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Questions and Answers about Podiatric Medical Schools

Discussion in 'Pre-Podiatry Students' started by jonwill, 06.12.07.

  1. jonwill

    jonwill SDN Senior Moderator Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    09.21.05
    Messages:
    2,679
    Location:
    Southwest
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Podiatrist SDN 7+ Year Member

    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    We need volunteers!!
    We would like one or more people from each podiatric medical school to take a few moments and answer as many of these questions as they can. When we all do this, we will have a tremendous resource for every student applying or thinking of applying to podiatric medical schools.

    This is how this will work:

    1. Examine the thread to see if your school has been added. If not, feel free to make the first post of questions. You can cut and paste the questions from the third post in this thread. Please do not feel obligated to answer all of them (unless you want.) There are many students from each school, and someone else will be happy to fill in what you don't.

    2. If your school is already listed, please complete whatever questions have not been answered by other students.

    3. If you want to send answers anonymously, please email them to 31questions@studentdoctor.net instead of posting them on the forum. Put "Podiatry" in the subject line of your email. They will be posted for you.


    Now let's see that school pride and help out the SDN members who are thinking of applying!


    Is there a downloadable copy of the 31 Questions?
    Sure. It is attached.

    Attached Files:

  2. jonwill

    jonwill SDN Senior Moderator Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    09.21.05
    Messages:
    2,679
    Location:
    Southwest
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Podiatrist SDN 7+ Year Member
    Table of Contents
    California College of Podiatric Medicine at Samuel Merritt College
    College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery, Des Moines University
    New York College of Podiatric Medicine
    Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine
    Temple Unversity School of Podiatric Medicine
    Dr William M Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine, Rosalind Franklin University
    Barry University Podiatric Medicine Program
    Arizona Podiatric Medicine Program, Midwestern University


    Standard Disclaimer
    Remember, everything posted on any SDN forum, once posted becomes permanently available to the general public. Members are encouraged to avoid posting anything that they would not want to be associated with publicly. Use caution in sharing identifiable information or overly personal details.

    Mentors and students posting in this thread are individual volunteers. Advice given by mentors and/or students does not necessarily represent the views or opinions of the Student Doctor Network or CRG. The mentor forum should not be used as your only source of advice when making career or academic decisions.
  3. jonwill

    jonwill SDN Senior Moderator Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    09.21.05
    Messages:
    2,679
    Location:
    Southwest
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Podiatrist SDN 7+ Year Member
    Curriculum
    1. Are there any special programs for which this podiatric medical school is noted?
    2. Describe this school's curriculum in the pre-clinical and clinical years. Are there any innovations, like Problem-Based Learning?
    3. Are there opportunities for students to design, conduct, and publish their own research?
    4. Is there a note-taking service? If so, is it university-run or student-run?
    5. Is there flexibility in the coursework (the number of electives) and the timing of the courses (accelerating, decelerating, and time off) during the pre-clinical and clinical years?
    6. Has this podiatric medical school, or any of its clinical departments, been on probation or had its accreditation revoked?
    7. How do students from this podiatric medical school perform on the National Board Examinations? How does the school assist students who do not pass?

    Evaluations
    8. How are students evaluated academically? How are clinical evaluations performed?
    9. Is there a formal mechanism in place for students to evaluate their professors and attending physicians? What changes have been made recently as a result of this feedback?

    Counseling/Student Support
    10. What kind of academic, personal, financial, and career counseling is available to students? Are these services also offered to their spouses and dependents/children?
    11. Is there a mentor/advisor system? Who are the advisors—faculty members, other students, or both?
    12. How diverse is the student body? Are there support services or organizations for ethnic minorities and women?

    Facilities
    13. Tell me about the library and extracurricular facilities (i.e., housing and athletic/recreational facilities).
    14. Are there computer facilities available to students? Are they integrated into the curriculum/learning?
    15. What type of clinical sites—ambulatory, private preceptors, private hospitals, rural settings—are available or required for clerkships? Does this school allow for students to do rotations at other institutions or internationally?
    16. Is a car necessary for clinical rotations? Is parking a problem?

    Financial Aid
    17. What is the current tuition and fees? Is this expected to increase yearly? If so, at what rate?
    18. Are there stable levels of federal financial aid and substantial amounts of university/endowment aid available to students?
    19. Are there students who have an "unmet need" factor in their budget? If so, where do these students come up with the extra funds?
    20. Are spouses and dependents/children covered in a student's budget?
    21. Is someone available to assist students with budgeting and financial planning?
    22. Does this school provide guidance to its students, and to its graduates/alumni, on debt management?

    Student Involvement
    23. What school committees (e.g., curriculum committee) have student representation?
    24. Are students involved in (required or voluntary) community service?
    25. How active is the Student Council/Government? Are there other student organizations?

