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Medical Students with ADHD

Discussion in 'Allopathic' started by VIVIeImpara, 02.15.09.

  1. VIVIeImpara

    VIVIeImpara

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    Hello, everyone! I'm doing a study for my research class and I need some help from any of you medical students who have been diagnosed with ADHD.

    What has your experience been like?
    Have you been offered any kind of service at your University (like special testing conditions)?
    Have your professors made any accomodations for you?
    What kinds of adjectives would you use to describe your experiences? (frustration? Accomplishment? etc.)

    Thank you in advance for your help! I may post an online survey later this week if I can get enough responses.
     
  2. BORNagainSTDENT

    BORNagainSTDENT

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    I just wanna see the resuls of this thread.
     
  3. VIVIeImpara

    VIVIeImpara

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    Hopefully I get some good responses! I have to write my paper by the end of March, so it would be really helpful if any of you participate. Thanks again!
     
  4. strv04

    strv04

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    Can we ask if patients make any accommodations for you? also? :D
     
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  5. xx216xx

    xx216xx Member

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    the way i've been able to cope with it is I like pie!
     
  6. VIVIeImpara

    VIVIeImpara

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    Yes, that could also be a good question...assuming that you tell your patients of your diagnosis. I'm surprised no one has come forward yet, lol.
     
  7. seelee

    seelee

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    I haven't responded because I am an MS 0 (Start in Texas A&M). But I can comment on my undergrad experience.

    I knew that I had ADD in high school, though I never took medication for it. I never really felt motivated in HS, and I never really tried to do well. I worked for several years after HS and eventually began taking medication because I realized that if I wanted to be successful, I had to do something different. That is when I started taking Strattera which is a non-stimulant and works very well for me.

    When I started college, I was surprised at how easily the material came to me. I graduated from my local CC with a 4.0 and transfered to BYU. I have maintained a 3.9 at BYU (majoring in chemistry).

    Both schools offered acommodations to students with ADD, though I never felt that they were necessary. With my medication I was able to perform well enough without it. Personally I would not feel good about asking for accomodations. I can't speak for other people obviously, but I know that I really don't need them, and to take advantage of them just because would be unethical IMHO.

    My overall experience has been one of triumph and success. I have been able to overcome my challenges and succeed in spite of them. I have been able to adapt and adjust to new challenges as well. While there has been stress and frustration, I do not feel that my ADD has hindered me in the least (as long as I take my meds).

    An interesting idea. Because as a child with ADD I had a very active and vivid imagination, I wonder if that helped my ability to understand the abstract concepts in math/physics/chemistry. When taking calculus I was able to visualize the math very well, and when I took o chem, I could picture a molecule in my head and rotate it around and imagine it from different perspectives. I am curious to know if my ADD helped me to develop this skill.

    I would be interested to hear from people in medical school who have had similar situations.
     
  8. fahimaz7

    fahimaz7

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    This is the most scientifically sound "research" that I've seen in a long time... Why not just say you have ADHD and you were wondering how people in medical school were handling their inability to focus?
     
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  9. Solandri

    Solandri Boognish Provides

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    I have ADD.
    Just like everybody else.
    (Yes, I'm diagnosed)

    About the same as it was in undergrad minus the free time. Plus I now ACTUALLY have to study. And then study some more.
    Hmm, maybe it's nothing like undergrad after all. Oh well, I'm looking forward to clinicals since I'll be on my feet. I detest classroom learning.

    No, but I certainly haven't asked for any either. I don't feel like I (nor anyone else for that matter) deserve any extra time or special accommodations. There's a chance I could get some special treatment if I asked for it but that would simply be unfair.

    See above.

    Overwhelming. But I doubt there's too many students out there, with or without ADD, that think Med School is a cake walk.
     
  10. AggieSean

    AggieSean Coffee is for closers

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    It's been fine so far. I can't really complain because holy crap a butterfly!

