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Name that specialty...

Discussion in 'Allopathic' started by amakhosidlo, 09.22.12.

  1. amakhosidlo

    amakhosidlo Accepted

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    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    Starting the process of narrowing down choices, looking for ideas on fields:

    About me:
    240<Step 1<250
    "Top 10" school (Whatever that means)
    1 backwater research pub, another more prominent upcoming, but I'll be 3rd or 4th author

    Likes:
    Operating/Procedures. Doesn't have to be cutting per say, but working with my hands would be a plus.
    A life outside of medicine. Not "Lifestyle" or cush, just want to be able to ski a couple times/wk, maybe go on vacation every once in a while.
    Big, technical, tangible, focused problems with an identifiable solution (Things I can fix, eventually, even if the process is a sonofabitch)
    Patient interactions & Continuity
    Old people. VA patients in particular
    Technology & big fancy toys.
    A dash of diagnosis & medicine in general (For example, ortho turned me off because it seemed to lack those things, just left the operating)
    A dash of Research



    Dislikes:
    Surgeons, surgical culture (Biggest argument against G-surg for me right now are the surgeons I've worked with so far)
    Butt-pus (Or things with the words "Draining" and "Sinus" in them)
    Social work

    Recommendations?
    Last edited: 09.22.12
  2. Nymphicus

    Nymphicus kane o ke kai Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor

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    ENT, maybe.
  3. DrBowtie

    DrBowtie Responsible?!?! PGY3 Moderator Emeritus

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  4. eHombre

    eHombre

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  5. TheJanitor

    TheJanitor

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    If you can live without procedures heme onc/radonc could fit.
  6. todds

    todds Member

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    Go to top IM program with your score --> GI. The only one that really fits everything you mentioned. Lots of old people needing scopes. Interventional Cards maybe but lifestyle not good.

    Another option is Ophthalmology, Possibly Anesthesia if you dont need big toys, possibly interventional radiology if you can cancel out the patient interaction part. ENT, Uro, not a lot of medical problem solving. that about sums it up.
  7. gasblaster

    gasblaster ASA Member

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    Ophtho: Procedures, lifestyle friendly, focused problems with identifiable solutions, patient interaction and continuity, old people, technology, and research. Only hang up would be that it obviously has a very focused scope of medicine.
  8. FSU2013

    FSU2013

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    Interventional radiology - involves a ton of procedures without the super long surgeries; sees a lot of different pathologies with some complex stuff; big/fancy toys - check; life out of medicine w/ nice paycheck; research opportunities
  9. duckie99

    duckie99

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    so essentially you want to be a surgeon but don't like to deal with surgeons... I mean you can't have your cake and eat it to.

    First decide between surgery vs non-surgery. All surgical fields are essentially the same with the culture. To me is sounds like you want to do surgery. I think you just have to accept the more hardcore culture. You'll see that kind of stuff in cards, GI, and IR as well.

    If surgery pick a field (your scores can make you pretty competitive for most - uro may fit what you like the most). If non surgery (i.e. NO OPERATING ROOM) then decide patients or no patients; then kids vs adults. This will narrow down your list greatly.

    it's a long hard process to pick a field. Search the internet, watch videos, try to get more expose on rotations, etc. Then make a decision and try to get some research before you apply for residency as that would be greatly beneficial to the match.



    not all surgical fields have that douche culture you refer to. If you like the OR and like to operate do surgery. Remember that medicine fellowship fields like cards, GI, etc are at the core "medicine" and it simply is a different thought process with those guys vs surgeons. There's a pretty good post in the surgery forum about it.

    http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=557474
    see the post by mimelim on page 1



    edit: on the note of lifestyle, which I agree is important, should not be something that makes or breaks a field for you. Residency will suck hours wise pretty much no matter what field you choose. If you have a light day you really need to go and study. The only fields with fairly easy residencies are rad onc and pmr. However when all is said and done and you are out in the world, you can essentially set up your own schedule. In surgery expect to operate 2-3 days/week and 2-3 clinic days with weekends off unless you are on call (your PA, NP, or doc on call will round on patients over the weekend). this gives you at least a few weekends off every month (only emergent surgery is done on the weekend). The same is essentially true in medicine (no colonoscopies on weekend) - just realize that in cards and GI you will likely have clinic 4 days/week and procedures 1 day.
    Last edited: 09.22.12
  10. GuyWhoDoesStuff

    GuyWhoDoesStuff I got the skills to pay the bills

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    You were looking good for Derm until you poo-pooed the butt pus.
  11. Shnurek

    Shnurek

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    Except the starting salary is about half that of gas and radiology
  12. chrisisinnocent

    chrisisinnocent Elbow deep

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    Sounds like IR could be your thing. Procedures galore but no surgeons, you get to fix stuff and move on.
  13. RadicalRadon

    RadicalRadon

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    Lulz, the idiot returns! False, false, false. In 2010, the median ophtho salary was 376,943 (source: MGMA 2010 survey). It was much higher for ophtho subspecialties (retina was over 600k median).

