Menu Icon Search
Close Search

About the ads

  1. If you prefer the SDN Blue style, go to the bottom left of the page and select "SDN Blue"

It's OFFICIAL....Most Competitive Specialties by Step 1 and Step 2 Scores...

Discussion in 'General Residency Issues' started by p53, 08.15.07.

  1. p53

    p53 ****** for F******

    Joined:
    01.13.05
    Messages:
    556
    SDN 5+ Year Member

    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    This will finally shut up the people that claim General Surgery, Anesthesiology, and Ob/Gyn are competitive.....LOL.....

    Step 1 averages of those that matched (based on March 15, 2007 Match)

    1. Plastic Surgery, Step 1= 243 Step 2= 246
    2. Dermatology, Step 1= 240 Step 2= 240
    3. ENT, Step 1= 239 Step 2=240
    4. Diagnostic Radiology, Step 1 = 235 Step 2= 238
    5. Radiation Oncology, Step 1 = 235 Step 2=237
    6. Orthopedic Surgery, Step 1 = 234 Step 2= 236
    7. Transitional Year, Step 1 = 233 Step 2=231
    8. Internal Medicine, Step 1=222 Step 2=228
    8. General Surgery, Step 1=222 Step 2=228
    8. Pathology, Step 1=222 Step 2=226
    11. Medicine-Pediatrics Combined, Step 1=221 Step 2=233
    11. Emergency Medicine, Step 1=221 Step 2=228
    13. Anesthesiology, Step 1=220 Step 2=224
    14. Neurology, Step 1=218 Step 2=226
    15. Pediatrics, Step 1=217 Step 2=226
    16. Ob/Gyn, Step 1=213 Step 2= 224
    17. Family Medicine, Step 1=209 Step 2=219
    18. PM&R, Step 1=208 Step 2=214
    19. Psychiatry, Step 1=208, Step 2=213

    As I mentioned many, many times. ENT and Diagnostic Radiology is more competitive than Orthopedic Surgery.

    Also, the competition for the cush transitional year is getting increasing competitive. Step 1 average for the Transitional year is 10+ points higher than General Surgery, Anesthesiology, and ER.

    What does the new AAMC data suggest?

    1. Applicants want lifestyle. The four most competitive specialties are Plastic Surgery, Derm, ENT, and Radiology. They are outpatient based with minimal overnight emergencies.

    2. Applicants want $$$$. Radiologists start out at $420,000+ a year after residency. Surgeons start out at $250,000. Why would you want $170,000 less AND be on overnight call after residency?
  2. BlackSails

    BlackSails

    Joined:
    04.04.07
    Messages:
    868
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Why would you want to spend $200,000 and 4 years of your life, followed by hellish residency? Go into finance.
  3. mgdsh

    mgdsh

    Joined:
    03.15.07
    Messages:
    410
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 7+ Year Member

    1) how do you explain EM, Anesthesia, PM&R and Psych then?
  4. NEMC

    NEMC Junior Member

    Joined:
    08.17.06
    Messages:
    99
    SDN 7+ Year Member
  5. Long Dong

    Long Dong My middle name is Duc.

    Joined:
    08.08.04
    Messages:
    1,897
    Location:
    The Best Coast
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    What makes you say that?:confused:
  6. SurgeryRA

    SurgeryRA Senior Member

    Joined:
    01.25.04
    Messages:
    107
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    The Step scores for Rad Onc may not be as high as plastics, derm, or ENT but 21% of successfully matched applicants have a Ph.D. I don't know if there is a specialty that even comes close to that number.
  7. snoopy brown

    snoopy brown Removed

    Joined:
    07.16.07
    Messages:
    314
    Does it give you an erection to tell people that ENTs have higher Step I scores than Orthopods or something? Because you note that you have said it "many, many times" and I'm pretty sure not too many people really care. Also, the only thing it really indicates is that it is more difficult to match into subspecialties, largely because there are way more GP spots. Comparing "competitiveness" of FP to Plastics is a joke given the class sizes of both. Also, I don't know if you realized this, Einstein, but making a statement about ENT versus Ortho or any other speciality based on a five-point difference in average scores is something only a real idiot would even attempt. Good job analyzing data, champion.
  8. DrDude