    I was diagnosed at an early age after spending a year in a special Kindergarten for kids with learning disabilities and after seeing a child psychiatrist for a year, so I don't think I'm one of those kids that was just medicated because he was annoying.
    I take Ritalin once daily and haven't had any problems. My university hasn't offered me any accommodations because I haven't told them that I have ADD. I would prefer not to take any special measures because I feel like Ritalin levels the playing field. My feelings about everything? Medical school is stressful and frustrating anyway, I don't feel like my ADD adds to that. Though if I wasn't on Ritalin, it would be really hard.
     
  11. I know of 2 individuals that have ADD in my class and as far as I know they have not been given special circumstances. They take their "magic pills" (ritalin or adderall) and bury their noses in the books for hours on end.

    I know there are a lot of non-ADD med students that take these meds for increased performance and I wouldn't be surprised if it was as high 10-20%.:thumbdown: But that has been discussed in other threads.
     
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  12. VIVIeImpara

    VIVIeImpara

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    Thank you all for your responses, this information is great! If there are still more of you out there, it would be extremely helpful if I could get at least a few more...
     
  13. vasca

    vasca En la era postpasambre

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    I probably have ADHD, but neither am I officially diagnosed with it (though a lot of people think I'm very "dispersed and easily distracted") and was never given any special treatment or anything.

    I struggled through med school (I also had a harsh personal life which didn't help) and don't have stellar grades depite being damn smart yet I'm doing very well as an intern where the real stuff matters. People are actually surprised when I tell them how low my school average is because I'm so efficient working.

    I guess that's one nice thing about working in a hospital like the one I work at, even if you had ADHD, you're so tired and full of work you don't have much time to mentally wander in the first place.
     
  14. The Angriest Bird

    The Angriest Bird

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    I don't have ADHD, but if you need anyone with Tourette's, I can surely help :)
     
  15. jackets5

    jackets5 Senior Member

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    ADD, ADHD is the most bogus diagnosis/excuse ever. I cant pay attention in class for more than 15 minutes and dont say or do anything. We have quite a few students who get special considerations because they have ADD and cant concentrate, cry me a river. I could get diagnosed with ADD tommorow as well as anyone that wants to be diagnosed with it. When these people are in clinic, OR etc are they going to tell someone they should get extra time and the patient should stop bleeding so fast because they have ADD. Screw all the politically correct BS.
     
  16. badasshairday

    badasshairday Account on Hold

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    I know a guy who brags about it. :thumbdown:

    It's like steroids in baseball.
     
  17. cajunchrisbu

    cajunchrisbu

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    Haha this thread is fun to read.

    Anyways, I was diagnosed ADD before there was ADHD (back in 1st grade). Its never really been a problem. I am on ritalin ect but never take it because I can study and get along just fine. Perhaps I don't have a serious case of it or perhaps its all B.S. Who knows...

    I haven't used the accommodations provided at my school since I haven't found it necessary.

    This is just my experience
     
  18. seelee

    seelee

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    So because you say it is bogus, we should just take your word for it right?

    Do you plan on using this line on your patients who complain of neuropathy, fibromyalgia, clinical depression, or any one of many diseases that are difficult to diagnose and are poorly understood?

    Not a single person on this thread has advocated taking advantage of "special accomodations". I have even said that I think that unfairly taking advantage of those accomodations is unethical. Get off your high horse.
     
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  19. badasshairday

    badasshairday Account on Hold

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    It isn't bogus, it is just that a lot of people think they have issues when they don't. Then they use the drug to get amazing concentration to study.
     
  20. seelee

    seelee

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    That is not what Jacket5 said. He didn't say that some people take medication who don't need it, but that there is no such thing as ADD. That is like saying that there is no such thing as myopia and that people who wear glasses are just doing to get an extra boost.
     
