Menu Icon Search
Close Search

About the ads

  1. If you prefer the SDN Blue style, go to the bottom left of the page and select "SDN Blue"

Overpaid nurses

Discussion in 'Clinicians [ RN / NP / PA ]' started by Taurus, 03.28.08.

  1. Josh L.Ac.

    Josh L.Ac. MSA/LAc & BSN/RN --> AA-S

    Joined:
    03.23.06
    Messages:
    624
    Location:
    Kansas City
    Status:
    Non-Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member

    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)

    One of my wife's friends relocated to KC after Katrina and started an ADN program at a local community college while I was enrolled in my accelerated BSN. I spoke with her frequently and I do think her education was better in terms of clinical experience, but I knew more when it came to rationale. I cannot say if this was from the BSN or from my basic science background from first bachelor's degree [in biology].


    But yes, her clinical experience was much better.
  2. fab4fan

    fab4fan TiredRetiredRN Gold Donor

    Joined:
    06.29.02
    Messages:
    2,394
    Location:
    Desolation Row
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Probably your science background. The BSN completion program I'm finishing doesn't offer much more in the way of science than my diploma program did way back 23y ago. You probably got more hard core science than you would get in a nursing program.
  3. zenman

    zenman Senior Member

    Joined:
    04.01.04
    Messages:
    2,185
    Location:
    Gesundheit!
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    I personally think that the more book learning you have, even non-health related, the more "brain power" you have in order to make decisions that translate to better care and decision-making at the bedside.

    Not considering any personality differences, which of the following would you want if they all had equal clinical time:

    ADN with one year experience
    Diploma with one year experience
    BSN with one year experience
    MSN with one year experience
    Ph.D. with one year experience
  4. wisconsindoctor

    wisconsindoctor

    Joined:
    12.11.07
    Messages:
    307
    Most likely the MSN with one year expereince as the Ph.D. is more research focused.
  5. RAMPA

    RAMPA Pimpiro

    Joined:
    05.06.05
    Messages:
    397
    Location:
    Dallas
    Status:
    Non-Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    the one who was previously a respiratory therapist..... :laugh:
  6. zenman

    zenman Senior Member

    Joined:
    04.01.04
    Messages:
    2,185
    Location:
    Gesundheit!
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Go back to your room and play with your knobs...:D
  7. zenman

    zenman Senior Member

    Joined:
    04.01.04
    Messages:
    2,185
    Location:
    Gesundheit!
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Yes, but she has more "brain power" available. Remember they all have the same clinical experience.
  8. prairiedog

    prairiedog Junior Member

    Joined:
    04.18.06
    Messages:
    160
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Thus, you would take a lpn over a PA as "it's all about the practical experience and yrs in practice"
  9. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc2B2015

    Joined:
    08.25.01
    Messages:
    5,678
    Location:
    Taking an Away team....
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    no, thus I would take some pa's over some doctors.
    not the same playing field. I'm talking about groups that overlap in job descriptions.
    there are clinicians and there are nurses and other ancillary staff. very different.
    and yes, there are some np's I would take over some pa's.
  10. julie walker

    julie walker RN soon

    Joined:
    04.19.03
    Messages:
    147
    Location:
    Florida
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Amen!
  11. RAMPA

    RAMPA Pimpiro

    Joined:
    05.06.05
    Messages:
    397
    Location:
    Dallas
    Status:
    Non-Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    you forgot the about the MDIs..... :laugh:
  12. fab4fan

    fab4fan TiredRetiredRN Gold Donor

    Joined:
    06.29.02
    Messages:
    2,394
    Location:
    Desolation Row
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    I think you're off your rails on this one zenman, no disrespect.
  13. Josh L.Ac.

    Josh L.Ac. MSA/LAc & BSN/RN --> AA-S

    Joined:
    03.23.06
    Messages:
    624
    Location:
    Kansas City
    Status:
    Non-Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Agreed. My first two classes [and last two classes] of my FNP program are graduate research and advanced nursing theory. It is a total of 6 credit hours, estimate 6 hours of work a week for each X 14 weeks = 168 hours. How much of that is actually going to translate into making me a more effective nurse?


    Probably about two hours of take-home, apply it to the job knowledge.



