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Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Journal of the ASPS

Discussion in 'Plastic Surgery' started by PRSJournal, Jan 28, 2013.

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  1. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    Watch this space for free articles, videos and other cool content from "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery," the official journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

    Check out PRS Resident Chronicles to follow the unique journeys of several young doctors as they go through residency in their respective Plastic Surgery Programs across the country.
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2013
  2. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Thank you to everyone at SDN for allowing us the opportunity to share with ya'll!

    To get started, I'll share a few articles and videos today. Let us know what kind of content interests you (Breast? Recon? Cosmetic?) and what type of content (Video? Articles? Video Discussions?)

    In Editor-in-Chief, Rod J. Rohrich's video introduction to the January issue, he and Scott Bartlett (Craniofacial Section Editor) discuss Pediatric Dysmorphologies and Syndromes. It's a good overview of a lot of pediatric/craniofacial content in the January issue.

    This next video is a classic, but may be of some interest if you are interested in the expert-approach to basic suturing, or if you are training/mentoring any medical students of your own.

    Basic Suturing for Medical Students

    And, as promised, here are two free articles from the January issue that you may find interesting.

    A Paradigm Shift in U.S. Breast Reconstruction: Increasing Implant Rates

    A Systematic Review of Antibiotic Use and Infection in Breast Reconstruction: What Is the Evidence?

    We'll be back with more later if you like. Feel free to follow us on one of our social feeds for more frequent updates.

    Thanks!
  3. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    The February issue just launched yesterday, and I'll share some free Original Articles with you guys a bit later (you can always go directly to PRSJournal.com and scroll down to the bottom to see the free offerings for the month, or read this blog post).

    But, I thought that this month's editorial, written by Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Rod Rohrich, and several PS Residents from Yale, would be of great interest to any Pre-Med or Medical Students out there interested in Plastic Surgery.

    If you residents know any, please share this article with them!

    So You Want to Become a Plastic Surgeon? What You Need to Do and Know to Get into a Plastic Surgery Residency
    Nagarkar, Purushottam M.D.; Pulikkottil, Benson M.D.; Patel, Anup M.B.A., M.D.; Rohrich, Rod J. M.D.

    Full Text.

    PATHWAYS TO PLASTIC SURGERY

    It is a truth universally acknowledged that plastic surgery is the most elusive residency in the United States. Unlike most other major surgical subspecialties, there are two well-defined routes to becoming a plastic surgeon—the independent and integrated pathways.1 The integrated pathway consists of 6-year training programs that accept graduating medical students, whereas the independent pathway consists of 3-year training programs that accept graduates of general surgery, neurological surgery, orthopedic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, otolaryngology, and urology residency programs. Both pathways are very competitive—in 2011, only 44 percent of U.S. seniors applying to integrated plastic surgery programs matched into the specialty.2 For comparison, the next lowest match rate belonged to orthopedic surgery, at 77 percent. The competitiveness of the independent pathway has diminished slightly since the training program was lengthened from 2 years to 3 years, but it remains in high demand, with the match rate ranging between 39 and 82 percent over the past 5 years.3,4 Clearly, plastic surgery program directors enjoy a buyer's market. Thus, the obvious question is, What do you need to do to maximize your chances of getting into a great plastic surgery residency? For the answers, we looked at the best available data in the context of the senior author's (R.J.R) 20-year experience chairing a large academic plastic surgery program, and our recent experience in the integrated pathway (P.N. and A.P.), and the independent pathway (B.P.) application process.


    THE INTEGRATED PATHWAY

    For a medical student applying through the integrated pathway, the first step to becoming a plastic surgeon is being invited for interviews. It goes almost without saying that applicants need to pass some minimum bar just to get their foot in the door. Data published by the National Resident Matching Program2 show that plastic surgery applicants to the integrated pathway (including the ones who did not match) are quite accomplished, with a mean United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score above 240, approximately seven publications each, and a 35 percent Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society membership rate. As a medical student, the first thing you need to do is to be honest with yourself: Do you have the basic prerequisites to be in the running for an integrated program position? If you are already a fourth-year medical student and you cannot clear this bar, there is likely not enough time to improve your grade point average and United States Medical Licensing Examination Step scores—or to compensate for them with more publications. You may be best served by pursuing the independent pathway. In fact, such a decision demonstrates commendable situational awareness. Remember, the integrated and independent pathways are designed to be equivalent, with the final 3 years of training in each pathway being generally identical.

    If you have been invited to some interviews, what do you do next? Many ask who the "ideal" candidate is.5–8 There is a consensus in the literature. The ideal candidate:

    * Graduates at the top of his or her class.

    * Has an excellent United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score.

    * Is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society.

