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New to this, just a general question

Discussion in 'Podiatry Students' started by gobeavers, 11.12.05.

  1. gobeavers

    gobeavers Member

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    Hey guys,
    I have a few general questions. I applied to temple and I will be interviewing there in early december. This is the only Pod school I applied to in addition to DO schools. I am very interested in the ability to specialize right away and the idea of not having to be on call is very appealing to me.
    What can I expect for the interview at Temple?
    Is the school's reputation good, are they placing their students in top residency programs?
    Also, if you have high enough grades, could you do your residency at a university hospital such as yale, columbia, ucla ect..?
    I feel like the more I know about the profession the more prepared I will be for the interview...learning about podiatry has for sure made me much much more interested in it, so I really appreciate your answers to my questions!
    thanks again!
  2. gsrimport

    gsrimport Senior Member

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    I haven't interviewed there yet but when people ask about the best podiatry schools, temple normally comes to mind. However, if you have good grades in podiatry school, you would get a good residency program regardless of which school you went to. Some programs might be affiliated with some hospitals though.
  3. dpmgrad

    dpmgrad Senior Member

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    As a TUSPM (Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine) grad, I can tell you that TUSPM offers a pretty sound foundation. As mentioned in the previous post, Temple is usually mentioned amongst other schools as being some of the schools with a good reputation. TUSPM's curriculum has a more heavier slant towards Podiatric Surgery. I can not really comment on the other schools' curriculum as I did not attend the other schools. Despite the slant towards Podiatric Surgery, you still get a good foundation on Podiatric Biomechanics and other non surgical aspects of Podiatric Medicine. Your basic sciences are pretty much identical to the corresponding course in the Temple MD school, since they are taught by the same professors. I know that there are some other podiatry schools where the Podiatry students sit in the same classes as the MD students (Scholl) and the DO students (DMU and AZPod). Almost all of your non Podiatry rotations (Internal Medicine, Orthopedic Surgery, Anesthesia, Neurology, Infectious Disease, Vascular Surgery) are done at area teaching hospitals such as Temple University Hospital, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center at Presbyterian, Graduate Hospital, etc... Similar to the Allopathic Medical students, the TUSPM students are expected to take a shelf exam at the end of these rotations. Podiatry rotations are done at the Temple University Foot and Ankle Institute right next to the school and its satellite clinics. Students also rotate through Philadelphia VA, Podopediatrics clinic at Temple University Children's Hospital, Temple University new wound care center, TUSPM Surgery Center, etc....

    As mentioned earlier, irregardless of what school they are at, students that are at the top of their class will get into a decent residency program. Temple has done well in placing most of the students in surgical residency programs (majority of them in the PSR-24/36 and PM&S-36). Of course, by the time you have graduated from TUSPM, most of the residency programs will have converted over to the new residency model, where all of the Podiatry students will recieve some form of Podiatric surgery training. Despite of the previous posting, majority of the residency program are in a hospital settings since the new residency models require the residency program be either based out of a hospital / academic health center or be affiliated with a hospital / academic health center if based out of a surgery center or one of the Podiatry schools. This can be seen on page 9 in the CPME 320 document for PM&S-24/36 program at: http://www.apma.org/s_apma/seccpme.asp?CID=393&DID=17128
    There are many programs in major university hospital settings such as Yale, MGH, Beth Israel Deaconess, Temple University Hospital, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center at Presbyterian, Ohio State University Medical Center, UMDNJ - Newark, Cleveland Clinic, University of Texas Health Science at San Antonio, Detroit Medical Center (Wayne State), Loyola University Medical Center, etc... You do need to realize that some of the top Podiatrc Surgical Residency progarms are not based on the University hospital settings. You can find some of them at the local teaching hospitals, such as Tucker (Emory Northlake Regional Medical Center), West Penn (Western Pennsylvania Medcal Center - Temple University affiliate [this does NOT mean that it favors TUSPM students]), Seattle (Swedish Medical Center), Northern Virgina (INOVA Fairfax Hospital), etc.... When evaluating a Podiatric Surgery residency program, do not eliminate a residency program that is not at a university hospital before fully evaluating that residency program.
  4. gobeavers

    gobeavers Member

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    thanks for your input guys, that helps alot. Again, the more I learn about the school/profession, the more i am interested. I look foward to my interview there, a suite is appropriate right?? How is philly?
    Thanks again for your answers guys!
  5. gsrimport

    gsrimport Senior Member

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    DPMgrad is one of the most active members on this forum. What is the difference between PSR 36 and PM&S 36? I thought graduates of PSR 36 residency could basically do anything including rear foot reconstruction. DPMgrad, do you know the difference between the 3 year residencies and the 4 year residency offered by temple? Thanks.



    Beaver fan, when are you interviewing there? Mine is coming up in 1 week.
  6. gobeavers

    gobeavers Member

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    I will interview there on december 2nd. It looks really nice, so i am excited, even though I have no idea what to expect. Do you think the interview will be tough, what are you planning on wearing, i am thinking a suite....

    mike
  7. jonwill

    jonwill SDN Senior Moderator Moderator Emeritus

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    There is no difference between PSR-36 and PM&S-36. The 3-year residency under the old residency format was termed a PSR-36. The new format (due to complete in 2006) is a PM&S-36. (ie the PSR terminology will be gone)
  8. gsrimport

    gsrimport Senior Member

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    jonwill,

    Thanks for your post. I pmed you.

    gobeaver,

    I highly recommend you wearing a suit, everyone else did at my interviews. You are interviewing for a professional school so you should look as professional as possible :thumbup:

    From my experience, the interviews at the Podiatry schools were easier than the DO schools because podaitry is already a specialty and upon graduating, you're a specialist. As long as you know why you have a passion for this, know your application and able to communicate, you'll be fine. Have you shadowed a podiatrist yet?