    I am not kidding.
  14. zenman

    zenman Senior Member

    Joined:
    04.01.04
    Messages:
    2,185
    Location:
    Gesundheit!
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    One of the big arguments you see in nursing is that one degree has more clinical time than another. My argument is you take each level I mentioned above and give each exactly the same hours of clinical what would be the results?

    Would a person with less knowledge and one year of clinical be better than a masters person with one year of clinical?

    If research courses do not translate to better bedside care, there is a problem. Look at why liberal art grads are so valued by business. Hell, I can apply what I learned in Kayaking class to nursing. But I realize there is a problem in transferring knowledge from one area to another. My teacher wife says she can teach a kid how to study for history and he won't be able to take the same knowledge over to English.
  15. azPharmD2B

    azPharmD2B

    Joined:
    07.08.07
    Messages:
    345
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Status:
    Pre-Pharmacy
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    What a great attitude. You sound like the hundreds of pre-nursing students I am surrounded by that constantly bitch that most of their pre-reqs are worthless. Guess what, if you put in a half assed effort I'm pretty sure you won't get anything out of the class and of course you'll be able to say it hasn't helped you be a better nurse.

    I had to take a year of calculus based physics to get into pharmacy school, do you think I am ever going to use any of it? I won't be using a catapult to launch the pills into the patient's mouth, so why did I have to learn about gravity, acceleration, velocity, etc? Why? It teaches problem solving skills. It teaches you to evaluate a problem, gather data, formulate an approach, then to solve it and check to see if your answer is logical.

    Instead of going into a class assuming you won't learn anything, go in looking for opportunities to learn and apply those things. I have a friend who's been a nurse for 20+ years, she has a half dozen set of acronyms after her name. Do you think she uses every single bit of information she has ever been taught in class? Of course not, but that's more a reflection on the specific type of work she does than on her education. She could manage the entire nursing staff at a hospital if she wanted to. But she doesn't want to do that any more. Were those classes a waste? No, she might change her mind some day. I'd much rather have that knowledge waiting in the background in case I need it some day, than to be stuck in a situation I am clueless about because I wanted to do the minimum in school.
  16. jwk

    jwk AA-C ASA-PAC Contributor

    Joined:
    04.30.04
    Messages:
    2,990
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Maybe you should stick that foot in your mouth where is belongs. Josh has a couple of degrees as I recall - according to your profile, you don't have any yet. In addition, he's applying to an AA anesthesia program, so that means he has taken calculus, physics, organic, and biochem as pre-requisites. He obviously has more real-world knowledge and perspective than you do, since he's actuall been out in the real world.
  17. zenman

    zenman Senior Member

    Joined:
    04.01.04
    Messages:
    2,185
    Location:
    Gesundheit!
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    But he does have a point. Every single course you take does not have to be directly related to your field, unless you're in trade school. I think some teachers just do not stress how their courses will help you in many areas.
  18. Josh L.Ac.

    Josh L.Ac. MSA/LAc & BSN/RN --> AA-S

    Joined:
    03.23.06
    Messages:
    624
    Location:
    Kansas City
    Status:
    Non-Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member

    Are you serious? I would love to take classes like cadaver anatomy in my FNP program since it would translate into me being more effective with trigger point injections (and those funny little acupuncture needles too). I would also love to have a real, advanced pharmacology class instead of the barebones one offered in my [soon-to-be-over-on-cinco-de-mayo] FNP program.

    Unfortunately, instead of taking those classes [which I cannot take at another school and have it considered "elective credit"], I have to develop my own personal nursing theory with a color graphic representation. Wow. That ought to translate well into practice...which is the entire point.


    BTW, I loved my year of calculus-based physics. I never sweat so hard for a B in my life. Granted I didn't have a clue how to study back then...



    [Returns to finishing his literature review on "acupuncture in the treatment of chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis of the knee, and headaches" that is due tomorrow night for his advanced nursing research class. Actually going to try and get this published...]


    Wait, what did you say about needing to apply myself?




    Bro, I have to hit you with an analogy:

    You will learn a bit about boxing from jumping rope. It teaches you to keep on your toes plus works muscular endurance. But you know what translates much more into becoming an effective boxer than jumping rope?











