addressed and resolved. Seem like a very happy, nice bunch. Most are married with families from what I remember.

    Department/Program: They seemed to have good equipment, including a Trilogy. Residents were very happy with Brachy training, especially prostate-they seem to be as independent as possible as the VA with these procedures. There is protected research time, I think was at least 6 months (?) Residents spend decent amount of time at the VA (about 15 min car ride away) and smaller amount of time at a satellite facility, pretty much private practice and pretty cush from what I remember.

    My two cents: I was surprised at how much I liked this program. I thought the residents really did seem to be happy with all issues resolved. As was mentioned here before, it was a 2 day interview this year, not sure if they'll continue it this way. The first day with presentations, a tour of Richmond & the VA and satellite, then a cocktail hour and dinner with the faculty and residents followed by time alone with the residents. The second day was the actual interview day. The interviews were only 15 minutes each and each person had a designated "behavior" question. They really did not even ask about research, etc. it was really only "what would you do if"...so if you interview here, know your strengths & weaknesses, etc...basically all those questions in Iserson's that almost no other rad onc program asks.
  20. SimulD

    SimulD Senior Member

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    The one thing I would like to say is that there is no way that Cleveland is a better city than Pittsburgh.

    Official Rust Belt/Middle Midwest Cities Ranking:

    Pittsburgh > Columbus > Cincinnati > Cleveland > Detroit >> Erie/Buffalo

    S
  21. cgk

    cgk Member

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    Does anyone have a critique regarding the program at the NIH/NCI?
  22. Impressions

    Impressions Removed

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    Location:
    Agree, mostly. While not Center City, the area right around Penn campus is fine (and patrolled by police at night) even as you push deeper into West Philly. Cheesesteaks?! Uh, there are definitely hotties on/around Penn campus...just venture beyond the medical complex, shop or have lunch around Walnut, or go workout at Pottruck. And, Philly boasts the critically acclaimed Pennsylvania Ballet for you, cancerdancer, 'nuff said.

    Faculty:
    Likely the best mix of teaching philosophies, personalities, and charming idiosyncrasies I encountered on the radonc trail.

    Residents:
    Yes, definitely a chill and diverse bunch. Unfortunately there have been rumors regarding the resident workrooms and work schedule. The cramped resident workrooms may not be upgraded or relocated despite the new facilities. This might mean inefficiency. Imagine having to hike between the old and new buildings multiple times daily. There was also talk regarding the possibility of residents working on Saturdays...and someone mentioned to me that Penn supposedly treats from 5am to 10pm already. Lastly, the prospect of a required prelim medicine year is somewhat of a bummer after visiting so many temptingly cush TY programs. I definitely feel guilty about this issue.

    Patients:
    Philadelphia + surrounding metro area + remote referrals + Children's Hospital of PA = exceptionally varied and diverse in regard to demographics and disease sites/stages.

    Upgrades/tech:
    New facility in 2009ish and protons are a major attraction. However, for sure there will be numerous transitional issues associated with moving into the new facility...many of which undoubtedly will fall onto the shoulders of the residents. EMR as of Fall 2007 rather clunky, but at least not DOS-based. Patient paper charts frequently not completed by secretaries, requiring residents to fumble-and-print from EMR to fill in holes. I think I remember hearing about 2008 EMR upgrade to Epic, which would be a huge relief.


  23. Impressions

    Impressions Removed

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    Yes, could it be that the Twin Cities has the most true blondes per capita of any major metropolitan US city? And, don't forget the all those beautiful Somali and Hmong ladies in Minneapolis-St Paul!
  24. yeasterbunny

    yeasterbunny crazy in the coconut

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    C'mon, there are only three people with impressions? This thread is like the most useful part of the entire forum. I have only stuck around because I felt duty-bound to contribute after studying the previous impression posts for so long.
  25. OmarLittle

    OmarLittle

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    I have used this post many times in the past. I will definitely contribute my own impressions once match day has passed. I think many people are waiting to post comments until then.
  26. yeasterbunny

    yeasterbunny crazy in the coconut

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    I don't really see what difference it makes now that the lists are in. I guess maybe if I had more negative things to say I would wait.
  27. stephew

    stephew SDN Super Moderator Moderator Emeritus

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    Protons should not be a major attractive feature to a program. its a nice semi-boutique feature, but you shouldnt be too dazzeled by funky technology.
  28. stephew

    stephew SDN Super Moderator Moderator Emeritus

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    you can post impressions under the impressions account- IF ITS NOT ABUSED- if you are concerned about privacy. (see sticky).
  29. Impressions

    Impressions Removed

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    Location: Tampa is a nice city with some amenities of a larger city, but definitely has more of a suburban feel. Driving distance to Orlando and Miami. Great beaches nearby in St. Petersburg and Clearwater. Seems like it would be more suited for someone who isn't single. Weather is a plus except for those nasty hurricanes.

    Faculty: Strong across the board. Many have been recuited only within the past several years by the chair, Dr. Stevens. Dr. Harris was the former PD at Penn.