    * Has published prolifically.

    * Is respected by his or her peers.

    * Demonstrates maturity.

    * Exhibits leadership qualities.

    * Has letters of recommendation from giants in the field.

    * Has completed rotations at every program with which he or she interviews.

    Unfortunately, there are probably only two candidates each year that fit this bill—everyone else is accomplished but not perfect. Fortunately, program directors know that for every Mozart (who composed his first piece at age 6) there is an Einstein (said to have had speech difficulties as a child). The "imperfect" applicant may end up being just as good a plastic surgeon or even better. For example, the senior author (R.J.R.) confesses that he was an imperfect applicant himself but somehow got into a great plastic surgery residency nevertheless.

    So how do you stand out in this crowd of excellent candidates?



    Follow the link to read the rest of the article!

    What do you think? Is this good advice to those seeking to get into Plastic Surgery Residency?
  4. Renaissance Man

    Renaissance Man Saving the World Bronze Donor

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    Is it possible to publish 7 papers while in medical school!? Also would you say that the research has to be in plastic surgery? That is an insane amount of research, IMO.
  5. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Thanks for your question! Sorry for the delay in getting back to you.

    While achieving 7 publications in conjunction with rigorous medical coursework remains an arduous task, it is feasible. With so many great candidates and so few plastic surgery spots, research can be critical in differentiating the applicants.

    This serves as the impetus for many plastic surgery applicants taking a dedicated research year. While research in plastic surgery demonstrates interest in the field and enables an opportunity to earn a letter from a plastic surgeon, it is certainly not mandatory.

    Plastic surgery programs desire candidates who display an interest in the scientific pursuit, that is searching for a solution to a scientific problem. Please let us know if you have any more questions.
  6. Valadi

    Valadi

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    RM, that data was taken from Charting Outcomes in the Match 2011 (http://www.nrmp.org/data/chartingoutcomes2011.pdf).

    If you look at the actual data, it is for "abstracts, presentations, and publications." Considering that out of one study you might get all 3, then 7 becomes a much more feasible number. Do not get discouraged! :)
  7. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Watch TWO Free video discussions this week:

    First, Amy Alderman discusses "Comprehensive Outcome and Cost Analysis of Free Tissue Transfer for Breast Reconstruction"

    Second, L. Scott Levin discusses Vascular Injury and Open Tibial Fractures.

    What do you think about these discussions?
  8. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    February 20th, 9:00pm eastern time. Rank list deadline. Twenty-three days until match day.

    Read our PRS Resident blogger's thoughts on waiting.

    How will you handle the wait?
  9. PRSJournal

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    If you're interested in a career in Plastic Surgery, then the controversy surrounding permanent weight reduction and abdominoplasty might be of interest. This FREE study from PRS attempts to replace hype with fact.

    ABSTRACT:

    Background: The question of whether or not abdominoplasty is associated with permanent weight reduction remains controversial. In coalition, should abdominoplasty be used as an adjunct for weight reduction in the overweight/obese patient?

    Methods: This retrospective patient case series attempts to determine the most important factors associated with weight reduction.

    Results: All patients undergoing abdominoplasty had weight loss beyond that of their resected pannus, with a minimum body mass index reached 11.6 ± 1.7 weeks after surgery. Weight loss is attributed to an increase in satiety by 75 percent (n = 15) of patients. Preoperative body mass index greater than or equal to 24.5 kg/m2 can be used to predict long-term weight loss with a sensitivity and specificity of 92.9 percent and 83.3 percent, respectively. Patients above this threshold achieved significantly more weight loss (−4.5 ± 1.4 percent body mass index) at 1 year compared with their lower body mass index counterparts (p = 0.014), as did those with pannus resections weighing greater than 4.5 lb (p = 0.01).

    Conclusions: Abdominoplasty performed on patients with a body mass index greater than 24.5 kg/m2 appears to be linked to sustained weight loss at 1 year. Satiety appears to be a prominent contributing factor, as does the amount of fat resected. Possible neurocrine mechanisms are discussed.

    CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, IV.

    Read the full article free here: http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsu...eduction_following_Abdominoplasty___A.36.aspx

    What do you think?
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  10. PRSJournal

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    Is the national attitude toward breast reconstruction changing?

    Read this FREE article on PRSJournal.com to find out:

    A Paradigm Shift in U.S. Breast Reconstruction: Part 2. The Influence of Changing Mastectomy Patterns on Reconstructive Rate and Method

    Abstract
    Background: The aims of the current study were to (1) measure trends in the type of mastectomy performed, (2) evaluate sociodemographic/hospital characteristics of patients undergoing contralateral prophylactic mastectomy versus unilateral mastectomies, and (3) analyze reconstruction rates and method used following different mastectomy types.