    Actually boxing.
  19. zenman

    zenman Senior Member

    Joined:
    04.01.04
    Messages:
    2,185
    Location:
    Gesundheit!
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    "Much more" wasn't my point though, just that about any course will help you in some way.

    A few years ago there was a bodyworker who was holding seminars where participants worked with cadavers. Might cruise through some massage mags at your local bookstore and see if you can find it.
  20. azPharmD2B

    azPharmD2B

    Joined:
    07.08.07
    Messages:
    345
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Status:
    Pre-Pharmacy
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Maybe you should pull your head from your *** before assuming that someone who is pre-pharmacy has never been in school or worked doing anything else. My profile contains jack **** because I have elected to not fill it out. I happen to have 10+ years, 2 degrees, and a half dozen industry certificates in computer science. Half of that time being spent dealing with medical industry equipment and personnel.



    Oh and Josh, you're more than welcome to take my cadaver lab for me this upcoming year. I have no desire to have my hands on, in, or near a dead body. I couldn't even handle dissecting a dead cat in general biology.
  21. Tired

    Tired Still winning.

    Joined:
    12.12.06
    Messages:
    7,724
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    If that happened, we'd have a lot fewer FNPs.
  22. fab4fan

    fab4fan TiredRetiredRN Gold Donor

    Joined:
    06.29.02
    Messages:
    2,394
    Location:
    Desolation Row
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    I don't know. I am always picking the brains of the docs at work. I would love to get more education. I actually agree with Josh on this. The closer I look at the NP curriculum, the less enchanted I am. I'm not sure it's going to give me the education I want or need. No disrespect to the NPs here. I don't know if any midlevel degree would at this point.
  23. zenman

    zenman Senior Member

    Joined:
    04.01.04
    Messages:
    2,185
    Location:
    Gesundheit!
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    You can always pick up electives outside of nursing such as over in pharm...I've done that with psych and physiology.
  24. Whittier2006

    Whittier2006 Whitttttt

    Joined:
    07.04.07
    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Wichita!
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    In MY opinion, the reason there is a nursing shortage is because prospective nursing students become CNA's, and think it will be good experience, and then realize that they hate it. :rolleyes:

    Maybe that is just me....who knows.
  25. WannaBeDrMe

    WannaBeDrMe

    Joined:
    04.14.08
    Messages:
    304
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    I'm here to procrastinate and crash your thread. I feel so incredibly similar about my graduate program. It was 62 credit hours and so full of fluff it was like a Build A Bear workshop threw up in the social work building.

    The worst part were the overlapping assignments. Our faculty hated one another so they never collaborated. I had to write THREE AUTOBIOGRAPHIES over the 2 years. Not just something creatively small either... 50 plus page autobiographies, each from a diff perspective relying on different resources expecting different outcomes and different formats for the genograms to accompany each paper. TOTAL waste of my time... though, by the last one, I did finally take it seriously and learn some new stuff about my family.

    The idea with the social work busy work was that if we could explore our own experiences through at least 2 15-pg minimum papers per week, we would somehow gain the insight we needed to become effective clinicians. Sad part is... I never get insight through writing... I get it through experiencing, so it was all lost on me. Seriously, I gained 90% of my knowledge in my 1500 hr field experience and got very little, if anything, from the classes.

    The only bigger waste of my academic time/dollar came in undergrad. I was elem edu/psych and an edu class, art for the child, required assignments that literally required 15-20 hrs per week outside class time to complete. Paintings, etchings, $200 in supplies, sculpture, etc... stuff that NO elementary school kid could every actually do within the confines of a classroom. Nothing realistic... crazy ho.

    Thanks for letting me hijack your thread. My sis is in a MSN program right now and I have 2 aunts who went through it all but never really talked with them about their choices. I guess I missed the opportunity to bond with my sis over the poor use of some class's time.

  26. bryanboling5

    bryanboling5 Member

    Joined:
    10.25.03
    Messages:
    177
    Location:
    Lexington, KY
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121011475341071811.html?mod=2_1566_topbox

    This could offer some insight. The gist I got from the article is that there is not a shortage of nurses, but a shortage of pay. The article suggests that now that the economy is slow, a lot of nurses who aren't working as nurses are coming back. So, maybe the upside (money, benefits) of working full-time as a hospital nurse just didn't outwieght the downside (hours, time spent on feet, etc.) until now. The article also shows that this is not the first time we've seen a "surge" of nurses in response to a slow economy. FWIW...
  27. Josh L.Ac.