    Residents: Since this is a brand new program, there's little that the 2 current residents could talk about.

    Department/Program: New program that took all residents for 2008 and 2009 outside of the match this year. Dr. Stevens' vision for the program is essentially to make Moffitt as close to MDACC as possible so there will be a huge emphasis on research it sounds like. The program plans to expand a lot and potentially will have 12 total residents eventually. Excellent facilities and technology. Supposedly will be getting 2 new tomo units for a total of 3. Also have a Novalis for stereotactic stuff, which they use for cranial and some extracranial cases. Most of the time you are at Moffitt, but also rotate at the VA and Tampa General. Tenative plan to have peds rotation at All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg making outside rotations unncessary. A prelim medicine year was guaranteed this year at USF for those who were offered a position, but not sure if they will keep this next year.

    My Two Cents: This seems like a really promising program with strong leadership. Faculty and facilities all seem very solid. Great location. I did get a sense that this will be more of an academic program and that there will be an emphasis on research. Moffitt itself as an institution is a huge asset to the program because it offers great interdepartmental resources. I expect the Moffitt program to be pretty darn impressive in the next 3-5 years.
  30. Impressions

    Impressions Removed

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    Location: Chapel Hill is a great college town with a beautiful campus. The actual "city" is little more than a main street that is adjacent to the campus with a few bars, restaurants and shops. The hospital is about 1 mile from this area, surprisingly close to the football and basketball stadiums. The surrounding areas are nice, albeit spread out and probably somewhat boring for those who are unmarried and looking for mischief. Very livable overall.

    Faculty: Only a handful of faculty at this point, as the program is small. They announced the hiring of Lawrence Marks (from Duke) as chair just after I interviewed there. The current chair, Dr. Sartor, is unfortunately ill and had to step down. Dr. Rosenman served as chair during the interim and seemed nice enough. Dr. Tepper had earned the reputation of being a tough interviewer, so I was pleasantly surprised by the ease of our interview. Dr. Varia is the PD and seemed to be extremely pleasant and genuinely concerned with resident happiness. The toughest interview was probably with Dr. Morris, one of the junior faculty, only because it was a whole lot of the "what questions do you have?" deal. The radiobiologist there, Dr. Zeman, was very friendly, if not eccentric, and appears to have built their curriculum from the ground up. Physics interview was standard and they had some very impressive projects going on which were, frankly, well over my head.

    Residents: Only 4 residents, which is probably one of the the only real drawbacks to this program. Like all other programs I interviewed at, they are attempting to increase their size. All 4 seemed friendly and there didn't seem to be any glaring personality issues.

    Department/Program: Again, like every other program, a brand new cancer center is under construction and slated for completion in the summer of '09. The current facilities were standard for the most part. I don't get as worked up about equipment as some others on this board and am thus not the best person to ask regarding these things. During the first interview day, we were able to sit in on a didactic session, which was nice. It was run mostly by the attending, with a good balance of lecture and well-meaning pimping. No hint of maliciousness in the questioning and the residents seemed to feel satisfied with their education. The only current deficit that they have is prostate brachy, which is essentially absent at this time. No word on of they intend to remedy this anytime soon.

    My Two Cents: Very nice program with plenty of potential for research, both clinical and basic. Faculty and residents both seemed pleasant and happy. With the new cancer center going up and a strong hire in Dr. Marks, this appears to be a good program that is getting better.
  31. MD Helper

    MD Helper New Member

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    Chapel Hill (and the Triangle in general) is a party town. Rest assured, there is plenty of fun for single types. I believe that Forbes or US News (forget which) named the Triangle as the top place for young singles as well.

    Marks is a quality guy. Wish him all the best in this move.
  32. Impressions

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    Mayo-Jax
    Strengths: Exceptionally nice and welcoming faculty. Put you up in a hotel. New faculty with new physicist from UF. Access to the Mayo system. Can go scuba diving with near beaches. New hospital.
    Weaknesses: Need to go elsewhere for peds. ? re sufficient volume. Young program. Only 1 spot.
    Neutral: Jax as a city. Not a big name but would prob help for both academic and private jobs. Most people will prob go private.
    Overall: Good program. Could be happy as a resident. Decent training. Ranked despite fact only 1 in 40 chance of getting position.

    U Chicago
    Strenghts: Hellman, Weichselbaum, best program in Chicago IMHO. Great job placement in both academics and pvt practice. Will know your stuff when you complete. Research time at end where people can do research abroad. Big link to UCSD.
    Weaknesses: rumors re. unhappiness from residents--though no first hand experiences. double cover. You know your stuff b/c you have to for morning conference.
    Neutral: Chicago as a city. windy and cold. (but home of the Blues Brothers)
    Overall: Best program in Chicago. Vies for best program in midwest w/ Michicgan and Wisconsin. Ranked highly.