    Methods: Mastectomies from 1998 to 2008 were analyzed using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Mastectomies (n = 178,603) were classified as either unilateral, contralateral prophylactic, or bilateral prophylactic. Reconstructive procedures were categorized into either implant or autologous. Longitudinal trends were analyzed with Poisson regression and sociodemographic/hospital variables were analyzed with logistic regression.

    Results: Unilateral mastectomies decreased 2 percent per year, whereas contralateral and bilateral prophylactic mastectomies increased significantly by 15 and 12 percent per year, respectively (p < 0.01). Independent predictors for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (compared with unilateral mastectomy) were patients younger than 39 years, Caucasian and Hispanic race, private insurance carriers, treated in teaching hospitals, and from South and Midwest regions. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy is the only group with increased reconstruction rates throughout the study period (p < 0.01). Although implant use increased for all mastectomy types, it remains greater in bilateral and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy.

    Conclusions: There is increasing use of bilateral mastectomies in the United States, particularly in patients with unilateral cancer. Although implant use has increased for all mastectomy types, they are used most commonly following bilateral and contralateral prophylactic mastectomies. Changing mastectomy patterns are one factor underlying the paradigm shift away from autologous tissue to implant-based reconstruction.

    CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Risk, III.
  11. SDplastics

    SDplastics

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    Just wondering who you are? Posting for PRS...At UTSW....?
  12. PRSJournal

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    Hi! My name is Aaron Weinstein and I do most of the posting for PRS on SDN, Facebook, Twitter, etc. I'm the Managing Editor of digital media and supplements. But, Dr. Rohrich, the E-i-C, and other Ed Board members will chime in from time to time, especially with content-specific questions. So, you have the whole Editorial Office and Editor-in-Chief on the line in this forum!
  13. SDplastics

    SDplastics

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    Awesome.
    Will definitely want Rorich's response!
    Now I will be posting content specific questions.
  14. PRSJournal

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    Excellent! Feel free to post specific questions. And if you want to pose it directly to one of the Section Editors or the Co-Editor, we can get them to chime in too. There might be a few days delay between question and answer, but we'll get your questions answered!
  15. PRSJournal

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  16. Phloston

    Phloston SDN Lifetime Donor Lifetime Donor Gold Donor

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    The # of published papers is irrelevant, and any student overly focused on the # doesn't understand the point of research.

    What matters is the substance of the research (i.e. does it help to drive the field forward?)

    I'm doing research in novel materials used for craniofacial implants. If I get 3 solid first-author papers during my PhD I'd consider myself lucky.

    The only numbers any of us should be concerned about are our Step scores.
  17. maxheadroom

    maxheadroom Rhinestone Cowboy Moderator

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    1. Get good grades and get into medical school. While it's good to have a "long range plan," getting wrapped up with stuff that's half a decade away might distract you from the more important and more immediate tasks. If you don't get into medical school or you end up at a crappy medical school, all of your activities to get yourself on track for Plastics will have been wasted.

    2. Do well in medical school. Plastics consistently draws high-achievers out of medical school. I've seen applications from students who were doing lots of activities that they thought would help with their application, but their pre-clinical grades were average and their Step 1 score was unimpressive. Those applications frequently end up in the "maybe" pile (which is a soft "no").

    3. Be an interesting person. Study abroad. Develop interesting hobbies. Have fun. In our Integrated program, we interviewed people who had been professional musicians, chefs, dancers, and high-level athletes. And that was just this year. They all had good grades/high scores/research/excellent letters. And they had something interesting/unusual/different. Plastic surgeons tend to be social people who like to talk -- if you're some boring nerd type, we won't want to talk to you for very long in an interview and that's the kiss of death.

    4. Go into your third year clerkships with a goal, but keep an open mind. I can't tell you how many "hardcore" students have finally come into the clinical area of their obsession only to find that it really isn't what they wanted.
  18. PRSJournal

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    Hi! This is Aaron Weinstein from the Editorial Office. I've asked several of our Resident Bloggers to chime in with maxheadroom to give you some more thoughts on your initial questions. Great questions, by the way!

    While I await their responses, I wanted to thank you for your interest in PRS. We'll continue to post our free offerings here- and on our website (PRSJournal.com) and blogs.

    Some more thoughts for you on where to get some free PRS content:

    If you have an iPad, download our Free app. Though most of the issues are by subscription only (or for purchase) the first 6-8 issues are on there for free. There are also a few free Cosmetic supplements too, I believe. Check them out!

    Finally, we just launched a new journal, PRS GO (Global Open). All open access plastic surgery articles with the same rigorous peer review. Check it out! There are only ~10 articles on there now, but more will be published as this new journal takes off.