    Policies
    26. Is there an established protocol for dealing with student exposure to infectious diseases? Is disability insurance provided to cover this exposure?
    27. Does this school provide, or does the student pay for, vaccinations against Hepatitis B or prophylactic AZT treatment in case of a needle-stick or accident?
    28. Is there a school Honor Code? Is there a grievance process/procedure? Are the students involved?

    Residency
    29. May I see a list of residency programs to which this school's recent graduates were accepted?

    Questions to Ask Yourself
    30. Does this school have strengths in the type of podiatric medicine (primary care versus surgery versus biomechanics versus sports medicine) that I will want to practice?
    31. Would I be happy at this school (for at least the next four years)?
  4. jonwill

    jonwill SDN Senior Moderator Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    09.21.05
    Messages:
    2,679
    Location:
    Southwest
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Podiatrist SDN 7+ Year Member
    Curriculum
    1. Are there any special programs for which this podiatric medical school is noted?
    - 1st year is completely integrated with DO program, 2nd year is partially integrated. The entire 4th year is spent doing clerkships away from the University. The school is completely wireless and laptops/handhelds are provided. All logs are electronic.

    2. Describe this school's curriculum in the pre-clinical and clinical years. Are there any innovations, like Problem-Based Learning?
    - 1st - basic sciences, 2nd - systems, lower limb anatomy, pod classes, 3rd - clinic, a few pod based classes, and problem-based learning, 4th - clerkships

    3. Are there opportunities for students to design, conduct, and publish their own research?
    - YES

    4. Is there a note-taking service? If so, is it university-run or student-run?

    - Note-pool is student run and completely electronic

    5. Is there flexibility in the coursework (the number of electives) and the timing of the courses (accelerating, decelerating, and time off) during the pre-clinical and clinical years?
    - No, everyone takes the required classes. There is a 5 year program for special cirumstances.

    6. Has this podiatric medical school, or any of its clinical departments, been on probation or had its accreditation revoked?
    -Never

    7. How do students from this podiatric medical school perform on the National Board Examinations? How does the school assist students who do not pass?
    - 1st time pass rate consistantly above 90% (97% last year).

    Evaluations

    8. How are students evaluated academically? How are clinical evaluations performed? - Academically: students must have 70% or above to pass, Clinically: evaluated on each clinical skill and must get atleast a 7 (on scale of 10).

    9. Is there a formal mechanism in place for students to evaluate their professors and attending physicians? What changes have been made recently as a result of this feedback?
    - Students are randomly selected to evaluate each course and those who want to can evaluate any course. Clinicians are evaluated as students rotate through. Courses are reformed yearly according to student input.

    Counseling/Student Support
    10. What kind of academic, personal, financial, and career counseling is available to students? Are these services also offered to their spouses and dependents/children?- All types of counseling are available at no charge through the school. The Spousal Support Association (SSA) is an organization completely run by those who have significant others in the programs at the medical school.

    11. Is there a mentor/advisor system? Who are the advisors—faculty members, other students, or both?
    -Big brother/sister program for 1st years, each student has a faculty advisor.

    12. How diverse is the student body? Are there support services or organizations for ethnic minorities and women?
    -As diverse as any place is in the midwest! There are support services and organizations for ethnic minorities and women.

    Facilities
    13. Tell me about the library and extracurricular facilities (i.e., housing and athletic/recreational facilities).
    -Probably the best facilities of all of the podiatry schools. Huge, new library with many study rooms and access to all medical media, collegiate size basketball court, large locker rooms, aerobics room, indoor track, free weights, machines, and treadmills, elipticals, etc with personal flatscreen TV's (cable).

    14. Are there computer facilities available to students? Are they integrated into the curriculum/learning?
    -Each student given laptop/handheld, wireless campus

    15. What type of clinical sites—ambulatory, private preceptors, private hospitals, rural settings—are available or required for clerkships? Does this school allow for students to do rotations at other institutions or internationally?
    - private practice, county and VA hospital rotation, rural hospital rotations available and required 3rd year. 4th year students are required to do a 4 month core (which incorporates 1 month IM), 1 month private practice, and the rest is COMPLETELY up to them.

    16. Is a car necessary for clinical rotations? Is parking a problem?
    - Car is necessary for 4th year, parking not a problem.

    Financial Aid
    17. What is the current tuition and fees? Is this expected to increase yearly? If so, at what rate?
    -Check website for this.

    18. Are there stable levels of federal financial aid and substantial amounts of university/endowment aid available to students?
    - Stafford loans used by students, many scholarships given throughout 4 years

    19. Are there students who have an "unmet need" factor in their budget? If so, where do these students come up with the extra funds?
    - Don't know

    20. Are spouses and dependents/children covered in a student's budget?
    - Not really but I have a wife and kids and made it work.

    21. Is someone available to assist students with budgeting and financial planning?
    - Yes

    22. Does this school provide guidance to its students, and to its graduates/alumni, on debt management?
    -Yes, they bring in tons of speakers about this and give students lunch to come and listen!