    U Michigan
    Strengths: Lawrence (Chair) and Ben-Josef (PD) are strong. Good placement in both academic (esp) and private (of late). Good volume. Excellent at 3d confromal / IMRT / physics huge strength. Ann ARbor.
    Weaknesses: Ann Arbor. Cold. Rough intern year associated with it. Very little brachy experience. PRoductive res's but strangely this year's gorup going private.
    Neutral: Ann Arbor.
    Overall: PRobably best progr in Michigan. Again, vies for top in region. Can you handle the intern year? Ranked highly.

    U Wisconsin
    Strengths: Harari (Chair) and Mehta (former chair) and really well-liked and productive faculty. If you like tomo this is the place for you. very comfortable with industry. did i mention tomo x2 (but it still breaks down even in Madison)? Great interview day w/ nice dinner and nice bunches of people. No push for either academic or private. Feeling that dept will back up either way. Recent grad went to Joint Center. Madison is fun. Get good training w/ brachy also from PD.
    Weaknesses: Madison is cold. Good rep of the badgers but not quite the same rep as Harvard or perhaps Chicago.
    Neutral: Do you like Brett Favre? Do you like wearing a foam yellow wedge shaped hat of cheese? Do you like the cold?
    Overall: This program really surprised me. I went in thinking I would not like it that much but the people (faculty and residents) really made a very strong impression on me. I ranked this much higher than expected and would be very happy to train there. Seems that most people tend to go private instead of academic.

    Wash U
    Strengths: Lots of money for facilities. St. Louis was nicer than expected. Pretty nice residents. Good opportunities for research. Powell ramped up this program. Would receive excellent training.
    Weaknesses: Didn't meet anyone who was exceptionally excited about the program, though most people spoke well about it. Powell leaving is a loss for the program.
    Neutral: St. Louis (which I initially thought was negative)
    Overall: Another program that's very strong, sort of a rough gem. Would probably be happy training here. They have 4 spots which is really nice. Living in St. Louis could be nice.

    Beaumont
    Strengths: Chair, PD, and Vicini. Very dynamic group. Phenomenal brachy experience. Saw stuff there that was not done elsewhere. Birthplace of IGRT. Generate lots of data. Exceptionally strong physics (even without John Wong). Weird hybrid of academic / private hospital. Other places talk a lot about adaptive RT but this place does it.
    Negative: Royal Oaks. Hospital seems dated. Will have a med school associated but uncertain of caliber. TY attached. Chair is intimidating but heard he's actually a nice guy.
    Overall: Again another program that really surprised me. If given the chance, interview there. Rad Onc here really is strong and the fact that many people stay on as factuly speaks loads re. teh program. Believe this place would give exceptional triaing overall. Limited spots (2) and understanding is they do actively recruit their top candidates (no call for me).

    Southwestern
    Strengths: hak choy. super dynamic. Timmerman whom some call the father of SBRS. a program on exceptionally fast route up, but still not there quite yet.
    Weaknesses: limited number of spots. Dallas (unless you like highways).
    Overall: Think would be willing to train there, esp for SBRS. Think program favors people from own med school.

    Duke
    Strengths: Willett. Great traiing. Residents seem happy / excited to be there.
    Weaknesses: History of most residents going private but with Willett taking over things have changed. Question re. if adoption of new treatment technology lagged behind (i.e. IGRT). Durham.
    Neutral: Ability to buy a house in area.
    Overall: Thought higher of program than before went. Uncertain of living in Durham for 4 years.

    University of Washington
    Strengths: Seattle, Seattle, Seattle. Big facilities including Hutch which draws patients. Strenght in non-solid tumors.
    Weaknesses: A bit behind also in adoption of tech. Teh issue of protons seems to be floundering. Possibly lots of scut. Again UW seems to be known more for its medical oncology rather than rad onc.
    Neutral: Good job placement in academic and prviate.
    Overall: Seattle is a great town. Would consider living here for 4 years easily. Great expereinces in prostate brachytherapy (people come here for away rotations as residents for implant experience).
  33. Impressions

    Impressions Removed

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    MDACC- best training program in country IMHO. houston didn't seem too bad but then again, may be different if interview was in mid-August. faculty seemed approachable, friendly, and interested in getting to know interviewees. excellent didactics- some would even say residents are 'spoon-fed' with wealth of lectures, conferences, mentors. tremendous research opportunities with most residents having multiple publications during residency. minimal scut is definite plus. happy group of residents. really no weakness to this program except maybe lack of hardcore lab research.

    MSKCC- top notch clinical training with high volume and workload. some uncertainty with new chair situation. faculty and trainees appeared somewhat overworked, and i felt formal education perhaps took a backseat because of this. residents all were friendly, but looked tired and overworked, often staying late at night. i got the feeling that one learns here by seeing lots of patients. unsure how much of a priority is given to resident research. seems like majority of residents headed to private practice as of late.