    DrDude Removed

    Joined:
    03.10.07
    Messages:
    106
    Can somebody explain this one?!
  9. SurgeryRA

    SurgeryRA Senior Member

    Joined:
    01.25.04
    Messages:
    107
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    The transitional year has inflated scores because people going Derm, radiology, rad onc want a less strenuous intern year than doing a prelim medicine/surgery year.
  10. GYN DOC

    GYN DOC

    Joined:
    02.16.07
    Messages:
    126
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Competitiveness of a residency is not just based on average board scores. You have to also take into consideration the amount of programs available versus the amount of applicants applying. For instance in OB, the average board scores are not the highest however there were a lot more applicants applying than positions available making 2007 the most competitive match for OB ever. There were only a few spots left in the scramble as opposed to previous years. Can you imagine >100 students scrambling for 5 or 6 spots when there are usually 20-25 spots.
  11. BlackSails

    BlackSails

    Joined:
    04.04.07
    Messages:
    868
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Are most of those physics PhDs?
  12. SurgeryRA

    SurgeryRA Senior Member

    Joined:
    01.25.04
    Messages:
    107
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    True. Except that if you look at plastics, derm, ENT, rad onc there are more people applying than there are spots. In plastics 51/136 U.S. seniors didn't match. In derm ~150/400 U.S. seniors didn't match. This coupled with the high board scores is what makes these specialties so competitive to get into.
  13. Pinkertinkle

    Pinkertinkle 2003 Member

    Joined:
    10.16.03
    Messages:
    4,920
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Can you link us to some data that shows this? residency.wustl.edu shows 90% match rate which is similar or higher than most specialties.
  14. Gfunk6

    Gfunk6 Troublemaker Moderator Lifetime Donor

    Joined:
    04.15.04
    Messages:
    2,943
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Physician PhD Faculty SDN 10+ Year Member
    No. In fact, virtually no Physics PhDs. Most are in areas of Biomedical Science (e.g. Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Immunology, Pharmacology, etc.).
  15. Long Dong

    Long Dong My middle name is Duc.

    Joined:
    08.08.04
    Messages:
    1,897
    Location:
    The Best Coast
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Okay rad onc has more PhDs, but I say derm has the hottest female residents out of all specialties.:D
  16. EctopicFetus

    EctopicFetus Keeping it funky enough

    Joined:
    05.03.04
    Messages:
    10,028
    Location:
    Arizona
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Can we get a link.
  17. Reaganite

    Reaganite Member

    Joined:
    04.06.06
    Messages:
    280
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Regarding competitiveness, I think RadOnc, Derm, and plastics are the most competitive specialties without question. Radiology, while also competitive, just isn't in the same tier as these 3. It may have the same board score average as RadOnc, for example, but you can't just look at board scores when you are comparing the competitiveness of specialties, especially RadOnc. It has been suggested that the Step1 average for RadOnc may be diluted by all of the PhDers. This is certainly not a knock against people with combined degrees, but the informal consensus on our board seems to be that the average board score of those with combined degrees is significantly lower than the MD-only average scores. These people still match, however, because extensive research experience/publications are highly valued in the field. It is often said that to match in RadOnc, you either need a PhD or an absolutely outstanding academic record.
  18. Reaganite

    Reaganite Member

    Joined:
    04.06.06
    Messages:
    280
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Damn straight!
  19. Long Dong

    Long Dong My middle name is Duc.

    Joined:
    08.08.04
    Messages:
    1,897
    Location:
    The Best Coast
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 7+ Year Member
  20. yaah

    yaah Boring Administrator

    Joined:
    08.15.03
    Messages:
    27,556
    Location:
    Fixing in 10% neutral buffered formalin
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Physician SDN 10+ Year Member
    Why does it always matter to people whether a specialty is "more competitive" than another? And a board score difference of 5-10 points averaged over the hundreds of people who take it and go into certain fields is supposed to matter? An application is not just a board score, you can't make up for deficiencies in other areas by having a high board score.