    Student Involvement
    23. What school committees (e.g., curriculum committee) have student representation?
    - Podiatry is represented on all counsels and committees by students.

    24. Are students involved in (required or voluntary) community service?
    - Voluntary. Last year, quite a few students did the national special olympics

    25. How active is the Student Council/Government? Are there other student organizations?
    - Very active student government. There are a lot of student clubs.

    Policies
    26. Is there an established protocol for dealing with student exposure to infectious diseases? Is disability insurance provided to cover this exposure?
    Yes, I think so. I had a few students in my group that cut or poked themselves and everything was taken care of.

    27. Does this school provide, or does the student pay for, vaccinations against Hepatitis B or prophylactic AZT treatment in case of a needle-stick or accident?
    - We must all be current on immunizations before starting school. I think they do cover prophylactic treatments because of an injury sustained in clinic.

    28. Is there a school Honor Code? Is there a grievance process/procedure? Are the students involved?
    - Honor codes are posted in every classroom and signed by the students in those classrooms. there is a grievance process that students are involved in.

    Residency
    29. May I see a list of residency programs to which this school's recent graduates were accepted?
    See next post

    Questions to Ask Yourself
    30. Does this school have strengths in the type of podiatric medicine (primary care versus surgery versus biomechanics versus sports medicine) that I will want to practice?
    - It did for me!

    31. Would I be happy at this school (for at least the next four years)?
    - I was!
  5. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest

    Joined:
    02.16.06
    Messages:
    2,716
    Location:
    Iowa
    Status:
    Podiatry Student
    Residency
    29. May I see a list of residency programs to which this school's recent graduates were accepted?


    • St. Josephs Healthcare - Clinton Township, Michigan (x2)
    • Inova Fairfax Hospital - Falls Church, Virginia (x2)
    • Grant Medical Center - Columbus, Ohio
    • University of Utah - Salt Lake City, Utah (x2)
    • St. Mary's Healthcare - Evansville, Indiana
    • Western Pennsylvania Hospital - Pittsburg, Pennsylvania (x3)
    • UPMC Southside - Pittsburg, Pennsylvania
    • Detroit Medical Center - Detroit, Michigan (x2)
    • DVA - Phoenix - Phoenix, Arizona
    • University of Florida - Jacksonville, Florida (x2)
    • West Houston Medical Center - Houston, Texas
    • Northern Colorado Medical Center - Greeley, Colorado
    • DVA-Southern Arizona - Tucson, Arizona
    • Forrest Park - St. Louis, Missouri
    • St. Lukes Hospital - Allentown, Pennsylvania
    • St. John North Shore - Harrison Township, Michigan
    • DVA - Puget Sound - Seattle, Washington
    • St. Joseph Reg Med Ctr - Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  6. Dr. Gangrene

    Dr. Gangrene AZPOD 2011 Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    08.04.06
    Messages:
    481
    Location:
    Valley of the Sun
    Status:
    Podiatry Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    1. Are there any special programs for which this podiatric medical school is noted?
    AZPOD at Midwestern is the newest kid on the block. There first class will graduate in 2008. There are not any "special" programs yet, but there is a dual degree option to receive the D.P.M. degree along with a M.H.P.E (masters of health professions education) degree. This is for those interested in academia, and its goal is to help the recepient "become an effective educator in their professional field".
    Also, classes are taken jointly w/ the D.O. students, something unique to only AZPOD and DMU at this time.

    2. Describe this school's curriculum in the pre-clinical and clinical years. Are there any innovations, like Problem-Based Learning?
    It is based on the 2+2 model, similar to that of DMU. The first 2 years are almost exclusively classroom, and all non-podiatry related classes are taken jointly w/ the D.O. students. Only DMU and AZPOD offer this. The classes are the "basic sciences" and are pretty much the same studied at M.D. and D.O. schools (i.e. Biochem, embryology, histology, gross anatomy, physiology, microbiology, Immunology, pharmacology etc.)

    The third year is where you begin to see patients, and classes are a lot lighter. At AZPOD, the classes are in the afternoon a couple days a week. Most of your time is spent seeing patients. Right now, as they get their program going, most clinical experiences are in the Phoenix area 3rd year.
    4th year allows for experiences at remote sites.
    During the 4th year, you are all clinical and the only "classroom work" occurs online.

    3. Are there opportunities for students to design, conduct, and publish their own research?

    4. Is there a note-taking service? If so, is it university-run or student-run?

    5. Is there flexibility in the coursework (the number of electives) and the timing of the courses (accelerating, decelerating, and time off) during the pre-clinical and clinical years?
    6. Has this podiatric medical school, or any of its clinical departments, been on probation or had its accreditation revoked?
    No. AZPOD has provisional accreditation at this time. This should not scare off prospective students; this is where any new program is before it graduates its' first class. The inaugural class had 100% pass rate on part I of their boards, the only school to do so that year. As soon as the class graduates in 2008, AZPOD should have full accreditation.