    Stanford- beautiful cancer center with all of the technological tools. i was really impressed with the PD and she seemed genuinely interested in being a resident advocate. some of the other faculty however did not even remotely appear to be into teaching and to be honest seemed off in their own little worlds. this seemed to be echoed by the residents, some of whom were visibly unhappy with high scut. they did seem like a close knit group who helped each other out. research opportunities seem limitless with amazing radiobiology and physics. the younger faculty seem to have lots more energy and willingess to mentor the residents.

    UCSF- spent a month rotating here and have mixed feelings. has a great reputation as being on the technological forefront with excellent clinical training. the word i heard often to describe this program, however, was 'unorganized.' i was turned off by the lack of structure and guidance in this department. attending presence at am conference was zero every single day. my research talk on the last day was attended by exactly 0 attendings. clinical coverage also was scattered with residents frantically searching for materials almost right up to the patient arriving. i think because of the stressful environment and the presence of some unbearable egos, people seemed a bit more 'snappy' than at other places. resident research, i was told, was hit-or-miss, and entirely dependent on how motivated one was. i got the impression that the lack of mentorship provided by attendings was a huge weakness here. san fran is a beautiful city, but IMHO ucsf did not seem like a very resident-friendly place.

    U Washington- seemed a bit technologically outdated. lots of talk about protons though. they continue to promote neutron technology, interestingly. most faculty were cordial and pleasant. residents are scattered throughout the city at various institutions. although this enhances the breadth of the clinical experience, travel is cumbersome. i got the impression that research was not really valued here and couldnt really get a straight answer from residents about what projects they were involved with. common complaint was the residents were used as scut labor and that attendings don't respect them. nearly all residents head to private practice, most in the nw.

    U Penn- seemed like a program on the rise and invigorated. they have some dynamic, high energy faculty who take residents under their wing. i was impressed by committment to its academic mission. dedicated research time and publishing opportunities seem to be a high priority. new chair seems intent on building the academic reputation of u penn. organized didactics with a sense of collegiality that seemed missing from some other places= happy residents. physical space was a bit cramped, but this will likely change in the future with new cancer center.

    U Chicago- very strong didactics. residents here seemed more confident about their knowledge base than at any other program. presence of great mentors who play an active role in resident education is huge. i heard grumblings that the constant 'pimping' can border on malignant, but for the most part, people seemed happy here. clinically, this is a strong program with technologically-heavy experience. research is really emphasized although i was told by faculty that residents can take more initiative.
  34. Impressions

    Impressions Removed

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    SUNY Downstate
    Location: Brooklyn is a bear to get around. However, it's a hop, skip, and a train ride away from Manhattan. The hospital is in a not so hot area, which is well, not so hot. When I walked into the department it was old and there were huge lead doors and chipped paint. There are three other facilities that the residents rotate at. At least one hails to be much more aesthetically pleasing.
    Faculty: I absolutely adored Dr. Rotman. Dr. Choi as well. They try to maintain a very low-stress environment for the residents. Dr. Han, the new program director seems to foster a lot of independence.
    Residents: 3/2/2/2 rotation with two spots for '09. They seemed so laid back and well, normal. Like anyone could really fit in. Most live in Brooklyn, a few in Manhattan.
    Department: Although there is not a lot of original research going on here, you get the sense that these guys are dedicated to the advancement of the field. There are 34 protocols open here from the RTOG and other groups.
    Clinic/Research/Basic Science: There are two months for basic science in the curriculum and the opportunity for chart reviews and such. The traveling seemed more like an opportunity for well-roundedness than an inconvenience issue: Long Island College for more middle class patients, King's County for "indigent" populations, the Brooklyn VA, Beth Isreal, MSKCC for peds. Residents interact with other faculty at other sites including some well knowns at Beth Isreal (so well known, in fact, that their names escape me at the moment…no but really). Residents cover facilities and not attendings (this leaves a 2 resident/2 attending matchup most of the time but decreases the one-on-one mentorship). Physics and radiobio once a week for three years.
    My two cents: Residents are well trained here. There isn't a ton of originality but you'll definitely participate in research. But you have to be willing to do the Brooklyn thing and all that comes with it.

    University of Cincinnati
    Location: Downtown Cincinnati might just be the cleanest city I've ever seen. Residents say it's a decent place to live. The weather is northern North Carolina/northern Kentuckyish. A lot of sports going on and a large undergrad campus right by the hospital.
    Faculty: Currently there are 5 attendings, although I believe that a 6th has been recruited. This was the first place where the residents emphatically stated that they are entirely comfortable working with all of the faculty. The faculty are all involved in a number of projects and have protected time for research. Dr. Barrett is a well known name and Dr. Breneman is a big name in peds. Most faculty have been in the department for some time and ensure its stability.
    Residents: 2/1/2/1 rotation for a total of 6 with three spots for '09. These guys couldn't stop talking about how much they love the program. The environment seems great. They were less enthusiastic about the city, but not down on it at all. Many are UCers from med school. They all really like each other and seem to spend a lot of time together in the residents' room. Most live in Hyde Park.
    Department: A beautiful cancer center. Really friendly staff. New large bore CT sim. Lin Ac room with an anesthesia cart to treat peds. Dr. Breneman focuses quite a bit on peds and loves it. The residents say they all feel comfortable treating kids. Tomotherapy at the satellite office in Westchester which is supposedly even more beautiful.
    Clinical/Research/Basic Science: There is always one on one resident/attending mentorship. Residents do rotate at the Westchester office and/or the VA 1-2 times a week while on service with some attendings. ENT, peds, and GU are strong collaborators. There is a small amount of funding and a lot of support for required clinical research by residents. Basic science research is admittedly very weak. Physics and radiobiology twice a week for one year with intensive board review.
    My two cents: It seems that everyone who ended up here was happy. That's saying a lot. Great clinical training and the opportunity for clinical projects.