  21. VIVIeImpara

    VIVIeImpara

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    Thank you for your amazingly close minded opinion. I don't believe I requested it in my initial post, but I know people like you are just in need of a lot of special attention. So, I'll give you your thrill for the day...you got noticed! Congratulations! Is baby happy now?
     
  22. VIVIeImpara

    VIVIeImpara

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  23. jackets5

    jackets5 Senior Member

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    Dont need attention. Im sure some people have issues, but come on the vast majority of ADD is a joke. Anyone can read the right things to say on the internet and get a perscription and a diagnosis for ADD. I feel close to the same way about Drug addicts and alcoholics. No one forced you to use, no one is making you use. If you dont use you will be fine. Its a matter of having enough self-control and discipline to stop yourself. We just to have an excuse for every single wrong people have
     
  24. seelee

    seelee

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    All right everyone...don't feed the troll.
     
  25. badasshairday

    badasshairday Account on Hold

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    Um, the poster is just expressing his opinion. And to be honest, I'm sure others agree with some of what he is saying. The whole issue of ritalin abuse to get an edge is real. People can feel like they have ADHD just because they can't go all out like the kid using ritalin. They want that edge too, and think it is unfair. It is totally like steroids in baseball, if you ain't using it, you feel like your at a disadvantage because the playing field has shifted.
     
  26. seelee

    seelee

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    I am sorry, but there is a huge difference between:

    "There are alot of people who purposefully let themselves be misdiagnosed just so that they can take ADD meds"

    and

    "There is no such thing as ADD, and everyone who thinks they have ADD just lacks self control."

    The first is undoubtedly true. Like any other controlled substance, Ritalin can be abused. Also, I admit that doctors are more likely to mis-prescribe Ritalin that they would Oxycontin. However, that does not mean that ADD is not real. Research has shown that there are distinct pathological differences between brains of people with ADD and people without. And, that those differences are in the frontal cortex and temporal lobe which help control and focus thinking.

    The second however, is Dateline fodder. It is a ridiculous assumption without a shred of proof.

    I know this is anecdotal, but I struggled for years to get by without medication. I barely graduated from HS, I floated around for years, and got fired from several good jobs before I finally decided to get some help. I take strattera (a non-stimulant) regularly, and it has helped me to function like the rest of society.
     
  27. AmoryBlaine

    AmoryBlaine the last tycoon

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    The diagnosis itself is not bogus at all. What is bogus is the way that some people (not necessarily anyone on this thread) want to craft it into a diagnosis of convenience that allows them to get stimulant medication by prescription.

    There is a fairly frequent poster on these forums who will tell you in all apparent seriousness that they got high marks at an ivy league undergrad, got through law school, worked as an attorney, and then suddenly "figured out" they had ADHD when they started med school.

    There are also at least a few people who will tell you that their ADHD conveys upon them special skills as physicians. Not in terms of empathy with patients but in terms of being able to multitask.

    That, is bogus.
     
  28. cajunchrisbu

    cajunchrisbu

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    I like how jackets5 is starting to squirm and give in a bit... now it seems as if there were a few legit cases when there were none before. I would just like to say..."way to go champ, abandoning your convictions at the first sign of resistance is the mark of a class A professional!"

    :rolleyes:
     
  29. fahimaz7

    fahimaz7

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    How many of you with ADD/HD have had a full work up for this diagnosis? I thought that the "child" in question has to be observed, in several settings, by a physician prior to this diagnosis.

    While that may be the truth, I sure as hell know of doctors (especially the student health clinic ones) that will prescribe you ritalin if you tell them you are "having a hard time focusing on school".

    Would this be considered ADD/HD or just reckless medicine..

    lol
     
  30. AggieSean

    AggieSean Coffee is for closers

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    Me. I spent a year in observation at a special kindergarten while being followed by a child psychiatrist and my pediatrician from age four to age six. I was placed on Ritalin in the first grade and my performance in school increased and my conduct marks skyrocketed. So much for being fake.
     