    7. How do students from this podiatric medical school perform on the National Board Examinations? How does the school assist students who do not pass?

    Evaluations
    8. How are students evaluated academically? How are clinical evaluations performed?
    9. Is there a formal mechanism in place for students to evaluate their professors and attending physicians? What changes have been made recently as a result of this feedback?

    Counseling/Student Support
    10. What kind of academic, personal, financial, and career counseling is available to students? Are these services also offered to their spouses and dependents/children?
    11. Is there a mentor/advisor system? Who are the advisors—faculty members, other students, or both?
    12. How diverse is the student body? Are there support services or organizations for ethnic minorities and women?

    Facilities
    13. Tell me about the library and extracurricular facilities (i.e., housing and athletic/recreational facilities).
    14. Are there computer facilities available to students? Are they integrated into the curriculum/learning?
    15. What type of clinical sites—ambulatory, private preceptors, private hospitals, rural settings—are available or required for clerkships? Does this school allow for students to do rotations at other institutions or internationally?
    16. Is a car necessary for clinical rotations? Is parking a problem?

    Financial Aid
    17. What is the current tuition and fees? Is this expected to increase yearly? If so, at what rate?
    18. Are there stable levels of federal financial aid and substantial amounts of university/endowment aid available to students?
    19. Are there students who have an "unmet need" factor in their budget? If so, where do these students come up with the extra funds?
    20. Are spouses and dependents/children covered in a student's budget?
    21. Is someone available to assist students with budgeting and financial planning?
    22. Does this school provide guidance to its students, and to its graduates/alumni, on debt management?

    Student Involvement
    23. What school committees (e.g., curriculum committee) have student representation?
    24. Are students involved in (required or voluntary) community service?
    25. How active is the Student Council/Government? Are there other student organizations?

    Policies
    26. Is there an established protocol for dealing with student exposure to infectious diseases? Is disability insurance provided to cover this exposure?
    27. Does this school provide, or does the student pay for, vaccinations against Hepatitis B or prophylactic AZT treatment in case of a needle-stick or accident?
    28. Is there a school Honor Code? Is there a grievance process/procedure? Are the students involved?

    Residency
    29. May I see a list of residency programs to which this school's recent graduates were accepted?

    Questions to Ask Yourself
    30. Does this school have strengths in the type of podiatric medicine (primary care versus surgery versus biomechanics versus sports medicine) that I will want to practice?
    31. Would I be happy at this school (for at least the next four years)?
  7. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    05.15.04
    Messages:
    2,170
    Location:
    California
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Curriculum
    1. Are there any special programs for which this podiatric medical school is noted?
    At the beginning of the third year about 15 students participate in the boot fitting of the freshman at WestPoint. Many students also volunteer in the medical tents at the many races in NYC including the NY marathon. The school has a sports medicine class and podopediatrics classes.
    2. Describe this school's curriculum in the pre-clinical and clinical years. Are there any innovations, like Problem-Based Learning?
    The first year is basic sciences the second year is clinical sciences. The third year is spent in the Foot Clinics of New York, the classroom, and Metropolitan, Harlem and Lincoln Hospitals. The fourth year consists of 4 externships, 2 months of senior surgery at the Foot Clinics of NY, and hospital rotations in Internal medicine, general surgery, ER, and podiatry clinic at the hospital.
    3. Are there opportunities for students to design, conduct, and publish their own research?
    If the students seek it out on there own and are self motivated.
    4. Is there a note-taking service? If so, is it university-run or student-run?
    Student run but not all classes choose to participate.
    5. Is there flexibility in the coursework (the number of electives) and the timing of the courses (accelerating, decelerating, and time off) during the pre-clinical and clinical years?
    The curriculum is set, there are no electives. There is a January class that starts in January with half the course load then continues for 4.5 years of school. There are also people who take 5-6 years due to issues with school work or family life. And pregnancy has caused a few students to take a decelerated track as well.
    6. Has this podiatric medical school, or any of its clinical departments, been on probation or had its accreditation revoked?
    Not that I am aware of.
    7. How do students from this podiatric medical school perform on the National Board Examinations? How does the school assist students who do not pass?
    The school is usually around the same as the national average. It varies from year to year and is more student dependent than school related (IMO). Students that do not pass can get tutors paid for by the school through work study. The school has board review courses online as well.

    Evaluations
    8. How are students evaluated academically?
    The grades are on a 4.0 scale with plusses and minuses. Below is copied from the student handbook the conversion of letters to percent.

