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PM&R books - which ones should I buy?

Discussion in 'PM&R' started by axm397, 09.02.05.

  1. axm397

    axm397 SDN Moderator Moderator SDN Advisor

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    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    Here's the consolidated thread: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=217096

    And here's the summary as of September 2005:

    I consolidated threads on PM&R books posted in the past 2 years.

    As a summary here's a list of books mentioned by or recommended by sdn users in alphabetical order. I bolded the books mentioned by more than 4 sdners.

    1. Anatomic Guide for the Electromyographer: the Limbs & Trunk, by A. Perotto – Paz5559
    2. Baby Braddom - Staydin
    3. Braddom – Stinky Tofu
    4. Clinical Orthopedic Rehabilitation by S. Brent Brotzman and Kevin E. Wilk (reader friendly) – bbbmd
    5. Cuccurullo board review
    6. Delisa – finally M3
    7. Dr. Tan's Practical Manual of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Diagnostics, Therapeutics, and Basic Problems - Da’ Physiatrist, PM&Radam
    8. Easy EMG-by Lyn Weiss/Julie Silver – Pain Specialist
    9. Electrodiagnosis in Diseases of Nerve and Muscle: Priciples and Practice, by J. Kimura – Paz5559
    10. Electrodiagnostic Medicine by Dumitru et al. (also on CD) – drvlad2004, Staydin
    11. Electromyography and Neuromuscular disorders by Preston/Shapiro – Pain Specialist, PM&Radam
    12. EMG Basics by Steve Gnatz - Staydin
    13. EMG in Clinical Practice: A Case Study Approach, by Katirji – Paz5559
    14. EMG Secrets – Digable Cat
    15. Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care- Walter B., Md. Greene – bbbmd
    16. Essentials of PMR by Jackson – Styadin, PM&Radam
    17. Handbook of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation by Susan Garrison – drvlad2004
    18. Hoppenfeld's Examination of the Spine and Extremities - Stinky Tofu, Wcrisp, Digable Cat, Da’ Physiatrist, Staydin, bbbmd
    19. Hoppenfelds Orthopaedic Neurology: A Diagnostic Guide to Neurologic Levels – Digable Cat
    20. Lennard's Pain Procedures for Clinical Practice - Stinky Tofu
    21. Magee's Orthopedic Physical Assessment - Stinky Tofu, bbbmd, finally M3
    22. Manual of PM&R by Christopher Brammer/M. Catherine Spires - electra
    23. Netter's Atlas of Orthopaedic Anatomy (about as big as Secrets, combination of Netter plates and the Ciba atlas collection) – Wcrisp, Digable Cat
    24. Ortho version of Tarascon Pocket copoeia – Staydin
    25. PASSOR Musculoskeletal Physical Examination Competencies List - http://www.aapmr.org/passor/education/msklists.htm - bbbmd
    26. PM&R Pocketpedia by Howard Choi – da’ physiatrist, Digable Cat, Staydin, caedmon, macman
    27. PM&R Secrets – Naraku, drvlad2004, Da’ Physiatrist, PM&Radam,
    28. The Low Back Pain Handbook, by Andrew J. J. Cole, and Stanley A. Herring – Digable Cat
    29. The Rehabilitation of People With Spinal Cord Injury by Nesaturai – caedmon, macman
    30. The Rehabilitation of People with Traumatic Brain Injury by Woo and Nesathurai – caedmon, macman
    31. The Savarese OMT review and DiGiaviaoni texts – Staydin
  2. Dr. Ice

    Dr. Ice Attending

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    I would like to add this one if I may...

    Daniels and Worthington's Muscle Testing: Techniques of Manual Examination





  3. mohanl

    mohanl Junior Member

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    Hi friends .I am starting residency at Miami univ.I have an option of having one book free from a med. rep.I am wondering which one will be more useful.
    1.Hand Book of Physical med. and rehab.medicine Basics Susan J Garrison MD

    2.Treatment and Rehabilitation of Fractures Softbound
  4. rehab_sports_dr

    rehab_sports_dr Member

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    IMO, I would take the Garrison book. No brainer.