  31. fahimaz7

    fahimaz7

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    I'm not arguing that this is a legit disease. What I am asking is how many people, that are prescribed these drugs, have been through a full evaluation? How many people, in College, have you known that did not have this workup?
     
  32. AggieSean

    AggieSean Coffee is for closers

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    Oh, I wasn't referring to you. I'm sure plenty of people are worked up improperly or not at all. I was referring to a previous poster's assertion that ADD is a bogus dx.
     
  33. seelee

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    You make a strong point, but can we realistically expect doctors to spend hours observing children to make a single diagnosis? Doctors often listen to the patients complaints, then write a perscription, their guess is validated if the symptoms are aliviated. This is the same pattern used with ADD cases. The only difference is that ADD medication might give the ADD students an additional boost over "normal" students. So, what do you suggest, we could:

    1. give no one medication and let the legitimate cases struggle
    2. give everyone medication
    3. continue doing what is being done.

    What do you suggest?
     
  34. jackets5

    jackets5 Senior Member

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    yeah like i have said for the most part it is a bogus diagnosis. Of course some people have legit issues but most do not and it is a joke how is easy it is to get a diagnosis and a prescription.
     
  35. fahimaz7

    fahimaz7

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    Yes. This is what they are supposed to do in order to make the diagnosis.

    "The year 2000 Diagnostic & Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) provides criteria for diagnosing ADHD. The criteria are presented here in modified form in order to make them more accessible to the general public. They are listed here for information purposes and should be used only by trained health care providers to diagnose or treat ADHD.

    DSM-IV Criteria for ADHD
    I. Either A or B:

    Six or more of the following symptoms of inattention have been present for at least 6 months to a point that is disruptive and inappropriate for developmental level:

    Inattention

    1. Often does not give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities.

    2. Often has trouble keeping attention on tasks or play activities.

    3. Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.

    4. Often does not follow instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions).

    5. Often has trouble organizing activities.

    6. Often avoids, dislikes, or doesn't want to do things that take a lot of mental effort for a long period of time (such as schoolwork or homework).

    7. Often loses things needed for tasks and activities (e.g. toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools).

    8. Is often easily distracted.

    9. Is often forgetful in daily activities.

    Six or more of the following symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity have been present for at least 6 months to an extent that is disruptive and inappropriate for developmental level:

    Hyperactivity

    1. Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat.

    2. Often gets up from seat when remaining in seat is expected.

    3. Often runs about or climbs when and where it is not appropriate (adolescents or adults may feel very restless).

    4. Often has trouble playing or enjoying leisure activities quietly.

    5. Is often "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor".

    6. Often talks excessively.

    Impulsivity

    1. Often blurts out answers before questions have been finished.

    2. Often has trouble waiting one's turn.

    3. Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games).

    2. Some symptoms that cause impairment were present before age 7 years.

    3. Some impairment from the symptoms is present in two or more settings (e.g. at school/work and at home).

    4. There must be clear evidence of significant impairment in social, school, or work functioning.

    5. The symptoms do not happen only during the course of a Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Schizophrenia, or other Psychotic Disorder. The symptoms are not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g. Mood Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, Dissociative Disorder, or a Personality Disorder).

    Based on these criteria, three types of ADHD are identified:

    1. ADHD, Combined Type: if both criteria 1A and 1B are met for the past 6 months

    2. ADHD, Predominantly Inattentive Type: if criterion 1A is met but criterion 1B is not met for the past six months

    3. ADHD, Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Type: if Criterion 1B is met but Criterion 1A is not met for the past six months."

    American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Association, 2000.
     
  36. AmoryBlaine

    AmoryBlaine the last tycoon

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    Some will note, perhaps to their surprise, that "gets distracted while studying biochemistry, physics, or immunology for five hours straight" did not make the cut...
     