    In my field, for example (path), if you were to take the most popular or biggest 20 programs in the country and average the board scores for those only, the numbers would come out higher than whatever the average is above. But within that group there will still be people with lower scores who match, and people with higher scores who are ranked lower.

    That is not to say a board score won't help your application, because if it's good it will, but to make some kind of farcical claim that board score and competitiveness are equivalent is nonsense.
  21. ForbiddenComma

    ForbiddenComma Tanned for Bowling

    Joined:
    10.16.04
    Messages:
    930
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Waiiit... EM actually has lower scores than IM? :O

    It's a shame that some of the most competitive fields also are arguably involve the least amount of real "doctoring." For instance, ask an EMS what is the least useful physician to have on the scene of an MVA and the answer will invariably come back "dermatologist." Sure, they will rake in obscene amounts of money, no arguments there... but on the other hand, Seinfeld's old zing of "Pimple Popper M.D." has some merit doesn't it? ;) (and before you say it... you don't need a derm to excise a melanoma... any oncologist, surgeon or even family doc can do it too, it's not rocket science)

    And I don't care how cool the Christian/Troy firm looks. Saving the world one boob job at a time doesn't actually work.

    It's too bad our best and brightest wind up in such fields instead of where they'd really be useful -- in surgery and primary care. It's a shame our screwed up healthcare system rewards fields based mainly on how well they are able to free themselves from the tangles of Medicare and insurance.
  22. yaah

    yaah Boring Administrator

    Joined:
    08.15.03
    Messages:
    27,556
    Location:
    Fixing in 10% neutral buffered formalin
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Physician SDN 10+ Year Member
    Well, that's pretty biased. How useful is a dermatologist in an MVA? Who cares? How useful is a trauma surgeon in a patient with a rash, and earache, and a fever? And you can argue forever about whether one field or another involves more "doctoring" but your argument will end up coming back to what your definitions and biases are. All EM physicians will be well advised to remember that not all medicine passes through the ER, just as all radiologists would be advised that not all medicine needs a radiologic study, and all surgeons would be advised that not everything is treated surgically.

    These arguments about competitiveness always end up coming down to "which field is better" in which the people in lifestyle fields bash those who aren't by saying they weren't competitive enough and the people not in lifestyle fields bash those in them for various reasons. It's tired and silly.

    In terms of your last point, I agree with that. Medicare rewards "procedures" and specialization. It's silly but that's the way things get compartmentalized.
  23. What the pho

    What the pho Good to the last drop

    Joined:
    02.25.03
    Messages:
    179
    Location:
    little saigon
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    So what is a ED doc going to do at a MVA? Call the truama surgeons? Do you know why ER docs are called wich doctors? Because whenever a patient comes in, the ED docs are asking themselves which doctors are they going to consult.;)
    You know what they say, glorified triage nurse.

    That maybe so, but it is common knowledge that the PhDs usually have the lower board scores and less of them are aoa. If you look at derm ~47% are AOA, no specialty can say that. Also in derm 3 people with 260s didn't match and 11 with 250s didn't match "I don't know if there is a specialty that even comes close to that number." Those with 260+ match in almost any field they want except derm.
  24. SurgeryRA

    SurgeryRA Senior Member

    Joined:
    01.25.04
    Messages:
    107
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    [/QUOTE]Okay that maybe so, but it is common knowledge that the PhDs usually have the lower board scores and less of them are aoa. If you look at derm ~47% are AOA, no specialty can say that. Also in derm 3 people with 260+ didn't match and 11 with 250+ didn't match "I don't know if there is a specialty that even comes close to that number." Those with 260+ match in almost any field they want except derm.[/QUOTE]