    Mt. Sinai
    Location: NYC again, but this time Manhattan. With subsidized housing that you must apply for, which is not available to all residents. Upper east side on the park.
    Faculty: There are 5 onsight faculty (two are considered part time, but work almost full time) and one at the VA. Three of the faculty seem fun to work with. Two were more formal but still very nice and we were told that they are amazing clinicians. As far as research, Dr. Stock is well known in prostate. Dr. Rosenstein has made quite a career in radiation biology and is one of the best teachers.
    Residents: Met a few. One of the PGY3s was really great fun. The residents seem happy. They start the day at 7:30-8:00 and work until about 6pm every day. Most interested in private practice. Most live on the upper east side, not all in the housing. All have done small clinical projects.
    Department: Lots of focus on translational research in this department. Physically a small office space upstairs for office visits and the usual basement location for treatment and for resident's room. The department houses a number of IMRT-based LinAcs.
    Clinical/Research/Basic Science: Clinical load is smaller. Teaching is awesome. Dr. Rosenstein teaches radiobio to almost all New York program residents. Residents attend physics class at MSKCC. Residents pretty much kill the boards. Residents do medical oncology, pathology, and radiology rotations in PGY3&4 years. Peds at MSKCC. Most residents have small clinical projects going on and usually present at Astro. The ability is there to go to other conferences but I think this is less common and the work has to be substantial. There is also tons of availability in the lab with Dr. Rosenstein's translational research. Clinical training is one on one with attendings. ACGME requirements are met, but there not a ton more than 450 patients. However, faculty and residents see this as a plus for better teaching.
    My two cents: Great place for really getting to understand and know clinicals. Great place for teaching. Great place for research opportunities. Beautiful hospital. The excitement and expense of NYC, and perhaps always being second to MSKCC.

    Thomas Jefferson
    Location: An awesome part of Philly. I think Philly is a great part of town.
    Faculty: This is a pretty large faculty. One of the highlights of this program was Dr. Curran as program director and he has taken a new chair position at Emory. Many of the remaining faculty are world renown. Dr. Curran is interim chair; I could see how he might be a malignant personality although all of the current residents seemed to have great things to say about him. The program directory Dr. Werner-Wasik seemed to have incredible enthusiasm and seemed a real pleasure to work with. Likewise Dr. Anne. Dr. Lin, the newest addition to the faculty was one of my favorite interviews so far and one of the residents even said that he alone was reason to come.
    Residents: 2 a year for a total of 8. The younger residents had only positive things to say, although they did admit that they work hard a fair amount. This is a super bright group of residents. They seem to really enjoy Philly and all of the social events that Jeff hosts for residents.
    Department: This department is very busy. Neurosciences are a huge strength.
    My two cents: I think this department will stay pretty strong.

    Virginia

    Location: Charlottesville seems a quaint place to live…just enough of the south. Awesome weather and good variety of activities. Decent proximity to DC. Mr. Jefferson's campus is a really beautiful place. Housing is expensive but otherwise the cost of living isn't too bad.
    Faculty: There are 6 full time faculty. The program director, Dr. Read, is a great teacher. Dr. Rich, who does GI, is a former chair and nationally known. The chair, Dr. Larner, has his own lab and is quite research focused and a bit quirky. The others seem very dedicated.
    Residents: 2/1/2/1 rotation for a total of 6. Two spots for '09. The younger residents (the two PGY2s and the one PGY3) seem like a lot of fun. They really enjoy the field and seemed to be happy with the program.
    Department: This department seems busy. Supposedly there are blueprints for the new cancer center which is slated to open in 2010 (I think). There is one satellite office where residents spend one day a week. Tomotherapy does keep a lot of patients at UVa. The department has a few retrospective studies going on and there are RTOG protocols open.
    Clinical/Research/Basic Science: Residents really focus on clinicals in their first year, one-on-one with attendings. The residents are really involved in clinic. A lot of small projects and retrospective reviews going on with all the faculty. A fair amount of research-oriented thinking makes this an easy place to pick up small projects.
    My two cents: The younger residents seem happy and you can't really go wrong in Charlottesville.
  35. Impressions

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    Fox Chase Cancer Center:
    Strengths: Pollack is a great chair, though rumors he may be leaving. Exceptionally supportive group. Minimal scut. Will support you to go to ANY conference you are presenting at (hence very productive group). They even support people going to Radium (such as in the Netherlands). Few departments will do that (except for maybe Wisconsin). Residents were exceptionally friendly and dynamic, including one DO/PhD. No pressure to go either private or academic. Strong people in all areas. The one painful faculty member is now in SF. Physics is very strong. They have so many gadgets it's really neat. Kind of like Beaumont but on the East Coast. They have a golf course right next to the hospital. Fox Chase is really renowned in the region, and like MDACC / MSKCC, you are the only residents at the center. Residents are down to earth and fun, including many presentations at ASTRO.