  37. seelee

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    Ok, I still refer back to my earlier statement, it does say that these symptoms must be present for six month. It does NOT say that a physician must have first hand knowledge of these symptoms. A previous post said that a physician must observe these symptoms, i.e. have first hand knowledge. What other illnesses must physicians have first hand knowledge of. Yes a person can lie in order to get the medication, and the physician must use his best judgment. But, we cannot fault a physician for listening to the patients complaints and making the diagnosis.

    Once again, what do you suggest we do?

    A. give medication to everyone?
    B. give medication to no one?
    C. continue with the current policy?
     
  38. badasshairday

    badasshairday Account on Hold

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    Exactly. Just because I feel the urge to go on SDN 30 minutes into reading Guyton Physiology, instead of being able to read it for 60min straight, doesn't mean I need the juice. However other med students with the same attention span as me decide to use the magic study pill.
     
  39. MasterDebater

    MasterDebater

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    Since this thread is still currently open and fairly recent, I feel as if I just have to comment, even though I am not yet a medical or dental student.

    Recently, I got medication (Adderall XR 10mg) for what I think is ADHD-I. In fact, I have 7 of the 10 symptoms for the 1A Criteria checked off as 'often' or 'very often.' I just cannot seem to focus, whether in class or out of it and have even debated the whole 'why bother even coming to lectures' thing because I am never listening and sometimes even being made fun of because of it. I make very careless mistakes in computational classes which really aren't that difficult, have trouble with working memory, following verbal or written instructions, keeping up with conversations, and even keeping my thoughts organised. I space out pretty much after every other sentence while reading a textbook, and go back to reread it, only to misinterpret it or forget what I just read, and then when I have learned it after rereading the same sentence multiple times, I can't apply it to what I previously learned through excruciating effort and through spending way more time on it than any of my classmates while receiving either barely satisfactory or failing grades. In every class, I sit there silently and am almost always daydreaming or simply not listening, even if it is in my desires to actually learn. It's as if everything goes in through one ear and out the other without my brain ever getting a chance to process it, and it's been like this ever since I can remember -- that is, I've always daydreamed my way through school without learning or picking up on anything until I've got here where my grades actually do matter. And the problem doesn't stop there. I don't only daydream during school, but very often throughout my entire day when I am not doing anything school related; I realise things very slowly for someone with an IQ of 140 at 18. Last year I can even recall going to an amusement park with my family and remember being asked 6 or 7 times by an employee that was seating people on the rollercoasters to move to the front seat. I was completely unresponsive and just sat there until it got to me the 7th time he had to repeat it. Hell, to even write this short paragraph it took me 20 minutes.

    I really hope someone here can relate, because it feels as if I've always been in a constant fog -- my brain always feels congested and sort of gray, like someone that has trouble seeing but doesn't have their glasses. If it's not ADD-I, then what is wrong with me?
     
  40. vtucci

    vtucci EM PGY-1 Moderator Emeritus

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  41. vtucci

    vtucci EM PGY-1 Moderator Emeritus

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  42. MasterDebater

    MasterDebater

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    vtucci,

    Did you experience any of the inattentive symptoms I described? Because I seem to be the classic example -- I'm just not there most of the time.
     
  43. mai mai

    mai mai

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    =) Yes, it does sound like you have ADHD!!! how is the Adderall working for you? Is it helping the symptoms?

    Ohh btw don't worry there is a lot of people that can relate. I have ADHD and have a lot of the same symptoms plus more (sadly to say). However, I have found that medication for me does not work. Hmm... let me rephrase that, medication works it just screws things up. I learned how to deal with it and then I was forced to take meds and I got hooked. When I finally got off of it, it made it ten times harder for me to consentrate or do anything normal for years. It is still pretty bad but I am making progress again.

    Okay... random question... how many car accidents have you gotten into?
     
  44. BORNagainSTDENT

    BORNagainSTDENT

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    I have a lot of the same issues. I am working on them. I take ADD meds, but it can make my day dreaming worse. I really don't know what to do about it. I actually have a doc appointment today. The problem is I am 26, so time is not on my side.
     