    Grade Value Grade Points Comment
    AH 97-100 4.0 Honors. Also designated A+ in prior years.
    A 93-96 4.0
    A- 90-92 3.7
    B+ 87-89 3.3
    B 83-86 3.0
    B- 80-82 2.7
    C+ 77-79 2.3
    C 73-76 2.0
    C- 70-72 1.7 Minimum passing grade
    C-* 70 1.7 Maximum grade upon successfully completing a re-evaluation exam
    F less than 70 0.0 Failure

    How are clinical evaluations performed?
    Clinical evaluations are done on the CASPR forms based on all the clinicians views of the student. Some rotations have grades based on tests (oral and written) and others the grade is based solely on clinical patient interaction. In the 4th year depending on the rotation the student must read and figure out how they will be evaluated and be sure that it is completed before they finish the rotation or risk having to repeat the rotation.
    9. Is there a formal mechanism in place for students to evaluate their professors and attending physicians? What changes have been made recently as a result of this feedback?
    There is an online evaluation that is anonymous but somehow linked to your grades so if you do not complete it within a week after the course ending you get an incomplete that converts to a fail if you do not complete the eval within a month. Changes are made all the time based on this feedback. Sometimes the changes are good and sometimes they are not.

    Counseling/Student Support
    10. What kind of academic, personal, financial, and career counseling is available to students? Are these services also offered to their spouses and dependents/children?
    I have no idea.
    11. Is there a mentor/advisor system? Who are the advisors-faculty members, other students, or both?
    Each student gets a big brother or sister in the 2nd and 3rd year and a faculty advisor.
    12. How diverse is the student body? Are there support services or organizations for ethnic minorities and women?
    Very diverse. AAWP - American Association for Women Podiatrist student chapter is very active. SNPMA - Student National Podiatric Medical Association is available at the school as well for minorities.

    Facilities
    13. Tell me about the library and extracurricular facilities (i.e., housing and athletic/recreational facilities).
    The library is specific to podiatric medicine and the largest podiatric library in the US, so the school says. There are computers in the library and many study areas. All the texts that are needed for class are available on the shelves and on reserve in the library. The library subscribes to many journals, hard copies and online. They will order any article that you need for school that is not available online or in the library. The library hours are 7am - 10pm monday -Thursday, Friday til 4pm and the weekends less hours. The students get the library to stay open later during finals week and other stressful study times. There is a small gym open as long as the school is open.
    14. Are there computer facilities available to students? Are they integrated into the curriculum/learning?
    There are 2 computer labs besides the computers in the library. There are also 2 printers with free printing as long as it is school related. All the classes are video taped and put on an online learning system (blackboard, I think).
    15. What type of clinical sites-ambulatory, private preceptors, private hospitals, rural settings-are available or required for clerkships? Does this school allow for students to do rotations at other institutions or internationally?
    The main clinic is the Foot Clinics of NY. There are no private offices. The main hospitals are Metropolitan, Harlem and Lincoln Hospitals. The only elective months are the 4 externships for podiatric clerkships and if in the top 20% of the class on of the months for senior surgery may be spent at UMDNJ or West Penn as an extra clerkship.
    16. Is a car necessary for clinical rotations? Is parking a problem?
    A car is not necessary. There is parking but it is limited.

    Financial Aid
    17. What is the current tuition and fees? Is this expected to increase yearly? If so, at what rate?
    Tuition and fees add up to about 26,000. The increases are not set and happen from time to time depending on what the board of trustees allow.
    18. Are there stable levels of federal financial aid and substantial amounts of university/endowment aid available to students?
    Most students have ample access to federal aid and there are scholarships from 2nd - 4th years.
    19. Are there students who have an "unmet need" factor in their budget? If so, where do these students come up with the extra funds?
    Most students have an unmet need. They budget carefully and live on less than is expected, take out private loans, take out grad plus loans, rely on family.
    20. Are spouses and dependents/children covered in a student's budget?
    21. Is someone available to assist students with budgeting and financial planning?
    There is the office of financial aid that tells all the students at once that they need to be very careful with budgeting and their finances - that is the financial planning. Maybe if the students sought it out they would find it.
    22. Does this school provide guidance to its students, and to its graduates/alumni, on debt management?
    There is an exit interview for financial aid.

    Student Involvement
    23. What school committees (e.g., curriculum committee) have student representation?
    The student council president goes to each curriculum committee meeting.
    24. Are students involved in (required or voluntary) community service?
    Students are required to do 3 sports medicine events in the 3rd year. There are also many clubs that do volunteer activities such as diabetes expo, foot screenings for autistic children, foot screenings at the special Olympics, medical tent volunteers as races, marathons, tri-athalons.
    25. How active is the Student Council/Government? Are there other student organizations?
    Like any student body some people run to make a difference others to pad their resumes. As a whole the student council tries very hard to better the student body and the school. Every club is represented at NYCPM. Sports Medicine, Orthopedics, Wound Care, Diabetes, SNPMA, AAWP, ACFAS (surgery), Practice Management, APMSA...