    1.Hand Book of Physical med. and rehab.medicine Basics Susan J Garrison MD

    2.Treatment and Rehabilitation of Fractures Softbound[/QUOTE]
  5. mohanl

    mohanl Junior Member

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    [/QUOTE]
    thanks
  6. joseppi

    joseppi Member

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    anyone have input on "trauma rehab" by robinson. written by U. Washiston - it coivers acute management needs, SCI,TBI, burns etc....
  7. shah423

    shah423 New Member

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    As a fourth year medical student doing 3 physical medicine and rehab electives at various programs in the coming months, I was wondering what books you reccommend that we buy as a medical students...ie: what would be a good basic text book that is comprehensive and covers a broad range of rehab topics that are important for the medical student doing a rotation.

    Also, which of the rehab coat pocket books would you reccommend for medical students doing a rotation that may need a reference while on the wards. Thanks for the help!
  8. drusso

    drusso Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor

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    PM&R Secrets and PM&R Pocketpedia. Both on Amazon.Com
  9. caedmon

    caedmon Member

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    Just wanted to mention a couple of books I picked up this year:

    Hoppenfeld- Orthopaedic Neurology: A Diagnostic Guide to Neurologic Levels: Good review of exam technique for evaluation of neurolgic levels, good diagrams of individual muscles tested.

    Aids to the Examination of the Peripheral Nervous System: A great guide for improving your neurologic exam.

    Orhopaedic Physical Therapy Secrets: Besides coverning basic anatomy, physiology, pathology etc., gives some insight into PT Rx's and decent biomechanical evaluation.
  10. drvlad2004

    drvlad2004 Senior Member

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    Are there any good books that any of you would recommend for orthotics and prosthetics, especially books that include nice photographs?
  11. joseppi

    joseppi Member

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    I know what you saying, with O&P you MUST have pictures to make sense of it. Some fellow residents I know use the "Tan" pocket book for this, it not only has a descent O&P section but the basics for other PMR stuff is also included. Probably overkill for a "pocket book" as its actually pretty thick and usless you are walking around with a huge white coat...
    I wish there was one consolidated resource for O&P that was standard with a with the pertinent info of adjusting, when to use what etc...

    Some programs have provided handbooks designed for the resident by prostheticians/ortho/PMR... great idea!

    Have you seen that many of the PMR programs provide book money??? Not the case in my experience, from what I have seen.
  12. fink dog

    fink dog

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    :)

    The clear and above favorite PM&R Review Book is "PM&R Secrets by O'Young, Young and Stiens".

    This book is used internationally by residents in over 30 countries.

    It is now in it's THIRD EDITION.

    Within the USA it is the BEST book for passing the BOARDS and for a concise, "to the point" authoritative overview of the field.

    Residents as well as attendings use this book as an every day reference.

    It is written in a simple, question and answer format which engages the reader
  13. rehab_sports_dr

    rehab_sports_dr Member

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    While PM+R Secrets is a fine book (my copy is certainly dog-eared), the comment below reads like an ad from someone with a financial interest.

    For passing the boards, Cuccarillo is clearly the best book on the market, by an enormous margin.


  14. MikeShanahan

    MikeShanahan

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    I'm just a med student and haven't ventured into getting stuff like Cuccarello and Delisa/Braddom, but as far as something on my level and managable for a few PM&R rotations my favorite book was Manual of PM&R by Christopher Brammer (people at U Mich wrote it). To compare, I would say it's sorta like BRS Pathology - similar size, written in outline format.

    It's popular and pretty thorough, but I'm not a big fan of PM&R secrets - I thought it would be like Surgical Recall (which I thought was really good because quizzing yourself is a great way to learn), but in many instances it was too hard to quiz myself because the answer would be a few big long paragraphs. I prefer logic, order, structure, etc over paragraph reading.

    The Tan book is bigger and probably has more stuff in it than Brammer but I noticed that it doesn't have chapters devoted to PM&R diagnosis - i.e. stroke, TBI, MS. Instead it has chapters devoted to common problems - i.e. spasticity, bladder, pressure ulcers. Brammer has a chapter for these problems as well as a chapters on stroke, TBI, etc, and summarizes the complications related to each. Feels like a more natural way to learn PM&R.
  15. dc2md

    dc2md

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  16. fozzy40

    fozzy40 Senior Member

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    Which Netter's Atlas of Orthopaedics is better your opinion: the concise or full version?
  17. rehab_sports_dr

    rehab_sports_dr Member

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    IMO, I wouldn't get either one. They are ok, but you can do better. For a physiatrist, the following books will much better fit your anatomy needs:



    As a primary atlas, I feel strongly that Clemente is the best anatomy atlas. It has better pictures than Netter, but even more importantly it has the text to support the images, and muscle and nerve tables built into the atlas

    As a primary anatomy text, I think the full version of Moore's is the most clinically relevant and up to date. Don't waste your time with something like the Hollinshead spine and limb text, which doesn't have as many clinical pearls, and doesn't have anywhere near the depth of Moores

    If you are at all interested in Spine medicine, then I cannot strongly enough recommend Nikolai Bogduk's text on Lumbosacral spine anatomy

    And if you are considering a career in interventional spine, then you absolutely need to buy the ISIS guidlines from the ISIS website. They are the closest thing interventional spine has to a bible, and the flouro anatomy pictures are outstanding.
  18. dc2md

    dc2md

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    any good netter-quality pocket anatomy guide (of course with innervation, etc.). good spatial relationship for understanding nerve entrapment areas and EMG studies. just something for quick reference.
  19. fozzy40

    fozzy40 Senior Member

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    I have Moore as a primary text. I just want an ortho pathology book with illustrations...
  20. OMMFellow06

    OMMFellow06 PM&R Resident

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    Hey,
    I have about $400 left on my internship stipend to buy books and I've looked at the list of books to get and I'm still not sure.
    The books that I already have are
    1. Choi pocketpedia
    2. PM&R secrets
    3. Physical exam of spine and extremities by Hoppenfeld
    4. Easy EMG by Weiss

    Should I spend that money on getting one of the major textbooks, or should I get multiple smaller books instead? I don't want the stipend to go to waste.

    Ripal
  21. axm397

    axm397 SDN Moderator Moderator SDN Advisor

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    some of it depends on your residency curriculum and what you are interested in - although you can't go wrong with a braddom or a delisa...

    Magee is a good one too
  22. Disciple

    Disciple Senior Member

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    Ditto on the ISIS Guidelines. The only negative is that it's a little bit limited.
    I would also highly recommend Fenton.


    Slipman's book "Interventional Spine" is coming out next month. Could be the new gold standard.
  23. Llenroc

    Llenroc Bandidos Motorcycle Club

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    Is there really a lot of anatomy in PM&R? That really wasn't my strong suit during med 1. :scared: Although I can tolerate some muscle and bone stuff, but most other anatomy makes me :sleep:

    Do they do a lot of malicious anatomy pimping on PM&R like in Surgery?
  24. Jumpu

    Jumpu Tiger Mom/Physiatrist

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    Yes, yes they do.
    Just kidding.
    I have found PM&R residents and attendings to be a very cool group of people. The multidisciplinary nature of the field requires collaboration and cooperation among all. :)
  25. drvlad2004

    drvlad2004 Senior Member

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    Get Braddom or DeLisa. I have both. Definitely get Cuccurulo. I read that book 2 times over while studying for this year's SAE, which I am nervous to get my score back. However, Cuccurulo's book was excellent for use in studying for the exam. I personally like Magee's Orthopedic physical assessment over Hoppenfeld. I would wait to get an EMG textbook during your PGY3 or 4 year. Dr. Weiss' book is excellent when first learning the basics of EMG. Then the more complex textbooks, such as Dumitru and Preston, are great to add onto your library.
  26. OMMFellow06

    OMMFellow06 PM&R Resident

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    Which one should I get, Braddom or DeLisa? I have heard great things about Cuccurullo's book so I'll definitely get that. I think that Magee would put me over the $400 mark if I get the other 2.
    I actually got the Weiss book as a student while rotating at NUMC cuz I figured if I'm gonna work with Dr. Weiss herself, I wanted to know at least a little about EMGs.
    Thanks for the help.
  27. rehab_sports_dr

    rehab_sports_dr Member

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    I would recommend Braddom over Delisa. Both are good books, and Delisa might even be a bit more detailed. But in the Braddom text, Braddom himself edits each chapter to help improve its readability, which I think helps
  28. Louisville04

    Louisville04 Junior Member

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    I heard Braddom is an easier read....but many of the authors of Delisa are more involved in writing/developing the board exams (I got the Braddom and went to the Kessler Review...and used Cuccurullo)
  29. mehul_25

    mehul_25 Dude!!!

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  30. drvlad2004

    drvlad2004 Senior Member

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    Braddom is an easier read. You could buy smaller books like Brammer's Manual of PM&R with the rest of the money as well as a musculoskeletal injection skills book.
  31. mehul_25

    mehul_25 Dude!!!