    Josh L.Ac. MSA/LAc & BSN/RN --> AA-S

    Joined:
    03.23.06
    Messages:
    624
    Location:
    Kansas City
    Status:
    Non-Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Zen,


    I guess the point I'm making is that I shouldn't have to add classes to the FNP program when they should already be an integral part of the program. My initial goal was to be a FNP specialized in pain management, so I was ready to add classes as electives that would be naturally beyond the scope of a typical FNP curriculum.

    But what I found was that the FNP programs do not really prepare the nurse to even function as a basic family practice nurse practitioner. Instead, time is spent on "advanced nursing theory" or writing literature reviews on a topic that is supposed to be later explored in the form of a research project...not to be published, of course, but rather PUT ON A POSTERBOARD AND DISPLAYED FOR THE NEXT UNIVERSITY "NURSING RESEARCH DAY"!

    Sigh.


    The point of a FNP curriculum should be to prepare the nurse to actually function adequately in practice. But looking at the curriculum, I'm just not seeing it.


    Now I have to get back to studying for the MCAT for AA school...
  28. Farmer Jane

    Farmer Jane Anti-ANA RN

    Joined:
    01.15.08
    Messages:
    354
    Location:
    Brew City
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    So true, sadly. I have a coworkers going through an FNP program. She says she barely reads and just BSes her way through everything. She scares me. The whole thing scares me, honestly. As I've said before, for my health care I'll stick with a physician.

    The thing that also bugs me is her idea that if she can just pass the program that's okay. I repeatedly say to nursing students: "Remember, you're not just studying for a test, you're studying for a career." As someone who wants to be solely responsible for the health care of others, she should have a drive to learn and it disturbs me that she doesn't.
  29. bryanboling5

    bryanboling5 Member

    Joined:
    10.25.03
    Messages:
    177
    Location:
    Lexington, KY
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Our instructors in nursing school repeatedly tell us, "remember, C=RN" as if just passing is sufficient. One of my big disappointments with nursing school is that it is so easy. Now, granted, I have a background in Biology AND worked in hospitals for several years before going to Nursing School, but the hardest thing about school is that the instructors have a lot of hoops you have to jump through in an attempt to MAKE it hard (it seems like they really like being able to say a high percent of students fail...).

    I am wanting to go on to get my MSN after a few years experience and being an NNP. I was hoping that an MSN program would give me the intellectual challenge...maybe not. Although, maybe NNP will be more challenging than FNP?
  30. Josh L.Ac.

    Josh L.Ac. MSA/LAc & BSN/RN --> AA-S

    Joined:
    03.23.06
    Messages:
    624
    Location:
    Kansas City
    Status:
    Non-Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member

    Around here, NNP make as much as midlevel anesthesia providers because in many hospitals, they do many procedures. I can't say anything about their training, but the few that I have met seem seriously high-speed.

    It was refreshing, actually.
  31. bryanboling5

    bryanboling5 Member

    Joined:
    10.25.03
    Messages:
    177
    Location:
    Lexington, KY
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    That's good to hear! I know that most Neo docs really respect them (they get along much better than most NP/MD I've seen). So, I'm hoping that says something as well. I had NO idea it paid as well as anesthesia! I did know there are lots of procedures (which I like).
  32. Farmer Jane

    Farmer Jane Anti-ANA RN

    Joined:
    01.15.08
    Messages:
    354
    Location:
    Brew City
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    I think a biology degree would give you quite the head start. :laugh:

    One thing to remember is that you can make it challenging if you want to. Never be the person for whom Cs and mediocrity are adequate. You won't have a different degree as a result but you will be a far better provider.
  33. bryanboling5

    bryanboling5 Member

    Joined:
    10.25.03
    Messages:
    177
    Location:
    Lexington, KY
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Well, I don't TECHNICALLY have a Bio degree, I needed another Botany class...:sleep: I think I have a Bio minor except that I didn't fill out the paperwork to get an official minor.

    Yeah, Cs are absolutely unacceptable for me. I got a B this semester and vowed that it will be the last time. That B was due to getting complacent and not studying (not slacking off, but not studying AT ALL until the final...).