    Weaknesses: Competes with Penn for cases. The building of the Proton center at Penn and all the money dumping into the Cancer center may draw away. Some people really don't like Philadelphia. The other issue is Fox
    Chase is located more in a suburban area rather than in the city center like Jefferson or Penn. Some say the emphasis on prostate is too heavy.

    My two cents: Great program in the area. Vies with Penn for top program in Philadelphia (most would say Penn is "ranked" higher though). Another program that impressed me more than I expected. Also, rumor is that if you are from Penn med, you typically do not get an interview at Fox Chase.

    MSKCC:
    Strengths: Amazing clinical training and volume. Probably can't be beat. Manhattan is a great city but get used to little space. SUBSIDIZED HOUSING! Best program in New York, hands down. Vies with Harvard and MDACC for best program overall. Amazing cancer center. You work hard, but it's not scut heavy. You work hard because of the sheer numbers, and people seemed genuinely happy. Recruits from UCSF, Stanford, and Hopkins make department stronger. Powell as new chair will only make this program even stronger (and more resident friendly) than it already is. PD is exceptionally nice and supportive.

    Weaknesses: Not really a structured amount of time for research (as little as 3 months?). Strangely, the residents were still really productive. You will work hard here (all patients are covered by a resident). You will not be deficient in anything though. Only place I interviewed at where there was no "social event" night before or night of the interview (and no name tags). Struck me as a little strange. Made me curious about whether or not residents have that much free time.

    My two cents: Great training and a program that will only become more resident friendly with Simon Powell as chair. Radbio will get a new injection. If you like big cities, this is the program to be at. Not for those with a weak stomach though.
  36. Bobby Ballswo

    Bobby Ballswo

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    This board is so top heavy.

    I'm getting the idea that all of the boss programs are ... well, ... boss.

    MSKCC has volume and awesome teachers and gosh darnit, it's in Manhattan. MDACC is the best ever cancer center ever but, tragically, in Houston, which is just a big strip mall. Harvard is Harvard and those MGH people really work hard. Penn is really great and getting better with those newfangled protons, and gosh, the people there are so nice and smart. UCSF is Harvard on the west coast, with better weather, but maybe not as good as Stanford. Stanford is Harvard on the west coast and maybe a little better than UCSF and maybe a little bit worse, but they do a good job with lymphoma and less with poor people. But maybe, it's the same, I'm not sure. Florida has the nicest people ever, but it's in a crummy town. Wisconsin is the bestest ever, but it's too darn cold, but those people sure are nice, but Madison is kind of small and they invented Tomo! And if Beaumont wasn't in Detroit ... blah blah blah.

    Will somebody please have an opinion about Case or Miami or Einstein or Allegheny or Galveston or Emory or Arizona or Davis or Irvine or Henry Ford or Syracuse or Buffalo or Ohio State or Drexel or Tufts?

    I just think it's funny that, in the majority, people only review the top programs. These are places most of us won't go to. Think about the doofus who has to interview at Kentucky or Wayne State or Pittsburgh or Kaiser. Let's get these same in-depth reviews that you get 400 times about MDACC .. at Baylor. That doofus would be so happy to hear about those programs.

    Just a thought ...
    S
    (p.s., the person who put up the impressions about lesser talked about programs - you rule!)
  37. stephew

    stephew SDN Super Moderator Moderator Emeritus

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    a good point- this board is very top heavy and often intimidates candidates who among us mere mortals. Any folks who can post impressions of the lesser spoken about programs would be much appreciated.
  38. SimulD

    SimulD Senior Member

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    oops. absolutely posted from my friend's account. bobby=me.
    s
  39. Impressions