    My point wasn't that Rad Onc was more competitive than derm, ent, or plastics. I just wanted to point out that they rewarded research more than other specialties. Not just summer research projects, but significant research that resulted in a doctorate that it minimum took 3 years to accomplish. It is impressive that 47% of the residents that matched derm were AOA. Whether a Ph.D or AOA is more impressive is up to the residency programs themselves. Who knows...maybe some more of the M.D./Ph.Ds would have scored 250+ if they took more time to study for boards.
  25. chicamedica

    chicamedica 1K Member

    Joined:
    07.31.03
    Messages:
    1,782
    Location:
    USA
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    but can you be sure that some derm candidate with a lower board score + special connection didn't beat out some of those derm candidates with 250s-260s? unfortunately this is how the world of medicine works sometimes. And there is MUCH more to a competitiveness of a field than board scores. I think the derm stats just show the extent of unpredictability of admissions (and that, to that field, there is more to their candidates of preference than just their scores).

    as for AOA, well, we all know how subjective med school grading can be. . .
  26. LADoc00

    LADoc00 híppos khlōrós

    Joined:
    09.09.04
    Messages:
    5,799
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Why would this list be suprising for ANYONE?

    What idiot would claim that Ortho is a more competitive match than Rads or Derm?

    The important X-factor is where is Eye Surgery??

    Someone get on that.

    My thoughts: AOA, board scores and even PhD utterly PALE in comparison to where a person is from and who they know. Dont tell me an AOA from Virginia State is on a stronger footing than a non-AOA HMS alum....
  27. p53

    p53 ****** for F******

    Joined:
    01.13.05
    Messages:
    556
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Why can't most medical students understand statistics? Take a look at the sample size of the number of students that matched into ortho vs ent THEN get back to us.
  28. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Administrator SDN Senior Moderator Lifetime Donor

    Joined:
    04.09.00
    Messages:
    32,200
    Location:
    Arizona
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Physician Faculty hSDN Member SDN 10+ Year Member
    Shall we invite the pre-meds over here so they can get into the fray about whats more competitive than the others?

    They seem to like those sort of arguments over there. I thought we were a little smarter or at least a little more blase about that stuff over here.:rolleyes:
  29. p53

    p53 ****** for F******

    Joined:
    01.13.05
    Messages:
    556
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Do you know anything about MD/PhD programs?

    MD/PhD candidates are just like MD students for the 1st two years of medical school. After they take Step 1 then they take 3-4 years to do research. Then they come back to finish up the last 2 years of clinical study.

    NOW HOW CAN MD/PHD STUDENTS HAVE LESS TIME TO STUDY FOR STEP 1?

    If you are ignorant please keep it to yourself.

  30. funkless

    funkless Apatheist, Anestheologist

    Joined:
    07.07.03
    Messages:
    2,783
    Location:
    Where'd Your Pleasure Go?
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    ...was wondering the same thing. Could it have something to do with the dearth of ophtho/ocular exposure in many med schools?
  31. plastikosmd

    plastikosmd

    Joined:
    12.20.06
    Messages:
    132
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    to me a field's competitiveness is based on the requirements of the field (boards, grades, letters etc) the number of seats and the number of competitive people (people with similar stats) that you are applying against. board scores just get you to the door...after sitting on 2 residency appointment committees, i dont remember mentioning a candidate's scores once at the meeting. ( "...well they were so blas&#233; i dont even remember their interview but wow a 272....") you want to get in? do your best with your scores/grades etc and then rotate and impress the heck out of them. guess who is gonna get ranked higher..... someone with an insane score that we knew nothing about (didnt know letter writers, no calls from colleagues etc.) or someone<240 that rotated and blew us away. (Plastic)
  32. Gfunk6

    Gfunk6 Troublemaker Moderator Lifetime Donor

    Joined:
    04.15.04
    Messages:
    2,943
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Physician PhD Faculty SDN 10+ Year Member
    Not always true. Some MSTPs have integrated medical-graduate school curriculums for the 1st two years. When I was an MS-1 ~10 yrs ago we dumped Medical Biochem/Histology entirely. We replaced this w/ graduate equivalents which did not exactly emphasize clinical medicine.