    As for the DO interviews, they were much more broad which made it more difficult to answer. In addition, they get more applicants so they can ask more questions that either breaks you or makes you from other applicants if you know what I mean.

    Another thing about podiatry is that, the field is becoming more known and you will graduate as a surgeon of the lower extremity. Certified podiatrist with 3 yr residencies can assist in surgery outside of the lower extremity in many states. The curriculum is very rigourous and comprehensive but it will be rewarding if this is your passion.

    I really can't say this about DO schools because 90% of them end up in primary care. Personally, after shadowing family practioners and podiatrist, I was more appealed to podiatry because the illnesses I saw were much more devastating and being able to help them and improve their lives makes me feel that good. You have to do very well in the DO school to specialize in surgery. With insurance cuts everywhere, I feel that primary care doctors are working harder for less but you get to see a variety of patients.

    I think one of the tougher questions that you'll face is that why did you apply to DO schools and DPM schools.
  9. gobeavers

    gobeavers Member

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    Hey guys, thanks for all your input. I also feel that podiatry is really really amazing because it is somthing that you can sepcialize in directly. I am really excited for this interview, and I hope it goes well. I have been to a podiatrist, but have not shadowed one, i think i will try to do that before my interview. Are they pretty open to this? The majority of the feild is really really appealing to me, however, fitting orthotics and trimming nails seems kind of strange, however, helping diabetic patients cope with their illness, performing surgeries, working overseas ect...is extremely appealing to me. i admire all of you guys for your hard work in the feild or on your way into it.

    thanks again for all your help on this
  10. dpmgrad

    dpmgrad Senior Member

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    Actually, there is a difference between PSR-36 and PM&S-36 grad. Both graduates will be able to sit for both the ABPS Foot Surgery Board Exam and the ABPS Reconstructive Rearfoot Surgery Board Exam. However, only the PM&S-36 grad may sit for the ABPOPPM Podiatric Medicine / Orthopedics Board Exam.
  11. dpmgrad

    dpmgrad Senior Member

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    The difference between the 3 year residencies and the 4 year residency offered by Temple is that you have an extra year of training for your residency program. Graduates of both the 3 and 4 year residencies are able to sit for both ABPS surgery board exams. There are currently only two 4 year Podatric Surgical Residency program in the country and they are Temple University Hospital and University of Philadelphia Medical Center at Presbyterian.

    Good luck with your interview. If you have any questions, feel free to ask.
  12. dpmgrad

    dpmgrad Senior Member

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    Good luck with your interview. If you have any additional questions about Temple, feel free to ask.
  13. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member Moderator Emeritus

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    I've been wondering about this. So are they getting rid of the ABPOPPM? Will it only be around until the last ABPOPPM certified pod retires?

    I read something about the last year to join will be 2007?
  14. dpmgrad

    dpmgrad Senior Member

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    I am not sure if they are planning to get rid of ABPOPPM or not. However, they are doing whatever they can to survive. ABPOPPM / FACFOAM have supported the development of the DPM/DO option. I guess time will tell.
  15. diabeticfootdr

    diabeticfootdr

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    GET RID OF THE ABPOPPM!!! Who even want to tell people they are certified in something with so many letters! It's so rediculous. Why do we need that board when we have the ABPS? All just because the old undertrained DPMs need a board certification to get on staff at a hospital -- to perform hammertoes and bunions. Why not become certified in foot surgery (ABPS)? Because it's too hard, that's why. It's a BS board and the profession should stand to unify and have 1 certifying board.

    LCR
  16. jad

    jad New Member

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    Although there may be some validity to your who wants to be certified by a board with so many letters, do you not think that proper biomechanice and alignment is an important part of podiatry. most of these people choose to offer their patients something more than " thats right mrs. jones we are gonna have to cut you to fix you" In the history of our profession that is what has set podiatry apart from the orthopedic surgeons who cut first and ask questions later. How do you plan on exclusively doing surgery to make a living when if you know anything about billing and coding you know that one surgical fee includes depending on the surgery a global period of anywhere from 10-90 days and that anything that happens regarding that surgery in that period of time is included in that fee. patient gets an infection at the surgical site and you have to see him once a week for some time...all those supplies for dressing changes and time taken away from seeing others patients and it equals out to you not being paid much for your hardwork in the operating room.
  17. IlizaRob

    IlizaRob IlizaRob-erator Moderator Emeritus

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    I agree with Dr. Rogers in that we need to have 1 certifying board for podiatrists. Everyone else has one board. There is no reason for this confusion of so many certifying boards. I was talking to an APMSA board member the other week (while they were visiting the school) and he said that the majority of pods would like the same thing. The problem is with those that have been in the profession a long time, who are in higher positions governing these things and want to keep their prestigious ACFAS certification that they were grandfathered into without the training. This makes them feel superior. Dont worry, as they retire off things will change.

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