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    Location: The hospital is in a nice part of Cleveland, about 15-20 min outside of the actual downtown area. It is within walking distance to the Cleveland Clinic. There is a nice little campus area with a river, etc. On our interview night, we went out to a restaurant/bowling alley downtown. Unfortunately, there was a ridiculous amount of construction/road closures which made getting a positive impression of the city difficult. Overall, Cleveland is a struggling midwestern city, much like Detroit, with some nice suburbs (Shaker Heights, etc).
    Faculty: There was no chair at the time of our visit and the PD position was being filled on an interim basis by Dr. Lyons. The fact that the program was without a chair was not directly commented on, which I found to be a little disheartening and somewhat disingenuous. The faculty that we did interview with were very friendly. Dr. Lyons recently instituted a resident clinic where the residents, starting at PGY2, see, work up, and treat their own patients with a level of autonomy relative to their experience. This seemed like it was sorely needed at this program because, prior to this, the residents never even had to dictate! Dr. Einstein, as his name suggests, is very intelligent and seems to be a bright spot at this program, faculty-wise.
    Residents: All of them seemed nice enough. There was only 1 position available this year, though I believe the total size of the program to be 5-6.
    Department: Standard equipment, its a rad onc department much like many others.
    Clinic/Research/Didactics: Very little research going on in terms of basic science. One got the impression that, with the changes in faculty, there was very little emphasis on research at the time, clinical or otherwise. There are currently some shared didactics with the residents at the Cleveland Clinic, which most everyone felt was a positive.
    My two cents: This is a program "in transition". As with all programs in this state, there are more question marks then answers. It seems to have a solid base in the University Hospital and some dedicated faculty, which leads one to hope that they will right the ship.
  40. Impressions

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    Location: What can I say about Detroit? It is probably one of the worst, if not THE worst, big city in the US. There are some areas of Detroit that seem nice, with a number of new casinos and clubs/restaurants, but those areas are separated from each other by sprawling pockets of Hell on earth. It is a great sports town with a successful franchise in every major professional sport (excluding the Lions). There are a number of surprisingly nice and affluent suburbs north of Detroit. Most residents live in Royal Oak, which is right near Beaumont and about a 20-30 minute drive from the Detroit Medical Center.
    Faculty: Dr. Turrisi is no longer the chair and the position is now filled on an interim-basis by Dr. Vlahaki, who also serves as the PD. It was made clear to us on our interview day that a thorough search is being conducted and there seemed to be a strong possibility that there would be a new permanent chair. A number of prominent faculty have left, most recently Dr. Forman (GU), and with Dr. Turrisi likely out the door (we didn't even get to interview with him) there will be some serious holes to fill in this program. On the plus side, Dr.'s Patel and Hart both seemed very friendly, upbeat and enthusiastic about resident training. Dr. Vlahaki made very clear that she had a plan for the rebuilding of Wayne's program, but that should obviously be taken with a grain of salt given the tenuousness of her position.
    Residents: 8 total, interviewing for 3 this year. Most of the residents were nice, some were a little weird, and one in particularly seemed very down on the program. If I had to do a little prognostication, I would say that this program has about an 80-90% of needed to scramble to fill one or more spots this year, as they interviewed less than 20 people for 3 spots :eek:.
    Department: They have a tomotherapy unit, a gamma knife, IMRT and a couple of older linacs. They used to have neutrons but unfortunately no longer have them.
    Clinic/Research/Didactics: The physics director, Dr. Burmeister, seemed to be very enthusiastic about research. There appears to be numerous opportunities for physics research, although he did state that residents have to compete with the physics students for projects. The radiobiology program has been somewhat dismantled with a couple of the previous group defecting over to Beaumont. Dr. Joiner seems like a good teacher, although the research opportunities in radbio are slim to none.
    My two cents: Another program "in transition". This program has a good history (chemoradiation, for instance) but unfortunately has lost a number of faculty who had a very positive influence on education. It all depends on who/if they bring in a new chair and what that person does to help fix the problems. It seems like recruiting faculty to Detroit is a daunting task to say the least, so this program may have a harder time rebuilding than some others. There are some very good faculty still there and the scope of pathology seen at Wayne is likely some of the most diverse, given the patient population.
  41. Impressions

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    Medical University of South Carolina: Solid clinical training in one of the most beautiful cities in the US; I can't say enough about the city of Charleston. The faculty at MUSC all seemed extremely friendly and driven toward resident education. They have pretty much every type of technology you could ask for (not protons) due to some recent department upgrades. They were previously known as a "clinical only" type of residency but they appear to be making some progress toward developing some active research. Specifically, they recently hired Dr. Sharma, who is big into research and made it clear during the interview. The only knock on this program, other than lack of basic science research, is that is all very "southern". This can be a good thing or a bad thing, depending on how you look at it, but it does seem that residents coming out of that program would have better luck finding employment in the south and southeast as opposed to the rest of the nation. Otherwise, a great clinical education with nice faculty, nice residents, nice weather and a nice hospital. Very nice!

    University of Louisville This program is a bit of a disaster at the moment. Not much care was taken to hide that fact from the interviewees, which I guess was refreshing in terms of honesty. They recently had some residents leave due to unhappiness and the current PD, who is now retiring, made no bones about the fact that the faculty openly disliked a few of their residents. Oddly enough, she seemed genuinely friendly, so maybe it was just a bad crop of residents. The rest of the faculty were friendly, if somewhat disinterested in the interview process. The physics guy looks like Colonel Sanders and asks some ridiculous questions right off of a sheet that he clearly googled from some interviewing technique website. Questions like "Name three books that have changed your life" and "What is your biggest mistake?" really facilitated the getting-to-know-you process. The residents openly stated that they were overworked but that they believed that things were getting better. Didactics seem to be a bit of a problem there, in that they are infrequent and not well attended. Overall, a program that is having some troubles and may be on an upswing, but right now is less than ideal.