    I have always said that I will work harder and go above and beyond and that extends to my MSN as well. I will be the guy who is taking the extra elective classes like someone mentioned.

    My worry is that you can really only judge the fitness of the profession by it's minimum standards. Technically, there are people out there who can do the absolute minimum and still graduate and go on to practice. THAT is what scares me about totally independant NPs. I'm sure there are a lot who know what they're doing, who went the extra mile, but as long as the minimum standards are so low...
  34. Taurus

    Taurus Paul Revere of Medicine

    Joined:
    07.27.04
    Messages:
    2,915
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    That's a very good point that Mundinger and her crew lose sight of. It's not the top people who will cause DNP's to be reined in, it's the bottom, incompetent ones. Can anyone say online DNP? :laugh: As the morbidities and mortalities start rolling in and the evidence is indisputable that the DNP's are ill-trained to handle their roles, then regulations will be put in place and laws will be passed to restrict what they can and can't do.

    All we need are a few high profile cases...:smuggrin: Why do you think I favor letting NP's and DNP's assume attending positions at major hospitals right now? Let them shoot themselves in the foot.
  35. fab4fan

    fab4fan TiredRetiredRN Gold Donor

    Joined:
    06.29.02
    Messages:
    2,394
    Location:
    Desolation Row
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Exactly. It shouldn't be dumbed down, but it is. If you're a rogue and ask a lot of questions, people look at you funny. One of my co-workers and I complain constantly about the lack of education in our unit. It's awful. The only education we get is from pinning down docs and asking questions. Some of them will take the time to teach. You just have to know who to ask.
  36. Farmer Jane

    Farmer Jane Anti-ANA RN

    Joined:
    01.15.08
    Messages:
    354
    Location:
    Brew City
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Isn't it aggravating? "Continuing Education" in hospitals involves being checked off on skills annually (yes, I can use a bladder scanner) and reading the occasional obvious article. Whoop-de-freaking-doo.
  37. Josh L.Ac.

    Josh L.Ac. MSA/LAc & BSN/RN --> AA-S

    Joined:
    03.23.06
    Messages:
    624
    Location:
    Kansas City
    Status:
    Non-Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    All while being taught by nurse educators that make more money than me.



    Actually we do have some that are high-speed, which makes me thinks they have to dumb-it-down so that they have a high pass rate...which leads us back to where we started.
  38. zenman

    zenman Senior Member

    Joined:
    04.01.04
    Messages:
    2,185
    Location:
    Gesundheit!
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    I hear you but you can't expect much from a profession that can't straighten out their entry level degree...
  39. Farmer Jane

    Farmer Jane Anti-ANA RN

    Joined:
    01.15.08
    Messages:
    354
    Location:
    Brew City
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    And those who are trying to standardize it can't even manage to promote the BSN without insulting half the profession...
  40. Jawbone

    Jawbone Ivy League, baby!

    Joined:
    12.05.07
    Messages:
    66
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member

    Not as well as CRNAs, but as well as first-year attendings where I work. Gotta love the union....

    And this is a whole 'notha topic, but I saw an article in the WSJ that talked about a DNP/PhD credentialing/certification exam after graduation that is to be developed in conjunction, and closely mimic the USMLE Step 3.

    Pretty sure I don't want to take anything like the Step 3 with only my 0-2 yr old patient population training. I'll leave that to the rest of you.
  41. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc2B2015

    Joined:
    08.25.01
    Messages:
    5,678
    Location:
    Taking an Away team....
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    "Pretty sure I don't want to take anything like the Step 3 with only my 0-2 yr old patient population training. I'll leave that to the rest of you."

    a generalist like an fnp or pa should be able to pass something like this without too much trouble. the pa boards are already based on step 2/step 3 so we wouldn't have to add any extra studying. most pa's study for step 2/step 3 and the md fp board prep for the pa boards.
  42. fab4fan

    fab4fan TiredRetiredRN Gold Donor

    Joined:
    06.29.02
    Messages:
    2,394
    Location:
    Desolation Row
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Seriously. A Master's degree in anything else is starting to look better all the time, except I'd have to pay for it!
  43. wisconsindoctor

    wisconsindoctor

    Joined:
    12.11.07
    Messages:
    307
    Please. An MSN is one of the best degrees a person can have. I'm not a nurse and nor do have any nursing training. The stuff I know about nursing has come from talking to nursing students and from when I worked in a hospital for 3 years.