    Happy Reading!
  19. PRSJournal

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    DreadfulGlory, I got in touch with one of our Resident Bloggers, Jordan Ireton. She has a bunch of thoughts to share with you! Hope you find her answers useful! Jordan was just accepted to Plastic Surgery Residency at UTSW in Dallas. Read more of her thoughts on the medical school/residency process on our blog: PRS Resident Chronicles.

  20. svt boost

    svt boost Junior Member

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    Dreadful Glory,

    Thanks for the post--glad to see you are interested in Plastic Surgery. It is a great field.

    My name is Eamon O'Reilly, and I am a chief resident in plastic surgery graduating this June, and also a resident blogger for PRS. I haven't been on SDN for some time, but happy to be back!

    As Jordan stated, the road to plastic surgery truly starts in medical school. As an undergrad, the most important thing you can do is to prepare yourself for admission to medical school. That means grades, leadership, and research (oh, and don't forget to have fun once in a while too :)) Having a sound academic background of a solid GPA and a good MCAT score is pretty self explanatory, but the research and/or taking an early interest in plastic surgery is not.

    Pursuing research and shadowing a doctor is more about the process than it is what kind of research or what kind of doctor you have as a mentor. If you live in a small town, you would be better off following a busy and varied general surgeon to really get a good idea of what surgery itself is like; if you live in a big town, you are more likely to get a good experience with a plastic surgeon. Similarly, no one expects an undergrad, or a medical student for that matter, to have astounding research. It is more important to prove you can do the research, and learn the process. Sure, some medical students get patents, and occasionally and undergrad get published in Nature or Science, but it is pretty darn rare!

    Jordan posted some links, but take a read through some of the resident blog posts found here at PRS. I think this gives a really interesting view on being a modern resident.

    And finally--it always works out one way or another. Sure that sound a little generic, but if you keep an open mind as Jordan stated, you will find a niche in medicine that fits your personality and skill set. When I was in your shoes I wanted to be a pediatrician. Then, in medical school, I fell in love with general surgery--and of course as a general surgeon I wanted to become a plastic surgeon! Sometimes the circuitous route proves the most scenic.
  21. PRSJournal

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    No problem at all! That's why we're here! Let us know if you have any more questions!

    And we'll definitely keep letting you know what's free on PRSJournal.com!

    -Aaron
    PRS
  22. PRSJournal

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    Phloston, I showed your comments to one of the authors of the paper you're discussing, Anup Patel, MD (who also happens to be one of our Resident Bloggers), and he wanted me to pass on his thoughts.

    --Aaron, with PRS

  23. PRSJournal

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    Did you see April's free Video of the Month?

    Watch Fred Menick perform Pedicle Division from his CME article 'Practical Details of Nasal Reconstruction.'

    [​IMG]
  24. PRSJournal

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    Hi Everyone!

    Aaron here with another free video for you to watch. We don't normally set our Baker Gordon videos free, but for one week we've gone ahead and opened access to Part I of our most recent lecture.

    Take a look, and watch Scott Spear discuss "Mastopexy and Small Volume Breast Reduction: Control of Shape."

    It'll be free for one week, so watch it this weekend!
  25. PRSJournal

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    Attention all Plastic Surgery Residents:

    Our Resident Blogger team from Yale (Anup Patel and Ajul Shah) have two research survey opportunities for you.

    Help out by participating in both surveys and let your voices be heard!

    These results can help shape the future of plastic surgery training.

    Either go to their blog post at PRS or get the info below.

    Thanks!

    --Aaron

  26. PRSJournal

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    Aaron from PRS here.

    Ever wondered how many (wo)man-hours it takes to publish a manuscript in a journal like PRS?

    Well, our new Open Access Journal, PRS GO (PRSGO.com), has an aritcle on the subject. An article published in a medical journal about how long it takes to publish an article in a medical journal. How meta is that?

    The article is free, as are all articles on PRS GO.

    Check it out...the findings may surprise you: How Many Work Hours Are Requisite to Publish a Manuscript?
  27. PRSJournal

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    [​IMG]

    Hi Everyone. Aaron here with our selection of free articles from this month's PRS. Happy Reading!