    --

    Mind you, this is the same data that Shrek requested on the SDN MGMA thread. Haha, penis envy is a biatch, huh, Shrek? :cool:
    http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?p=12555923#post12555923
    Shrek Quotation: "Are ODs on this? If so can someone send it to me please PM, thank you."
    http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=817247&page=4

    Don't worry dude, you might be able to find a job at Lenscrafters when you graduate. I'd worry more about your personality making it a very brief experience though.

    --

    Updated 2012 MGMA data:
    http://www.mgma.com/physcomp/
    I can't afford access but it does tell you specialist median is $384,467
    Last edited: 09.22.12
  14. gasblaster

    gasblaster ASA Member

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    Was money in his/her description? Yeah didn't think so.
  15. Shnurek

    Shnurek

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    The idiot is usually the one that misses a key word: "starting" salary or the one that cannot spell a simple name of a forum poster correctly.

    Now for some direct quotes from the ophthalmology forum:

    Scroll down to page 18: https://www.thehealthcaregroup.com/Productdownloads/2009PSSSreport.pdf

    Seems like $165,000 in all environments rural and urban is the mean. Median is probably lower.
  16. RadicalRadon

    RadicalRadon

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    n=1, bro. I know two ophtho fellows personally at my institution who just took positions starting in the 300s. Anecdotal data is cool, dude.

    The 100k-200k salaries are private practice groups in highly desirable cities (SF, LA, etc.) that hire desperate ophtho residents with ridiculously low starting salaries with the promise of much higher salaries if they stick around for a while. They get worked hard and don't move up in the group... more often than not, it's a scam but it let's the group get cheap labor and the new attending to get a foothold in a competitive market.

    Tell me this isn't true. I'm sure you know a ton of MDs personally who tell you the "truth" about optho salaries. Me, I don't have access to MDs, so I have to rely on the de facto industry standard for salary compensation.

    A dunce is one who doesn't realize when a "misspelling" is a direct insult. I'm calling you SHREK because I'm literally picturing this guy sitting at the computer with one tab on a pornsite and another on sdn.
    [​IMG]



    Edit:
    LOL, nice link, shrek. Did you miss the "incentive arrangement" component? It's salary plus a productivity bonus. Total compensation will be much higher than base. In addition, they state how long until partner... when salary becomes just a fraction of total compensation. Not to mention the switch to a 15% tax rate!

    A first year IB analyst makes 70k salary and a 70k bonus... I guess by your definition the "starting salary" is 70k. Hmmm...

    Also, your data is from 2006-2009. That starting salary should be at least 30k higher in 2012.

    Nice link though. It demonstrates perfectly how lucrative those positions are.


    Well, successful troll job. Back to the main discussion.
    Last edited: 09.22.12
  17. Shnurek

    Shnurek

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    You sound pretty mad. You'll sound even more mad when I tell you that optometry scope of practice is increasing every year. They just passed the laser surgery law in Kentucky, and they now allow injections by Optometrists for treatment of eye diseases in West Virginia. We are taking over, slowly but surely. More ophthalmologists retire every year than are trained. Get used to the times, obamacare for the win. They support us :)
  18. RadicalRadon

    RadicalRadon

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    Blah blah, I'm not worried about ODs. That's your fabricated issue. Newsflash: I support ODs too. We should utilize their skill set in a way that is responsible, SAFE, and contains cost. ODs doing posterior chamber surgeries will lead to patient death. It won't happen.

    I just think you're an imbecile. I enjoy refuting your arguments because it shows that I am the MD are you are the OD... and all is right in the world. :smuggrin::laugh:


    Also, I notice how you didn't respond to my reply with anything credible. Aw, we wuv you and your funny games.
    Last edited: 09.22.12
  19. amakhosidlo

    amakhosidlo Accepted

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    ...ANYWAY...

    Precisely.

