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Letters of Recommendation

Discussion in 'Neurology' started by TUGM, Aug 14, 2013.

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  1. TUGM

    TUGM

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    I have an issue with LORs that I'd like to run by the more experienced. I rotated in my Neurology elective early, as I've known for a long time I wanted to go into a neuroscience-based specialty. The attendings I worked with, however, both quit shortly after I rotated (not because of me!) due to the high pressure of the job at my institution. Therefore, we have not had neurology coverage for the past 2 years. My mentor is an interventional neurologist at a private hospital associated with our medical school.

    So basically, I am only able to obtain ONE letter from a Neurologist. My other letters include 1-2 letters from IM attendings I worked very closely with in an inpatient and outpatient setting and 1 letter from the director of internal medicine/neurobiology research at a strong midwest university hospital system. I have tried multiple times to contact my previous neurology attendings to no avail...

    Am I going to be discounted during interview selection because I have only 1 neurology letter? All I want to do is be a brain doctor!!:love:
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2013
  2. drzing

    drzing

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    I would try to get a letter from your department chair.
  3. TUGM

    TUGM

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    It's funny because we don't have one... Yeah big shortage of neurologists in our area.
  4. bblue

    bblue Member

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    You have nothing to worry about. One letter from a neurologist is ample. Other letters should come from people who know you the best and will speak highly of you. The research letter will be a big boost and help you stand out as well. Don't fret.
  5. 807crash

    807crash

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    You are fine.

    I actually didn't have a single letter from a Neurologist. Because of the rotations/requirements at my Med school and the early match, I hadn't even completed my Neurology rotation yet when I had already started applying!

    It is more important to have strong letters from people who know you well, and/or strong names/chair in a rotation you did very well in.

    I used letters from internal medicine, OB/GYN and my research advisor. In my interviews at the program I ultimately matched at, they made a point of mentioning I had strong letters and did well in my rotations. That's what mattered.

    Of course, you should be able to answer the question "Why Neurology?" like a pro.
  6. TUGM

    TUGM

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    As always, thank you everyone, for your insightful responses.

    One further question: My research letter will be from a PhD, not an M.D. I'm assuming it shouldn't be too much of a problem? Am I correct in assuming this?
  7. typhoonegator

    typhoonegator Neurointensivist Moderator

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    If it were me, I'd take it more seriously!

  8. 807crash

    807crash

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    My research letter was from a PhD, and I think that is great. In fact, it may suggest a slightly more hard core lab/research experience. I also had a letter from a research experience with an MD/PhD scientist, but he was also hard core and didn't see patients.
  9. typhoonegator

    typhoonegator Neurointensivist Moderator

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    By the way, being truly hard core is having a funded lab and also seeing patients.

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