    440 Consecutive Immediate, Implant-Based, Single-Surgeon Breast Reconstructions in 281 Patients: A Comparison of Early Outcomes and Costs between SurgiMend Fetal Bovine and AlloDerm Human Cadaveric Acellular Dermal Matrices
    The Contribution of Endogenous and Exogenous Factors to Female Alopecia: A Study of Identical Twins
    Social Media Use and Impact on Plastic Surgery Practice
    Prospective Outcome Study of 225 Cases of Breast Augmentation

    We also feature short-term free articles throughout the month of May. Please read and discuss the following articles:

    Breast Reconstruction Modality Outcome Study: A Comparison of Expander/Implants and Free Flaps in Select Patients (Free From April 30 - May 15)
    The Role of Different Methods of Nerve Ablation in Prevention of Neuroma (Free From May 16 - 31)


    In addition to reading the articles for free above, you can also watch the free video discussion:

    Charles E. Butler, M.D. discusses the May Breast article "A Comparison of Acellular Dermal Matrix to Autologous Dermal Flaps in Single-Stage, Implant-Based Immediate Breast Reconstruction: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis" by Krishnan et al.

    Additionally, we encourage you to read the 2013 PSRC Abstract Supplement for free, beginning this month!

    The free articles from the two most recent months, can always be readily found on the bottom of our homepage where you see the following logo:

    [​IMG]

    Happy Reading!
  28. PRSJournal

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    Hi guys I'm Donnell Moore, Peer Review and CME coordinator for PRS and I will be frequently posting exciting content for you. With that being said I want to bring you a recent entry from our blog, PRS Resident Chronicles. Dr. Anup Patel discusses why the Dallas Rhinoplasty Symposium is a worthwhile experience and compares Dr. Dean Toriumi to basketball great, Michael Jordan. Read below to find out what you missed. Full disclosure: Even though Dr. Rohrich hosts this meeting this blog was not solicited.

    The Dallas Rhinoplasty Symposium: A Must for All Residents

    by Anup Patel, MD, MBA

    When a resident must decide on what educational course to select, the constraints of finance and time are real making it critical that the course opted to attend provides the most "bang for your buck." A myriad of factors influence this decision with the opinions of other residents who have attended the course in the past perhaps being most important. This year I had my sights on the 30th Annual Dallas Rhinoplasty Symposium. Not only had some of our residents raved about the course, but also knew that with Dr. Rod Rohrich chairing the event one's time would be spent efficiently and effectively. After three days with the world's rhinoplasty experts, I assure you this course is the real deal and must be integrated into every plastic surgery residency training curriculum.

    On Friday morning, after a lecture by Dr. Rohrich on the "The 10 Essentials Steps of Rhinoplasty," we headed to the anatomy lab to see if we could transform these steps into a reality on the cadaver. The surgical procedures of a rhinoplasty such as delivering the lower lateral cartilages that these experts make look so easy in their books and videos (see links below) proved much more challenging than expected. Anticipating this, the course provides a dedicated faculty member for each cadaver table enabling real-time tips and pointers to overcome the otherwise difficult maneuvers. For example, Dr. Bardia Amirlak assisted me in finding the appropriate plane to separate the upper lateral cartilages from the septum to reach what has been dubbed the "nirvana of rhinoplasty." (Baker Gordon Rohrich Rhinoplasty Video: http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/Pages/videogallery.aspx?videoId=261&autoPlay=true).

    The cadaver lab enables one to become much more familiar and facile with gamut of cartilage grafts needed in the armamentarium of an excellent rhinoplasty surgeon. Moves that remain difficult to grasp for the first time on a cosmetic patient such as osteotomies or harvesting of septal graft can be quickly learned from the cadaver lab.

    Following the lab, we embarked on a series of lectures by these rhinoplasty experts gaining valuable insight into how they achieve such outstanding results. The in-depth, high-yield lectures accompanied by schematics and videos complemented the cadaver lab perfectly. The videos proved to be a tremendous educational resource with the surgeon who created the video walking the audience through the critical steps of each procedure. For example, Dr. Bahman Guyuron illustrated how he rasped the dorsal hump in an oblique fashion rather than a caudal-cephalad manner to avoid damaging the delicate cartilaginous framework. If one had any questions from the lecture, these could be texted to a number provided by the course enabling immediate answers from these experts.

    To drive home points further, the lectures were separated into different topics with each session concluding with a panel discussion. In my opinion, the learning one derives from these experts critically analyzing each other's results is unparalleled. No panelist deterred away from pointing out flaws of his colleague with many jovial debates occurring frequently among Dr. Mark Constantian, Dr. Jack Gunter, and Dr. Rohrich. One event that stood out because of its similarity to the NBA All-Star Slam Dunk Contest featured each panelist presenting his most challenging rhinoplasty case that was then rated in terms of degree of difficulty to address by the other panelists. Like the judges at the dunk contest, the panelists would raise a numerical card to rate the degree of difficulty of correcting the nasal deformity being presented; this was followed by a similar judging process of the post-operative results. Dr. Dean Toriumi, a Chicago rhinoplasty surgeon, did the equivalent of Michael Jordan's famous free throw dunk, when he presented his amazing results on a patient with a severely distorted cleft nose that drew a huge ovation from the audience. This panel epitomized the course replete with didactics teaching an attendee how to deliver a better rhinoplasty.