  45. mai mai

    mai mai

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    I will agree with you on that one. I remember day dreaming a lot more after I started on ADHD meds! I didn't really think about it until now. I still day dream a lot. What meds are you on BORNagainSTDENT?
     
  46. MasterDebater

    MasterDebater

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    Adderall has just killed the little social life I had. It's made me feel horrible, very groggy after it's worn off, and it seems even made it more difficult to focus without. On it though, I am able to get everything done the way it's supposed to be done, maybe better. I just don't know what to do any more because I hate how it and other ADHD meds make me feel, and since it appears to be affecting me so adversely why even take it? I don't want to be brain dead when I am 25 or so, or have such a greatly reduced reaction time.

    I have been in one accident and was expecting someone with similar if not the exact same or more severe symptons, would ask exactly that question. The amount of accidents I could have been involved in though is really quite phenomenal, but thankfully someone was in the car with me while I was driving to shout 'hey dumbass -- pay attention!!'

    On a bit of a side note, this just doesn't make sense to me. How can I possibly have ADHD? It's said to be practically guaranteed to be genetic, yet neither of my parents, nor any of my seven family members, nor any of my relatives (at least not the ones I know of) seem to have it, or any symptoms of it. In fact, my dad graduated first in his class in an ivy league school-equivalent to Harvard in Europe. And both parents have very significant attention spans. So what the hell is wrong with me? I am always forgetting things I have just learned through such difficulty, and can't follow instructions if my life depended on it while more than one instruction is just murderous to me. I'm starting to wonder if this is ADD-I or a combination of a few things, and also wondering whether I should seriously consider oral surgery IF I become a dentist one day. Don't want to screw my patients up even more because my head is in the clouds. Any suggestions for ADHD/ADD-I friendly professions in the dental/medical field? Because I was thinking I would enjoy Emergency Med and Dermatology just as much, I am simply not aware of any other professions that would keep my interest and attention span while not putting a patient at risk to one of my careless errors.
     
  47. mai mai

    mai mai

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    Psychology Student
    Taking meds does not always mean that it is going to help, it isn't for everyone. If you are able to control your symptoms partially on you own, I would work on improving it without meds.

    As for the cause of ADHD, it is unknown. There are only "possible" causes of ADHD. Genetic wise, it is just four times more likely that if one person in the family has it another does too.

    ADD/ADHD is still a pretty touchy subject. A lot of professionals do not believe in "ADHD," they think that the kids need to learn self discipline. However, now look at your family, what is their veiw of ADHD? Not only that, there may be family members who also have ADD/ADHD it is just not as noticable. A lot of people had to work harder to control it because "we all go through it" they just had to work ten times harder than their peers.

    Find a carrer that you REALLY enjoy. Something that you know that you will work on and push yourself in to complete. Anything that you think will keep your attention. The thing that are actually pay attention to (well most of the time), it is just a matter of working at it and finding loop holes to get around the symptoms. =) I can elabarate if you want later.