    Yeah see here's the thing about surgery. I guess I don't mind the culture so much as I mind the people. Does that make sense? I've met surgeons, real mellow old-school guys that made the pimping and the passive-aggressive whatever...they made it tolerable, or I guess made it seem like it had a point: To make you question what you know, and redouble your efforts to solidify that knowledge. On the other hand, I've also spent months with snipe-y *****holes that hated their lives, or guys that were obviously too dumb for ortho that still had their heads up their *****es and took it out on everyone else. And unfortunately it seems like the later two make up 90% of surgeons. Interestingly, the ortho guys have been consistently more enjoyable to work with. Never worked with any of the other disciplines.

    I know atmosphere is hugely variable, so are personalities. But I guess in general trends I'm looking for the least malignant, most civil surgical field. If that doesn't exist, then the most technical non-surgical field that still has some thinking involved.

    Uro...I actually hadn't thought much about, but now that it's been mentioned in this light it really does match up with quite a few of my interests. Hmm.

    Interventional radiology I've actually given a lot of thought to, but there's a lot that worries me about it. First, it seems like there's the turf war going on between IR and Vascular, and on top of that there are a bunch of interventional fellowships popping up through the IM specialties (Interventional nephrology, for example). It seems like the perfect fit but I have huge doubts with regards to its future/stability/job prospects

    Rad. Onc is actually at the top of my list so far, but the lack of hands-on aspects is definitely a bit of a turn-off.

    Cards seems on the same level as neurosurg in terms of work/life balance. The opposite of good.

    ENT: I don't know why...ENT just seems boring. Can't put my finger on it...

    Optho: I have a weird thing about eyes and sharp/pointy things. Blood & gore? Fine. Pus & sh*t & puke? Whatever. Eyes & needles? NOPE.

    Gas...boring.

    Rads: Actually fits my personality really, really well. I just think I'd miss patient interaction too much, and would probably get bored after a while.
    Last edited: 09.23.12
  20. RadicalRadon

    RadicalRadon

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    Sorry for the thread derail.

    Wait, don't you go to UWashington? Haha, aren't you guys supposed to do family med in Idaho... haha, i kid...

    I wouldn't worry too much about turf for IR. You can do a PP w/ a mix of IR/DR. Radiology really is an amazingly fun and interesting field. There are IR practice models with clinic if you really feel a need to have patient continuity.

  21. Kaputt

    Kaputt

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    Urology is for you. Here's why:
    1. Obviously it's a surgical field with operations
    2. It does offer a good lifestyle relative to other surgical fields
    3. Lots of rewarding outcomes
    4. Lots of patient continuity
    5. Old people are your people
    6. Lots of big fancy toys
    7. Tons of medicine in addition to the surgical aspect
    8. Lots of research options available
    9. The surgeons and residents themselves are more laid-back than general surgeons (stereotype, but pretty much holds true)
    10. Pee, not pus, unless pus is in the pee

    It pretty much hits everything on your list
  22. Kinis

    Kinis

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    .
    Last edited: 03.02.13
  23. Sheldor

    Sheldor

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    You can make a career in Rad Onc spending 2-3 days in the OR easily at an academic center. If the only him holding you back from Rad Onc is the lack of procedures, look into brachytherapy for prostate and gyn cancers.
  24. Lanolin

    Lanolin

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    ENT and Urology are cool, but EM is even better! Still get to be a doctor, work with your hands and others, and it's shift work!
  25. Geekchick921

    Geekchick921 Holy schnikes, I'm a 4th year! Moderator Emeritus

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    Old people, fixable problems, and fancy gadgets makes me think Urology.
  26. armybound

    armybound future urologist. Moderator Emeritus

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    for sure. sounds like uro 100% to me.

    I'd do a rotation in uro and check it out.
  27. flodhi1

    flodhi1

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    Nice to see that you're still trolling in the Allopathic forum even after 6 months of me last seeing you troll around. You systematically go to Medical student, resident and Physician forums to talk about how great Optometry is which is great and all but has absolutely nothing to do with us. Quite frankly we don't care. Please take your trolling comments out of the Allopathic forum and take it back into the Optometry forum.
  28. Koan

    Koan ASA Member

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    Gamma knife!
  29. Shnurek

    Shnurek

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    but, but, I'm the optotroll :D
  30. lazymed

    lazymed Not really lazy

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    Except as an EM doctor you get crapped on by alomst every specialty in the hospital for your "dumb" consults. You're expected to master everything, although you'll likely master nothing. At least as a urologist you'd be an expert in a field, you actually fix problems that present to you (as opposed to calling consults), and you don't have to work ar night or weekends anywhere near as often as EM docs do.
  31. duckie99

    duckie99

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    we all like to crap on EM but is this really true in private practice? A consult no matter how dumb = money in private practice; whereas a consult no matter how great = more work in academics. Totally different mindset I think.