    However, I have no idea how many MD-PhDers undergo an integrated curriculum nowadays, so your statement may still be valid.
  33. Blue Dog

    Blue Dog Avec caféine. Gold Donor SDN Advisor

    Joined:
    01.21.06
    Messages:
    9,220
    Location:
    South of disorder.
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Physician SDN 7+ Year Member
    Perhaps because radiology bores the hell out of you? ;)
  34. LADoc00

    LADoc00 híppos khlōrós

    Joined:
    09.09.04
    Messages:
    5,799
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    I agree, BUT you have a CORE fundamental shift being witnessed in the very profession. The climb of lifestyle fields in terms of competitiveness and a potential brain drain from lesser lifestyle friendly fields like OB is bound to have catastrophic effects on all healthcare providers.

    THINK GLOBAL WARMING FOR MEDICINE: INSTEAD OF CARBON EMISSIONS WE HAVE AN UNNATURAL ACCUMULATION OF RADIOLOGISTS AND DERMIES....
    AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH?
  35. tawanda

    tawanda

    Joined:
    07.18.07
    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    Ohio
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Our patients don't care about our board scores and they are the only ones who matter.
  36. p53

    p53 ****** for F******

    Joined:
    01.13.05
    Messages:
    556
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Boring?

    Radiology is the most cerebral subspecialty in medicine. Most subspecialties rely heavily on preset protocols or algorithym.

    In medicine, intellectual fulfillment resides in diagnosing diseases. No other specialty gives you as many opportunities to diagnose diseases than in radiology. As a radiologist you will see the most interesting cases in the hospital.
  37. Blue Dog

    Blue Dog Avec caféine. Gold Donor SDN Advisor

    Joined:
    01.21.06
    Messages:
    9,220
    Location:
    South of disorder.
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Physician SDN 7+ Year Member
    Speak for yourself. Some of us actually like treating patients. ;)

    FYI, imaging studies usually confirm what we already know from a thorough history and physical exam. Anyone who's making their diagnoses from imaging studies isn't trying very hard.

    Besides, most diseases aren't diagnosed with imaging.
  38. p53

    p53 ****** for F******

    Joined:
    01.13.05
    Messages:
    556
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    I agree there is strong personal fulfillment in working with patients.

    HOWEVER, I said INTELLECTUAL fulfillment. Talking to patients is fun but it is NOT intellectually stimulating.

    Besides, not all radiology subspecialties have no patient contact.
  39. snoopy brown

    snoopy brown Removed

    Joined:
    07.16.07
    Messages:
    314
    Oh so all of a sudden there are other factors to competitiveness besides a five-point difference in Step I/II scores? You're lecturing me on sample size when I pointed out sample size to you? Let me guess, you must not be too bright because you made a post to finally prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that Radiology and ENT was where it was at and you failed miserably. If you're in either of those specialties, all you did was prove that you can be not very good analytically and still get in, which does provide hope for many, at least.
  40. Long Dong

    Long Dong My middle name is Duc.

    Joined:
    08.08.04
    Messages:
    1,897
    Location:
    The Best Coast
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Ask and you shall recieve.

    Optho last year had an average of 231 and Nuero Surge had an average of 236.

    It's because optho and NS are sfmatch (early match) and you have to go there for the match stats. This charting match outcomes report is for NRMP (regular match).
  41. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Administrator SDN Senior Moderator Lifetime Donor

    Joined:
    04.09.00
    Messages:
    32,200
    Location:
    Arizona
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Physician Faculty hSDN Member SDN 10+ Year Member
    I dunno...I find talking to patients, examining them and diagnosing them very intellectually and psychologically rewarding. But then I'm easily entertained.

    It has been the rare event that I have been suprised at a radiological finding because the diagnosis has already been made clinically. Unfortunately, I cannot say the same for the reverse...I have seen several discordant radiological "findings" which were not found clinically or in the operating room.
  42. Blue Dog

    Blue Dog Avec caféine. Gold Donor SDN Advisor

    Joined:
    01.21.06
    Messages:
    9,220
    Location:
    South of disorder.
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Physician SDN 7+ Year Member
    Hence the term "VOMIT"...Victim Of Modern Imaging Technology. ;)
  43. p53

    p53 ****** for F******

    Joined:
    01.13.05
    Messages:
    556
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    I commend you for being the only surgeon in america that is a DIAGNOSTICIAN.