    Policies
    26. Is there an established protocol for dealing with student exposure to infectious diseases? Yes Is disability insurance provided to cover this exposure?
    27. Does this school provide, or does the student pay for, vaccinations against Hepatitis B or prophylactic AZT treatment in case of a needle-stick or accident?
    28. Is there a school Honor Code? Is there a grievance process/procedure? Are the students involved?
    There is an honor code. There are procedures written in the student handbook. Students are involved, 2 per class are honor council reps.

    Residency
    29. May I see a list of residency programs to which this school's recent graduates were accepted? Yes

    Questions to Ask Yourself
    30. Does this school have strengths in the type of podiatric medicine (primary care versus surgery versus biomechanics versus sports medicine) that I will want to practice?
    This school's strengths are forefoot surgery, orthopedics and conservative care.
    31. Would I be happy at this school (for at least the next four years)?
  8. dpmgrad

    dpmgrad Senior Member

    Joined:
    05.17.05
    Messages:
    745
    Location:
    Philadelphia
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Podiatrist SDN 7+ Year Member
    I have been asked to help out with the mentor forum by answering some questions about TUSPM. Since I am an alumni of TUSPM, the answers below are based on what I had experienced at TUSPM when I was student. I graduated in 2002. Hopefully, some current TUSPM students may answer some of these questions.

    Curriculum
    1. Are there any special programs for which this podiatric medical school is noted?
    TUSPM offers several dual degree programs. DPM/MBA with Temple University Fox School of Business. DPM/MPH with Temple University. DPM/PhD in Biomedical Engineering with either University of Pennsylvania or Drexel University. TUSPM will be the second Podiatry school to have a Clinical Skills Lab where students can practice doing various clinical skills and surgical procedures. The first Clinical Skills Lab was created at NYCPM but I am not sure how NYCPM is utilizing the clinical skills lab.

    2. Describe this school's curriculum in the pre-clinical and clinical years. Are there any innovations, like Problem-Based Learning?
    Classes for the basic sciences are taken during the first two years. Basic Science classes are traditional lecture / lab style. Some courses will also be augmented with online computer learning. Majority of the basic science courses are taught by Temple University School of Medicine faculty and they use the similar course syllabus from the Medical and Dental school. Currently, TUSPM students do not sit in the same classroom as the MD or Dental students since TUSPM is located on a different campus than the Health Science campus. This may change in the near future as there are plans of relocating the Podiatry School up to the Health Science campus.

    Some of the clinical courses start in the first year and will be done by November of the third year. The curriculum is heavily slanted towards Podiatric Surgery. TUSPM students take the following clinical courses: Fundamentals of Podiatric Practice 1 and 2, Biomechanics and Orthopedics, Pathomechanics, Foot & Ankle Radiology, Casting, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitiation, Clinical Foot Orthopedics, Perioperative Protocol, Gerontology, Podiatric Surgical Principles, Digital & Metatarsal Surgery, First Ray Surgery, Reconstructive Surgery of the Foot and Leg, Traumatology, Cadaver Surgery Lab, Sports Medicine, Pediatric Foot and Ankle Orthopedics and Surgery, Dermatology, Internal Medicine, Community Health, Law & Podiatric Medicine, Podiatric Practice Management.

    Students will be exposed to patients starting in the first year where they have to go up to Temple University Hospital to practice doing Complete H&Ps. During the second year, students will begin to rotate through the TUSPM Foot and Ankle Institute to be exposed to patient. During the third year from June to November, students will have clinical rotations in the morning and classes in the afternoon. The clinical rotations include TUSPM Surgery Center, TUSPM Foot and Ankle Institute (Surgery clinic, Orthopedic clinic, Podiatric Medicine, Diagnosis clinic, Wound Care / Physical Medicine, Radiology, Satellite clinics), Family Medicine Clinics, Temple Childrens Hospital, Virtua West Jersey Hospital Podiatry clinic, DVA Philadelphia Podiatry clinic, and Anesthesia in local area hopsitals. Starting from the December of the third year through the fourth year, students will be completing 4 externships (clerkship), internal medicine, orthopedic surgery, infectious disease, neurology, office based clerkship, vascular surgery, and rotation through school's foot and ankle clinic (podiatric medicine module, podiatric orthopedics module, and podiatric surgery module). TUSPM student will have the opportunity to complete his / her third and fourth year clinical rotations at TUSPM or at one of the core rotation sites (University of Texas Health Science Center, Denver VAMC, St Francis in Hartford, CT, Botsford General Hospital, or Southern Arizona VA).

    3. Are there opportunities for students to design, conduct, and publish their own research?
    Students are required to take a research design course in the first year. There are plenty of research opportunities at TUSPM, especially in the TUSPM Gait Lab.

    4. Is there a note-taking service? If so, is it university-run or student-run?
    Yes, there is a note-taking service at TUSPM. It is student-run organization. Students may receive notes from the note-taking service for a fee, which is determined by note-taking service committee for each individual class (eg. class of 2007, 2008, etc...).