    Otherwise your comments about having to be comfortable knowing a little about a lot will have to be acceptable for a person considering EM. It is a hands on field but there generally is no continuity, you deal with a lot of crap from patients and other physicians, and you'll be working at the same level as a EM trained NP in many regards.
  32. amakhosidlo

    amakhosidlo Accepted

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    Stop feeding the troll.
  33. RadicalRadon

    RadicalRadon

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    who i wouldn't trust to shine my shoes.
  34. Shnurek

    Shnurek

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    Its OK. I'll let you shine mine though.
  35. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Administrator SDN Senior Moderator Lifetime Donor

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    So much hate for General Surgeons. :oops: While the OP may find that the culture or the personalities in *his* experience are unpleasant, that is not always the case especially out in the community (where ******* general surgeons are not going to get referrals).

    At any rate:

    EM - not a good choice for someone that wants to be a surgeon; procedures are not surgeries. Same goes for Rad Onc, but the stupendous salaries might make you feel better. Do you have a PhD? That helps for Rad Onc.

    URO - good choice given the pros/cons you've listed

    ENT - I loved it; once you get out of Peds ENT, there is a lot of interesting work with H & N cancers, facal plastics, H & N endocrine, etc. Sometimes wish I'd done a medical school rotation, had I known.

    GS has a lot of fellowship/practice options and not all of us are *******s, despite what you might think. :p
  36. peteB

    peteB

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    wow dude, check your ego...
  37. Shnurek

    Shnurek

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    lol I only talked like that to him because he started cursing first. Called me an idiot. So maybe you should read up on what your professional buddy wrote there to provoke me.
  38. flodhi1

    flodhi1

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    :laugh:
  39. peteB

    peteB

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    who are you calling my buddy, I don't even know who he is... regardless, that's no excuse for you to respond the way you did... "but, but he started it!!" that's what 5 year olds say...
  40. Shnurek

    Shnurek

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    He's in the same profession as you. Revenge is a very primitive human social interaction. Ranging from 5 year olds to the United States nuking Hiroshima and Nagasaki because "they started it at Pearl Harbor".
  41. peteB

    peteB

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    He is in the same profession as me? So what? I don't see things as "people in my profession" vs "people in other professions"... Seems like you do. Probably because you have an inferiority complex about your own profession. That's why you are constantly in a different profession's forum trying desperately to put that profession down in a thread on a completely different topic... LOL!

    "Revenge is a primitive human interaction".. So you are a "primitive human" I see. That's too bad. You should work on becoming civilized!

    And now I will stop feeding the troll.

    :)
  42. flodhi1

    flodhi1

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    :thumbup:
  43. RadicalRadon

    RadicalRadon

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    ^lol what a dumb, simplistic interpretation of Truman's decision.

    I didn't "call" you an idiot. I just pointed out you are one. You gave further evidence in the quotation above. This is now a referendum on your lack of intelligence and social interaction.
  44. Stacker

    Stacker n = 1

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  45. flodhi1

    flodhi1

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    lol@ your Avatar.
  46. Renaissance Man

    Renaissance Man Saving the World

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    +1, I keep watching, and hoping that somehow one of them will pull out a huge kick into the other one. Hasn't happened yet, I'll keep watching and let you all know if anything changes.
  47. Shnurek

    Shnurek

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    Shows your lack of intelligence by judging someone's intelligence, not based on an IQ test, not based on how they perform in their day to day lives but instead through forum posts. And for social interaction grading based on internet forums?...you kidding me brah?

    I detect a major jealousy complex that evolves into internet rage. Because ODs can do all these things without going down the beaten path that is allo and osteo school.
  48. VA Hopeful Dr

    VA Hopeful Dr Senior Member

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    This is a big enough point that I think it needs a second mention.

    In med school, I hated the general surgeons. In my residency (unopposed family), where the surgeons are all private practice, all of a sudden I enjoy their company.

    They have to be nice or they don't get patients (this applies to all specialists actually, the jerks in my corner of the private world are all primary care/OB). Its amazing what a powerful motivator $$$$ is.
  49. RadicalRadon

    RadicalRadon

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    I'm glad you figured me out. My gross insecurity about missing out on being a baller OD is what drives me. Dominating at an elite medical school has been a small consultation, but I often dream of what could have been... :(

    Thank you for your insight and the courage to defend your noble self.
  50. amakhosidlo

    amakhosidlo Accepted

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    This seems to be the recurring theme when I talk to G. Surg residents & Fellows. Whether it be ENT, I.R, what have you.

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