    Finally, this year commemorated the 30th anniversary of the symposium with a tribute to one of its founding members, the legendary Dr. Samuel Stal. Dr. Gunter, another founding member, delivered a heart-felt message about Dr. Stal describing his willingness to teach at all times. I share this because this is the attitude embodied and embraced by every faculty member at this symposium that ensures you will learn the art of a rhinoplasty. In short, The Dallas Rhinoplasty Symposium is a must for all residents who aspire to conquer the most challenging operation in all of plastic surgery: the rhinoplasty.

    References:
    Rohrich Link:
    http://www.qmp.com/product_dtl.php?...pecialtyID=6&QnSpecialtyID=13&bSubspecialty=Y
    Constantian Link: http://www.qmp.com/product_dtl.php?...pecialtyID=6&QnSpecialtyID=13&bSubspecialty=Y
    Guyuron Link:
    http://store.elsevier.com/Rhinoplasty/Bahman-Guyuron/isbn-9781416037514/
    Toriumi Link:
    http://www.amazon.com/Rhinoplasty-Dissection-Manual-Book-Video/dp/0781717833

    Visit the blog to see images from the symposium and please leave a comment for Dr. Patel.
  29. PRSJournal

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    Hi guys Donnell from PRS again and I'm bringing you a sneak peak into our upcoming June issue. This
    week we present the introduction to "Jaw in a Day": Total Maxillofacial Reconstruction using Digital Technology" by Levine et al. Read the abstract below, comment and don't miss out on the next issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

    Background: Tumors of the mandible are complex, often requiring replacement of bone, soft tissue and teeth. The fibula flap has become a routine procedure in large tumors of the jaw, providing bone and soft tissue at the time of the resection. In current practice, dental reconstruction is delayed for 3-6 months leaving the patient without teeth in the interim. This can be disfiguring and anxiety provoking for the patient. In this article, our group presents three patients with benign tumors of the mandible who undergo virtually guided resection, fibula reconstruction, and insertion of an implant retained dental prosthesis in one operation. In addition, we report our early experience using this technique in the maxilla.

    Methods/Results: We present a case series of 3 patients with benign mandibular tumors, and 1 patient with a benign maxillary tumor, who underwent total reconstruction using CAD/CAM
    technology in a single stage.

    Conclusion: In the right situation, total mandibular reconstruction is possible in a single stage.This is demonstrated by the successful outcomes of these patients.

    http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/blog/PRSonallySpeaking/pages/post.aspx?PostID=144
  30. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi guys Donnell from PRS again. Are you in search of a mentor? Check out some tips on finding the person who can help your career in the latest addition to our blog, PRSonally Speaking. Dr. Jon Ver Halen gives us his thoughts on mentorship and the easiest way to find the perfect one. Don't miss out and please comment with your own thoughts.

    Last edited: May 15, 2013
  31. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    SDN Partner
    Breast Reconstruction&#8212;It's Not Just About Breasts


    by Jordan Ireton

    Last edited: May 17, 2013
  32. doctormichael

    doctormichael Michael Fiorillo

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    thanks for this information .
  33. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi Everyone! Aaron with PRS here.

    The June issue just went up on the website today. You know what that means! A whole new slew of free articles. Read 'em while they're free!

    •Jaw in a Day: Total Maxillofacial Reconstruction Using Digital Technology
    •Are Systemic Antibiotics Indicated in Aesthetic Breast Surgery? A Systematic Review of the Literature
    •Nonfatal Sport-Related Craniofacial Fractures: Characteristics, Mechanisms, and Demographic Data in the Pediatric Population
    •The Role of Gene Therapy in Regenerative Surgery: Updated Insights
    We also feature short-term free articles throughout the month of June. Please read and discuss the following articles:

    •Infection following Implant-Based Reconstruction in 1952 Consecutive Breast Reconstructions: Salvage Rates and Predictors of Success (Free from May 29 - June 10)
    •215 Mandible Fractures in 120 Children: Demographics, Treatment, Outcomes, and Early Growth Data (Free from June 11 - 20)
    •The Role of Silicone Granulomas in Recurrent Capsular Contracture: A Review of the Literature and an Approach to Management (Free from June 21 - 30)

    In addition to reading the articles for free above, you can also watch the free video discussion:

    Maria Siemionow, M.D., discusses the June Experimental article "Nerve Transfers for Facial Transplantation: A Cadaveric Study for Motor and Sensory Restoration" by Audolfsson et al.