    Majority of the Clinical Diagnosis is deciphered by internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, and ob/gyn. Once the clinical diagnosticians find a clinical condition they set the table up for the surgeons by "consulting" them.

    For what it is worth, surgeons are widely considered "doers" not "thinkers".

    "A chance to cut is a chance to cure"
  44. p53

    p53 ****** for F******

    Joined:
    01.13.05
    Messages:
    556
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    I would love to find physicians that are able to diagnose PE, DVT, Aortic Dissection, Hemmoragic stroke of the brain "clinically".

    I heard the Homan's Sign, and asymmetric pulses are very reliable for diagnosis. Also, since ischemic strokes are so easy to distinguish from hemmoragic strokes clinically, is it really cost effective to get a CT?

    Why stop there? Let's use jaundice, fever, ruq pain to diagnose cholangitis.
    Why get an Ultrasound?

    While we are at it. Let's diagnose osteomyelitis clinically by tapping the bone.

    Lastly, I'm sure Hammond's crunch is very effective at diagnosing booerhave's syndrome. What's the point of getting a X-ray to look for pneumomediastinum or air under the diaphragm.
  45. Blue Dog

    Blue Dog Avec caféine. Gold Donor SDN Advisor

    Joined:
    01.21.06
    Messages:
    9,220
    Location:
    South of disorder.
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Physician SDN 7+ Year Member
    Are you serious? Every one of those is commonly diagnosed clinically. That doesn't mean you don't order imaging (not in this day and age), but you pretty much know what the imaging is going to show when you order the test. None of these should be surprises if you know what you're doing. You don't have to be a genius at bedside diagnosis to figure that stuff out.

    I'm going to have to assume you're pre-med based on that one. Wait until you've spent some time working in clinical medicine and you'll see how it works.
  46. ForbiddenComma

    ForbiddenComma Tanned for Bowling

    Joined:
    10.16.04
    Messages:
    930
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Oh, and you think you can routinely pick up PE's on CT that are missed clinically? How often do you think Westermark's sign really shows up in real life?

    Yeah, a CT angio may pick it up... but for a clinician to order that, they will already have had a high index of suspicion for PE, no?

    I'm not knocking rads or imaging. What I am saying is, the utility of a given medical field has pretty much zero correlation to its competitiveness or average Step 1 scores.
  47. colbgw02

    colbgw02 Delightfully Tacky

    Joined:
    12.09.04
    Messages:
    3,499
    Location:
    Purgatory
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Westermark's sign and Hampton's hump are signs for conventional chest radiography, not CT.

    Nope. We routinely get into pissing matches with the ER because they want a CTPA to rule out PE on a patient with a negative d-dimer. Check the literature - the NPV for a PE of a negative d-dimer is impressive.
  48. AlternateSome1

    AlternateSome1 Dismembered

    Joined:
    08.02.02
    Messages:
    967
    Location:
    NY
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Physician SDN 10+ Year Member
    WTF is "Virginia State"? :D
  49. I would disagree here - General Surgery is often the one to make the diagnosis with many patients and the ever-present working diagnosis of...

    (1) Abdominal pain
    (2) "Surgical" abdomen
    (3) "Acute abdomen"
    (4) Intra-abdominal process

    I feel like this is one of the few fields where we're routinely consulted for a symptom, not an actual working diagnosis.
  50. ForbiddenComma

    ForbiddenComma Tanned for Bowling

    Joined:
    10.16.04
    Messages:
    930
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Sorry you get clinicians like that, then... all the ones I rotate with are cost-obsessed and are loathe to order so much as an LP on a febrile patient with neck stiffness, photophobia and hx of syncope. (<-- true story)

// Share //

Style: SDN Universal