    Sure an MSN may not be "hard," but I would take an MSN over a M.S. in Biology or any other life science field in a split second.
  44. BostonEMT

    BostonEMT

    Joined:
    10.30.07
    Messages:
    29
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    I agree, but do you have any idea how many hours per week many paramedics work regularly? I know guys who routinely do 80-90hr weeks all year because it's the only way they can provide for their families earning $18/hour (not to mention working in environments far more stressful than a lot of floor nurses).

    I have a good idea how stressful nursing is but nurses don't routinely get weapons brandished at them, bitten/spit at, screamed at and threatened by family members, walk in creepy houses to discover rotting corpses, roll up on the scene of an MVA with dad decapitated next to his alert and oriented eight year old, have patients refuse to acknowledge their infection status or give any information at all, etc.

    A nurse who isn't overburdened by their patient ratio who is pulling in more than 75K per year doesn't really have a whole lot to complain about from this perspective.

    EMTs and paramedics who make $12-19/hr, in fact, do.
  45. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc2B2015

    Joined:
    08.25.01
    Messages:
    5,678
    Location:
    Taking an Away team....
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    Totally agree. the most I ever made as a paramedic was 6.75/hr. they paid us so little because they knew we worked so many hrs(mandated 240/mo as 10 24 hr shifts min).
    we all worked overtime. one guy would take off 1-2 days/mo and work the rest of the time....
  46. Farmer Jane

    Farmer Jane Anti-ANA RN

    Joined:
    01.15.08
    Messages:
    354
    Location:
    Brew City
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    I missed where this discussion became an RN vs. paramedic competition.

    ETA: I agree they're underpaid--just has nothing to do with nurses.
  47. Tired

    Tired Still winning.

    Joined:
    12.12.06
    Messages:
    7,724
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Can we stop the love fest please?

    They're not underpaid. They're paid at a level matching their degree of education and the availability of others to fill their jobs.

    Lots of folks want to be a EMTs. Roll around in an ambulance, "first line" for medical care, wear the cute outfit. Plus it requires pretty minimal education and isn't particularly intellectually demanding. Follow the algorithm and drive to the hospital, if you have any questions, call the doctor on the radio.

    The fact that people don't make a lot of money in their job isn't an indication that they're underpaid.
  48. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc2B2015

    Joined:
    08.25.01
    Messages:
    5,678
    Location:
    Taking an Away team....
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 10+ Year Member
    your description is fair for emt-basics, not medics. until you have done it you really can't comment(sorry). paramedics today rarely contact the hospital for medical direction anymore. they are allowed fairly broad autonomy in decisions regarding significant interventions like crichs, RSI, etc some places have medics giving tpa in the field, putting in central lines, even perimortem c-sections....to me that merits better pay than a ups driver or pizza delivery guy....
  49. wisconsindoctor

    wisconsindoctor

    Joined:
    12.11.07
    Messages:
    307
    In most cases, you are paid what you are worth. That is the reality of employment. Most jobs in this world can be done by millions of people. A few jobs can only be done by those trained to do the job. An EMT job can be done by millions of people. A nurse can also be done by millions of people. A doctor can be done by a large amount of people, but only a select amount have the CORRECT KNOWLEDGE AND TRAINING to do the work of a doctor.

    An MET that knows how much they will be paid before getting the education and chose to live in Boston, New York, Los Angeles (and other large cities) have no right to complain. Sorry! That is the reality of it. It is a choice of action that a person CHOSE TO DO. A $14/hr job isn't bad, but it won't give you much in the largest citites.

    If you want to talk about a job that millions can do that reuires a lot of education and training that is easy work, look at your local family and marriage counselor. Counselor: there is a communication problem in your family. Family: No kidding! Counselor: so tell me about your last argument (verbal).............................
  50. Farmer Jane

    Farmer Jane Anti-ANA RN

    Joined:
    01.15.08
    Messages:
    354
    Location:
    Brew City
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    An EMT course is pretty basic, but I thought a paramedic was a two-year degree. Combined with the hazards they face and the hours, yes I think they should be paid more.

// Share //

Style: SDN Universal