    Hope that helps
     
  48. MasterDebater

    MasterDebater

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    My dad did work harder than his peers, and DID spend more time on things than was needed, but that only explains why he graduated first in his class. He does seem to be a little slow realising things at times, but nothing that's too much out of the ordinary. And well, he can work with distractions quite effectively, I on the other hand, obviously can't. My mom is also the same, and so is pretty much everyone in my family. I know my youngest sister daydreams more often than is usual, but she can consistently it seems, pay attention in school despite sucking at math (it just seems she doesn't understand it). By comparison, it wouldn't make the slightest difference to me if I were physically present in a classroom or not. Most of the material I have to learn outside of class, and the only way I can effectively do so, is by taking this horrendous medication which makes me feel even more sluggish after it wears off. It's as if I am slowly losing my sanity, which is probably true since ADD-I is thought to be associated with the DRD4 gene, the same one which is also thought to be associated with Schizophrenia (which my maternal grandfather had) and Parkinson's. Autism is also on the same chromosome, along with plenty of other disorders and incurable illnesses. Some forms of deafness are even there, which brings to mind my dad's side of the family -- his twin brother died short after birth, while the other twin survived only to have heart problems and hearing problems. What's even stranger is some of these other syndromes are also found in many other Ukrainians and it appears to be exclussively just this ethnic group that's impacted. On my mum's side for instance, her mother died of breast cancer which is *surprise* on this chromosome too. After reading about this, it really makes me wonder what it would be like to be normal, to have a normal attention span, to be able to easily focus, to stop daydreaming for once, to actually recall the important aspects of my childhood because it seems like everything was just one big dream and I don't remember any of it waking up now at 18. What saddens me (or rather angers me) is I am not exactly sure what this is (SCT or ADD-I) and whether or not there will be some way of coping with it without medication, whether or not I'll ever be a normal human being, whether or not I'll be able to enjoy my life as much as everyone else. Thinking about this made me remember those I thought to be really misfortunate, those with rare, disabling, sometimes fatal genetic disorders, and saying to myself 'wow, I wonder what it would be like to be them -- to never have a chance at a normal life.' Well now I ****ing know, now don't I? I hope you can seriously relate somehow, whether with general family history or feelings.
     
  49. In some cases it is difficult to differentiate ADHD from extreme difficulty. I did fine in high school, but I never had to study since high school was a joke. College was another story. I never studied in high school and screwed up supremely in college. A shrink suggested that I take ADHD meds, but my parents decided otherwise.

    Long story short, I matured and took the meds after military service. I have done extremely well since then. But there is always the nagging suspicion that maybe I could have done as well on my own. I don't know if it is arrogance, but I do not like the idea that I cannot make it in my chosen career field without meds.

    I hate having a sinusoidal attention span. It is awesome when on meds, but horrible when they wear off. I have reached the point where I would rather be near average and consistent rather than awesome on meds and sucky otherewise. Surgery is my passion, and I seriously doubt that I will be able to take a break to take my meds. The bottom line is that I was prescribed the meds, possibly unnecessarily, and that they are now tied to my competence as a student. I am going out on a limb and quitting the meds. If I do not make it through med school, then I take it as an omen. I am not extremely altruistic, but I do not want to risk someone's life if I cannot hack it on my own.

    People that suffer from genuine ADD please do not take this as an insult or defamation. I just do not know if I have genuine ADD or if I was just medicated unnecessarily. I will gamble on the idea that I was for now.
     
  50. mai mai

    mai mai

    Joined:
    04.18.09
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    Location:
    Hawaii
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    SCT is characteristics associated with ADHD/ADD and ADHD-I/ADD-I. ADD-I is all the same symptoms as ADD except for the hyperactivity or impulsiveness.

    The way that I think of it is that "we" are stronger than anyone else that is "normal." Being normal is overrated! =) Only you can be the judge of how much you enjoy life. Who is out there that can say that I enjoy life more than you, or you enjoy life more than me.

    I understand how you feel and I have felt a lot of the same things. I felt that I was incapable of doing things the same way as other people. I was unable to be normal. I felt I couldn't function like others. I envyed normal people that could focus and have an attention span more than me. I hated being caught daydreaming or not following a conversation. My friends use to shout "snorkle" every time I would say something random or changed the subject. It is really hard and trust me it just takes time.

    You just need to not look down at yourself. That is the worst thing that you can do. Take thing one step at a time. Know your limit and work on it. For example, when I study I only allow myself to study as long as my attention span then take a break walk around and then go back to it and repeat what I did. It has helped and I average about an hour to an hour and a half before I get up to do something else. For me caffiene is a BIG BIG help. It is just like taking meds except the rude side effects. It increases my attention span with less day dreaming. If you keep thinking that you are not normal or unable to do something. You won't be able to do it!
     

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