    5. Is there flexibility in the coursework (the number of electives) and the timing of the courses (accelerating, decelerating, and time off) during the pre-clinical and clinical years?
    Certain students may be eligible for the five year program at TUSPM where the course work during the first two years are spread out over a three year period.

    6. Has this podiatric medical school, or any of its clinical departments, been on probation or had its accreditation revoked?
    To my knowledge, TUSPM has never been on probation or had its accreditation revoked. However, Temple University School of Medicine had been put on probation in the past.

    7. How do students from this podiatric medical school perform on the National Board Examinations? How does the school assist students who do not pass?
    I do not know the current passing rates for the National Podiatry Board Examinations at TUSPM. When I was at TUSPM, the passing rate for the board exams were somwhere between 80 - 90%. I know that the current passing rate is lower at TUSPM. TUSPM has been working on ways to help the students prepare for the board exams. TUSPM do offer optional board review sessions run by the basic science faculty. They are also allow the students a few days off from clinic to prepare for the Part 1 of the board examination.

    Evaluations
    8. How are students evaluated academically? How are clinical evaluations performed?
    Students are evaluated academically based on an average of grades from examinations from the courses. The grading system for courses at TUSPM is based on 100 point scale. Unlike other Podiatry schools (with exception to DMU) that use letter grading system, the course grade will be reported on a scale of 0-100. If you fall below 70, you have failed the course. When I was a student, the only course that was curved was the Pathology course. Since this course is exactly identical to the MD school course, the Pathology department will curve the course for TUSPM students since it does the same for the MD students.

    Clinical evaluations are based on your performance in clinic. Various attendings will report back to the department chair (Podiatric Medicine, Podiatric Orthopedics, and Podiatric Surgery) about the student performance and a composite evaluation is generated for each individual department.

    9. Is there a formal mechanism in place for students to evaluate their professors and attending physicians? What changes have been made recently as a result of this feedback?
    Students have the opportunity to evaulate the faculty, courses, and rotations via survey forms.

    Counseling/Student Support
    10. What kind of academic, personal, financial, and career counseling is available to students? Are these services also offered to their spouses and dependents/children?
    There are array of academic, personal, financial, and career counseling services available at TUSPM and at Temple University. I am not sure if these services are offered to their spouces and dependents.

    11. Is there a mentor/advisor system? Who are the advisors—faculty members, other students, or both?
    Each incoming student is paired up with a student from the class above theirs. In addition, each student is assigned to a faculty member for advising.

    12. How diverse is the student body? Are there support services or organizations for ethnic minorities and women?
    TUSPM does have a very diverse student body. There are organizations for minority students and women on campus.

    Facilities
    13. Tell me about the library and extracurricular facilities (i.e., housing and athletic/recreational facilities).
    TUSPM is blessed with a library that is pretty comprehensive. It houses all of the necessary resources and books that students ever need. If TUSPM library does not have a service or book available, it can also be obtain through the Temple University Library system. Students will have online access to journals as well through the library.

    TUSPM has a dorm on the campus. The dorm is located right next to the academic building. The dorm offers studio, 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, 3 bedroom apartments. There is a 24 hour study lounge available for student to use.

    TUSPM students have access to the gym located in the academic building. TUSPM students will also have access to athletic facilities located on Temple University main campus. Temple main campus has a phenomenal athletic / recreational facilities.

    14. Are there computer facilities available to students? Are they integrated into the curriculum/learning?
    There are two computer labs located in the academic building. There are various courses that are done online.

    15. What type of clinical sites—ambulatory, private preceptors, private hospitals, rural settings—are available or required for clerkships? Does this school allow for students to do rotations at other institutions or internationally?
    For students doing their clinical rotations at TUSPM, majority of your Podiatry clinic rotations will be at Temple University Foot and Ankle Institute and TUSPM Surgery Center. Students will also do other clinical rotations in the local area hospitals besides Temple University Hospital. Students are allow to do their externship anywhere in the country. Students must do a minimum of 4 one month externship (clerkships). There has been a TUSPM student whom did his Orthopedic Surgery rotation in Belgium.

    For the students doing their clinical rotations at one of the core rotation sites, they will be doing their rotations at that institution.

    16. Is a car necessary for clinical rotations? Is parking a problem?
    For a few clinical sites, a car may be necessary since public transportation will not get you to that clinical sites. When you do clinical rotations, you usually rotate with a group of students and usually someone has a car and you can car pool. Majority of the clinical sites are accessible by public transportation. There is parking available on TUSPM but you do have to pay for parking.

    Financial Aid
    17. What is the current tuition and fees? Is this expected to increase yearly? If so, at what rate?
    For the 2006 - 2007 academic year, the tuition for Pennsylvania residents is $25,742 and for out of state residents is $28,358. The tuition is expected to increase every year.

    Here are some of the fees for 2006-2007 academic year:
    Matriculation fee for entering student - $100, Bone Box Deposit (first year only and refundable) - $300, NBPME Part I and II - $900 for each exam, Graduation Fee (fourth year only) - $100, Yearbook (annual for each 4 years) - $55.