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  32. espfactor

    espfactor Guest

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    I went to the ISIS website

    http://www.spineuniverse.com/displayarticle.php/article3127.html

    but where is the link to purchase the guidelines?
  33. mehul_25

    mehul_25 Dude!!!

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  34. ShrikeMD

    ShrikeMD

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    If you must spend money on textbooks, buy the texts (braddom, delisa, etc.) as used books and save. After a few years (sometimes by the time they are printed), individual chapters may become outdated. In some texts, the chapters are inadequately revised between editions. The soft-cover reviews tend to be a better investment if you are a resident who has board examinations weighing on your mind. Atlases are never outdated, so they also tend to be a worthwhile investment. Buying atlases as used versions provides extra value for the dollar invested.

    Residents should remember that your institutional library discounts should provide discounts for online article access. Current review articles in reputable journals are generally superior to book chapters in textbooks (unless you are looking for a paperweight or a bookend). Journal review articles cost less, and are easier to search than a book chapter in a text.

    As an attending, you have greater flexibility with your investing $$$. I would consider purchasing texts in related fields (e.g. orthopedic or neuroradiology), buying these used if you can. In my own field of specialization, I rarely spend $$$ on texts, and keep current with journal articles, supplemented with reviews in related fields. This costs far less money, and provides information that is more current.

    Finally, agreeing to serve as a book reviewer for a medical journal usually has the benefit of allowing you to keep the book after the review. The downside is when you are asked to review a bad book. In this instance, you are stuck with the odious task of critically reading a bad book, and then you have a book you don't want. (Consider selling it online.)
  35. picolo

    picolo Junior Member

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    hi everyone,
    I want to buy the baby braddom , but I heard that the new edition will be published , has anyone heard about that ? when? and anyone has the old one and wants to get rid of it ?
  36. MikeShanahan

    MikeShanahan

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    There's a couple books that I thought someone out there must've checked this out, that I was hoping to hear about:

    Gerard Malanga, who I think is at Kessler has a book called Musculoskeletal Physical Exam: Evidence Based Approach.

    http://www.amazon.com/Musculoskelet...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1205280029&sr=1-1

    Anyone ever use this? I've never seen it but am considering buying it just from description. Seems like a great premise - you don't just want to know how to do each part of a physical exam, but also the value of (+) and (-) findings.

    Another book by a name in PM&R that I thought someone would mention is Practical Electromyography by Ernest Johnson at OSU. There are probably a dozen different EMG books on this post, but I guess not many people use this one?
  37. GQPMR

    GQPMR Fellow SDN Advisor

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    The Malanga book is really good reference and even comes with a DVD that you can use to either learn examination maneuvers or include the videos into powerpoint presentations when teaching others.
  38. GQPMR

    GQPMR Fellow SDN Advisor

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    Based on the original list done by axm397, my recommendations for basic references are in bolded text:

    1. Anatomic Guide for the Electromyographer: the Limbs & Trunk, by A. Perotto
    2. Baby Braddom
    3. Braddom
    4. Clinical Orthopedic Rehabilitation by S. Brent Brotzman and Kevin E. Wilk (reader friendly)
    5. Cuccurullo board review
    6. Delisa

    7. Dr. Tan's Practical Manual of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Diagnostics, Therapeutics, and Basic Problems
    8. Easy EMG-by Lyn Weiss/Julie Silver
    9. Electrodiagnosis in Diseases of Nerve and Muscle: Priciples and Practice, by J. Kimura
    10. Electrodiagnostic Medicine by Dumitru et al. (also on CD)
    11. Electromyography and Neuromuscular disorders by Preston/Shapiro
    12. EMG Basics by Steve Gnatz
    13. EMG in Clinical Practice: A Case Study Approach, by Katirji
    14. EMG Secrets
    15. Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care- Walter B., Md. Greene
    16. Essentials of PMR by Jackson
    17. Handbook of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation by Susan Garrison
    18. Hoppenfeld's Examination of the Spine and Extremities
    19. Hoppenfelds Orthopaedic Neurology: A Diagnostic Guide to Neurologic Levels – Digable Cat
    20. Lennard's Pain Procedures for Clinical Practice
    21. Magee's Orthopedic Physical Assessment
    22. Manual of PM&R by Christopher Brammer/M. Catherine Spires
    23. Netter's Atlas of Orthopaedic Anatomy (about as big as Secrets, combination of Netter plates and the Ciba atlas collection)
    24. Ortho version of Tarascon Pocket copoeia
    25. PASSOR Musculoskeletal Physical Examination Competencies List - http://www.aapmr.org/passor/education/msklists.htm
    26. PM&R Pocketpedia by Howard Choi