    Additionally, we encourage you to read the 2013 PSRC Abstract Supplement for free!

    Happy Reading!
  34. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi guys Donnell from PRS again with a new read from our blog, the PRS Resident Chronicles. Are your preparing for a transition as well? Read, comment and join the conversation as Dr. Eamon O'Reilly bids farewell and introduces our newest blogger, Dr. Jacob Unger.

  35. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi guys Donnell from PRS again. Dropping by to point you to more free content from PRS Journal. Check out the abstract from "Mentorship: Concepts and Application to Plastic Surgery Training Programs" by Kevin Chung et al. If you are looking for a mentor or hoping to become a mentor PRS has you covered. Read the abstract and follow the link for the full text.

  36. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi SDN Future Plastic Surgeons! Aaron here with a new blog post you might find interesting.

    If you're curious at all about the burns rotation in your residency, read this week's PRS Resident Chronicles by Yale residents Anup Patel and Ajul Shah: "Burns: The Ultimate Reconstructive Challenge"

    Drs. Shah and Patel are more than happy to answer any questions you may have as well. So leave some Q's and we'll get their A's!
  37. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi Everyone! Aaron with PRS. The July issue of PRS is up, and that means our latest batch of free offerings are now available for you to read without having to go to the library. So enjoy these free PRS articles and videos straight from your computer!

    Let me know if you have any questions or if there are any other articles in this issue that a bunch of you want to read and I'll see what I can do!


    •Surgical Anatomy of the Middle Premasseter Space and Its Application in Sub–SMAS Face Lift Surgery
    •Known Preoperative Deep Venous Thrombosis and/or Pulmonary Embolus: To Flap or Not to Flap the Severely Injured Extremity?
    •Severe Infectious Complications following Frontal Sinus Fracture: The Impact of Operative Delay and Perioperative Antibiotic Use
    •Trends in Autologous Fat Grafting to the Breast: A National Survey of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons
    •The Incidence of Vitamin, Mineral, Herbal, and Other Supplement Use in Facial Cosmetic Patients

    We also feature short-term free articles throughout the month of July. Please read and discuss the following articles:

    •Fat Grafts Supplemented with Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells in the Rehabilitation of Patients with Craniofacial Microsomia (Free from June 28 - August 1)
    •Prospective Comparative Clinical Evaluation of 784 Consecutive Cases of Breast Augmentation and Vertical Mammaplasty, Performed Individually and in Combination (Free from June 28- August 1)

    Read, share and discuss these hot articles through the month of July and beyond, courtesy of PRS. Your thoughts, opinions and ideas are very important to the on-going conversation.

    In addition to reading the articles for free above, you can also watch the free video discussion:

    Jonathan Cheng, MD, discusses the July Hand article "A Systematic Review of the Literature on the Outcomes of Treatment for Recurrent and Persistent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome" by Soltani et al.
  38. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi guys Donnell from PRS again and I'm back to present our newest addition to the PRS Resident Chronicles. Read Jordan Ireton's take on the being a plastic surgeon and pick up some advice that may save you an explanation.

  39. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi Everyone,

    Aaron with PRS and PRS Go here, happy to announce that ASPS is now accepting entries for the 3rd annual Residents Bowl at PS 2013.

    Hosts: Chad Tattini, MD and former Jeopardy! Champion Hatem Abou-Sayed, MD

    Winning isn't everything, but we are keeping score. Saturday and Sunday, teams of four compete to answer questions on case studies covering the core curriculum of plastic surgery.

    A great review and fun, too. Individual and group registrations accepted. Build your teams now. Can you unseat 2012 champions from UTSW?

    Winners get eternal-glory, bragging rights and 4 iPad minis from PRS GO!

    PRS is putting the GO in San DieGO!
  40. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi guys Donnell from PRS again. Blogger Jordan Ireton revisits her first two weeks of residency and stresses the importance of teamwork. How was your first day as a resident? Read, comment and stay tuned for more free content from PRS.

  41. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi Everyone, the August issue of PRS is here, and there are a bunch of great articles and videos that you can access on PRSJournal.com for free.

    Check them out here:

    •Evidence-Based Value of Subcutaneous Surgical Wound Drainage: The Largest Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    •Effectiveness and Safety of Independent Pediatric Nurse Practitioners in Evaluating Plagiocephaly
    •Outcomes Analysis of Patients Undergoing Autoaugmentation after Breast Implant Removal
    •Analysis of Satisfaction and Well-Being following Breast Reduction Using a Validated Survey Instrument: The BREAST-Q
    •A Nationwide Analysis of the Relationship between Hospital Volume and Outcome for Autologous Breast Reconstruction (Free From July 30 - August 15)
    •Prevalence of Dupuytren Disease in The Netherlands (Free From August 16 -31)
    •Subglandular Breast Augmentation with Textured, Anatomic, Cohesive Silicone Implants: A Review of 440 Consecutive Patients (Free From July 30 - August 31)

    Plus: David A. Hidalgo, MD, discusses the August Cosmetic article "Subglandular Breast Augmentation with Textured, Anatomic, Cohesive Silicone Implants: A Review of 440 Consecutive Patients" by Lista et al. Watch the video!