    University of Cincinnati Another solid clinical training program, as has been noted previously on this board. Faculty were very down to earth and seemed committed to teaching. Residents gushed about how happy they were and how great their education was. This is, obviously, never a bad thing. They have most every type of technology/disease site that you could want, with enough peds volume to easily fulfill requirements. They also specialize in intraocular brachytherapy, for those who have a burning desire to irradiate eyeballs. Didn't see much of the city, so I can't comment on Cincinnati. Most of the residents and faculty lived in suburbs to the north and east of the hospital which is, itself, north of the actual city.

    Medical College of Wisconsin Much like Cincinnati, this is a solid clinical program with the benefit of some additional research opportunities. Dr. Lawton (PD) is a big name in GU/prostate. She seems to be very protective of the residents in a strange sort of matronly way, but it the residents appreciate it. Everyone is very friendly but also very homogenous, to the point that I am having difficulty remembering anyone in particular. One thing that I DO remember, however, was the bizarre behavior of the program coordinator who sat in the conference room with the applicants who weren't interviewing at the time and fired personal and pointed questions at them. She concluded this odd pimping/harassment session by informing us that we had best send HER a thank you card if we want to be ranked. Other than that, the program seemed great. Didn't see much of Milwaukee, but it sounds like it is incredibly cold in the winter and very pretty during the warmer months, with tons of outdoor sports/activites. The hospital itself is outside of the city and most residents live in the area immediately surrounding the hospital.
  42. Impressions

    Impressions Removed

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    Location: I do not remember hearing anyone rave about the city of Pittsburgh on my interview day, but journalists do rank Pittsburgh quite highly in terms of overall livability. On the other hand, the American Lung Assoc ranked Pitt #2 (behind LA) in terms of air pollution.

    Faculty: Because Pitt is a younger residency program, the faculty had been previously working without residents for some time. To my surprise, however, the faculty with whom I interviewed were exceptionally personable and welcoming. I got the sense that if I were to match at Pitt, I would really enjoy working with these attendings. Now, regarding Dr. Greenberger...he was initially intense with his questions, but it became apparent that he was trying to teach me something about the current state of radonc. I really enjoyed that conversation, believe it or not.

    Residents: Had lunch with this friendly, diverse group. Some single, some married, all good-looking. Great sense of humor. Guy with the dark Jheri curls (?) was absolutely hilarious and set a positive, upbeat tone for the lunch.

    Facilities: Definitely not lacking in tech (see oncodancer's review below). Huge UPMC network.

    Interviews: I actually did not mind the 30-45 min waits between the brief 15-20 min interviews. The # of interviewees outnumbered the # of faculty interviewing, so I believe the faculty were interviewing us nonstop. During the breaks, I was able to fully reflect on each interview and also chat at length with fellow applicants. That said, it might also work to divide interviewees into AM/PM groups like Beaumont does.

    Other: Definitely could benefit from putting up a professionally designed website, and sending interviewees home with info folder (program booklet/glossies, UMPC promos, living in Pittsburgh, reprints of resident posters/abstracts, etc).

  43. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Would second this impression. Uncomfortable in that she asked questions like "Are you single or married?" and "Why aren't you married?" and "Do you have a specific anatomical site you want to treat?", and then wanted answers in front of all the rest of the applicants. Not cool. Really had to bite my wise-*** tongue in my replies, wanted to "politely" tell her to mind her own business. But in fairness it should be emphasized she was the program coordinator, not the program director, which would be far more concerning.
  44. stephew

    stephew SDN Super Moderator Moderator Emeritus

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    so by "program coordinator" was this person not an MD?
  45. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    program "coordinator" = administrative assistant, or what we used to call a secretary. usually assistant to the chair or the PD.
  46. stephew

    stephew SDN Super Moderator Moderator Emeritus

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    actually, coordinator is appropriate. They also are generally secretaries. Anyway if it coordinator was being making inappropriate comments/questions, i wouldnt worry as much as if it were the PD or a doc. Having said that, its good for that info to get back to the PD.
  47. Cancerdancer

    Cancerdancer

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    Agreed. Didn't mean to sound condescending, was surprised you didn't seem to know what the program coordinator was--now from your response it seems like you already did!:)
  48. SimulD

    SimulD Senior Member

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    Jheri curls? Ha. Well, for better or worse, my locks are shorn.
    S
  49. go hokies

    go hokies

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    any more reviews of the MUSC program out there?
  50. stephew

    stephew SDN Super Moderator Moderator Emeritus

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    no no problem. When I first read the post about the questions I read over "coordinator" and thought you meant PD. that's why i asked for clarification.

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