    27. PM&R Secrets
    28. The Low Back Pain Handbook, by Andrew J. J. Cole, and Stanley A. Herring
    29. The Rehabilitation of People With Spinal Cord Injury by Nesaturai – caedmon, macman
    30. The Rehabilitation of People with Traumatic Brain Injury by Woo and Nesathurai

    31. The Savarese OMT review and DiGiaviaoni texts
  39. njdevil

    njdevil

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    Gerard Malanga is now in private practice with faculty appointment at UMDNJ-NJ Med. I too advocate his and Scott Nadler's book. Dr Nadler is no longer with us.

    Another book that is not commonly known about but has many good physiatric authors is:

    Minimally Invasive Musculoskeletal Pain Medicine (Minimally Invasive Procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery) by Mitchell K. Freedman, DO

    Chapters by Len Kamen (Moss Rehab), Guy Fried (Magee Rehab), Curtis Slipman (UPenn), Ira Cornbluth, Jeremy Simon (Rothman Institute-Jefferson), Michael Depalma (MCV), E. Anthony Overton (formerly Rothman Institure), Kenneth Botwin (Florida Spine Institute), Ted Conliffe (Rothman Institute-Jefferson), Zach Broyer (Rothman Institute-Jefferson), Maddy Dholakia (Rothman Institute-Jefferson, Mendal Kupfer (Magee Rehab), and Adam Schreiber (Jefferson).

    http://www.amazon.com/Minimally-Inv...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1205345383&sr=8-1
  40. urheald

    urheald Spreading Hope!

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    Which book would be considered the bible for PM&R referrence?

    Harrison's to Internal Medicine
    Schwartz to Surgery
    Campbells or Urology
    William's to OB/GYN
    Bates to Physical Exam
    Swanson's to Family Medicine Review
    Nelson's of Pediatrics.

    That is the book I am looking for with PM&R.

    Thanks
  41. Shalom77

    Shalom77

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    Either Braddom or Delisa depending on stylistic preference.

    Like Medicine has Cecil's (my preference) as well as Harrison
    or Surgery: Greenfield and Sabiston as well as Schwartz.
  42. njdevil

    njdevil

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    Randy Braddom's Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, although some would argue Joel DeLisa's text. I suppose is akin to Harrison's or Cecil's.
  43. urheald

    urheald Spreading Hope!

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    Thank you Shalom and Devil. I have a ton of books in my cart on Amazon but I did not want to get more than one reference.
  44. Shalom77

    Shalom77

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    I actually bought Braddom in large part because of the reviews on Amazon - but then I later discovered my school library has the latest edition of DeLisa. I checked it out and I think I actually like DeLisa a little better. (I wonder, is DeLisa more like Cecil and Braddom more like Harrison? :p FWIW I also prefer Greenfield to Schwartz ;) ) Given my experience, I think it's worth sitting down with both books and reading a bit before to see which you prefer before shelling out money.

    Actually it's worth checking into your school's library before shelling out any money - I discovered a wealth of un-checked out PM&R books. Not to mention - what they don't have they will get for me through interlibrary loan. :) Even if you decide you want to own one of these later - it really shows you which books you actually read and which ones serve as fine door stoppers. :p
  45. Nico47

    Nico47 New Member

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    Resident [Any Field]
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Hi all,

    I've got my senior stipend burning a hole in my virtual wallet. I'd like to pick up some books that will help me with my upcoming job, which will be half EMGs and half MSK/Spine. Any suggestions? I have about $500 to spend, already own Preston & Shapiro and Dr. Gnatz's EMG book.

    I'm especially interested in MSK imaging, so I'd like a book aimed at getting more comfortable knowing when, what type, and how to interpret MRIs, in addition to ultrasound. I'd also like to know what people think is a good reference for peripheral joint injections.

    Any help you can lend will be greatly appreciated. Only three more months until I graduate, yikes!
  46. PMR 4 MSK

    PMR 4 MSK Large Member SDN Advisor

    Joined:
    10.01.07
    Messages:
    4,185
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    SDN 5+ Year Member

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