    And, if you're thinking more abstractly these days, help yourself to TWO Abstract Supplements, entirely for free:

    •2013 European PSRC Abstract Supplement
    •2013 PSRC Abstract Supplement


    If there's an article that most of you are interested in that's not free, hit up me or Donnell on this forum and we'll see what we can do!

    Happy reading!

    Aaron with PRS
  42. Converted

    Converted

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    Get off your high horse Mister. We are all nerds here. Just because plastics is a competitive specialty doesn't mean you are entitled to be an *ss about it. For a competitive specialty that has the luxury of recruiting gifted people, you should be interested in hiring those that are focused on promoting the science of your field rather than focusing on the irrelevant BS that you mentioned in your list.

    Mentality like this is the very reason I am not applying to plastics, even though I am a highly competitive candidate in every way.
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2013
  43. maxheadroom

    maxheadroom Rhinestone Cowboy Moderator

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    I'm not sure what offended you about my post. My point is that we want people in our specialty who have done things besides just focusing on grades and research. Yes, Integrated Plastics has the great luxury of picking from super-high achievers. Why do we like people who have demonstrated excellence in other areas of their life (sports/music/art)? They've demonstrated an ability to focus on a very specific talent and develop it. That's more or less the same as residency. If they've already proven an ability to develop other talents that way, why wouldn't we be interested in their ability to do it as a Plastics resident? My advice was to a pre-med who needed to get the message that there are lots of things that make a good applicant to my program. When we convene our rank meeting, we spend a lot of time talking about which students were interesting/seemed fun/had unique experiences/would be enjoyable to train for six years. If you make it to the interview, you've more or less demonstrated that you're a smart, hard-working, driven student. If you want to make yourself stand out, work on some other parts of yourself besides just being AOA/Step 1 > 235 with research.

    I'm sorry that you've had a bad experience with Plastics. In general, I think that we tend to be fun people who do cool cases (of course, I'm a bit biased).
  44. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Administrator SDN Senior Moderator Lifetime Donor

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    Not that maxheadroom needs my help, but I'm stymied by your response as well.

    The fact of the matter is that all competitive program applicants have good grades, research and LORs. What sets PRS and other competitive specialties apart, IMHO, is that those who match are often pretty interesting people outside of the OR and office and are still able to advance the science and practice of their field.

    I might be biased here too but maxheadroom is far from a condescending jerk IRL or on-line: he's an erudite, compassionate, friendly, respected man with a very wide range of interests and skills outside of the OR. He's pretty easy on the eyes as well. ;)
  45. maxheadroom

    maxheadroom Rhinestone Cowboy Moderator

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    Aw, shucks. Now you made me blush.
  46. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Administrator SDN Senior Moderator Lifetime Donor

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    Physician Faculty hSDN Member SDN 10+ Year Member
    :p
  47. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi everyone,

    This is Aaron with PRS again. It's great to see a lively dialogue going back and forth on this forum. Some very interesting thoughts brought up.

    To add to the fray, I point to the newest post from one of our Resident Bloggers, Anup Patel from Yale:

    A Political Decision for All of Us to Make.

    Once you get into a PRS residency program - whether you're a self-confessed nerd, a musician, a mountain climber, or all of the above - what involvement can you (and should you) have in the world of plastic surgery politics?
  48. PRSJournal

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  49. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi SDN! Aaron Weinstein, Managing Editor of PRS, here with a few articles that I think you'll find really applicable to you...as they're kind of about you!

    First, in PRS this month, we had an article called "Fixing the Match: A Survey of Resident Behaviors" by Read the full study here free, on me.

    Secondly, check out "Generation Y and the Integrated Plastic Surgery Residency Match: A Cross-sectional Study of the 2011 Match Outcomes " by Gloria R Sue and Deepak Narayan. Read this PRS GO article here.

    What do you think about these two articles? Do they accurately reflect your experience so far?
  50. PRSJournal

    PRSJournal SDN Partner Partner Organization

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    Hi guys Donnell from PRS again. Check out the newest blog from the PRS Resident Chronicles and stay tuned for more free content. Let us know what we can do better to help residents and improve PRS.

    Research fellowships along the path to residency: time wasted or time well spent?

    By Andre Alcon

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