    Estimated fees for the 2006-2007 academic year:
    Health insurance (single) - $1,533, Books / Supplies / Equipment (average) - $1,055, Room and Board (average) - $12,195, Transportation - $990

    18. Are there stable levels of federal financial aid and substantial amounts of university/endowment aid available to students?
    19. Are there students who have an "unmet need" factor in their budget? If so, where do these students come up with the extra funds?
    20. Are spouses and dependents/children covered in a student's budget?
    21. Is someone available to assist students with budgeting and financial planning?
    Yes, TUSPM's financial aid counselor is very helpful.

    22. Does this school provide guidance to its students, and to its graduates/alumni, on debt management?

    Student Involvement
    23. What school committees (e.g., curriculum committee) have student representation?
    24. Are students involved in (required or voluntary) community service?
    Students are involved with foot screening opportunities in the community. Through the Sports Medicine club, students will also have the opportunity to render foot care in the Boston Marathon and Marine Core Marathon.

    25. How active is the Student Council/Government? Are there other student organizations?
    TUSPM does have an active Student Council / Government. Other clubs include SNPMA, APMSA, AAWP, ACFAS student chapter, Diabetes Awareness Club, Christian Fellowship Association, Helping Hands, Practice Management Club, Radiology Club, Sports Medicine Club, ACFAOM. There are two Honor societies at TUSPM, which are Stirling Harford DiPrimio Anatomical Society and Pi Delta National Podiatric Honor Society.

    Policies
    26. Is there an established protocol for dealing with student exposure to infectious diseases? Is disability insurance provided to cover this exposure?
    Yes, there is an established protocol for dealing with student exposure to infectious disease. I am not sure about the disability insurance.

    27. Does this school provide, or does the student pay for, vaccinations against Hepatitis B or prophylactic AZT treatment in case of a needle-stick or accident?
    Not sure

    28. Is there a school Honor Code? Is there a grievance process/procedure? Are the students involved?
    Yes, there is a school Honor Code. Yes, there is a grievance process / procedure. There are two committees involved with honor code violations. One is know as the CAPS committee, which does not have any student involvement (unless this has changed recently). The other is the Honor Court committee, which consists of students from each class and a faculty advisor. Honor Court allows the student be tried by his/her peers.

    Residency
    29. May I see a list of residency programs to which this school's recent graduates were accepted?
    Yes. Here is a list of residency programs that the TUSPM Class of 2007 got placed in:

    DVA South Arizona Health System (AZ) PM&S-36
    Encino Tarzana Regional Medical Center (CA) PM&S-36
    Kaiser Foundation Hospital / Vallejo (CA) PM&S-36 (x 2)
    Kaiser Hospital / Santa Clara (CA) PSR-24+
    Kaiser San Francisco Bay Area Foot & Ankle (CA) PSR-24+ (x 2)
    Highlands - Presbyterian / St Luke's Medical Center (CO) PM&S-36
    Howard University Hospital (DC) PM&S-24
    Washington Hospital Center (DC) PSR-24+ (x 2)
    Christiana Care Health Servces (DE) PM&S-36
    Florida Hospital East Orlando (FL) PM&S-36
    Northlake Medical Center (Tucker, GA) PSR-24+ (x 2)
    DVA Atlanta (GA) PM&S-36
    Rush Oak Park Hospital (IL) PM&S-24
    East Jefferson General Hospital (LA) PSR-24
    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (MA) RPR/PSR-24
    Oakwood Healthcare Systems (MI) PM&S-36
    Providence Hospital (MI) PM&S-36
    Cooper University Hospital (NJ) PM&S-24
    Kennedy Hospital System (NJ) RPR/PSR-12 (x 2)
    Morristown Memorial Hospital (NJ) PSR-24+
    St. Barnabas Medical Center (NJ) PSR-24+ (x 2)
    Virtua West Jersey Health System (NJ) PSR-24+
    Cabrini Medical Center (NY) PM&S-24
    Interfaith Medical Center (NY) PM&S-36
    Mt Sinai Hospital of Queens (NY) PM&S-36
    New York Methodist Hospital (NY) RPR/PSR-12
    North Shore University Hospital of Forest Hills (NY) PM&S-24
    Our Lady of Mercy Medical Center (NY) PM&S-36
    United Health Services Hospital (NY) PM&S-36
    Alliance Community Hospital (OH) PM&S-36
    Grant Medical Center (OH) PSR-24+
    Bryn Mawr Hospital (PA) PM&S-36
    Community Medical Center (Scranton, PA) PM&S-36 (x2)
    Crozer Keystone / Springfield Division (PA) PM&S-36
    Frankford Hospital (PA) PM&S-36 (x 2)
    Mercy Suburban Hospital (PA) PM&S-36
    Penn Presbyterian Medical Center (PA) PM&S-36 (x 3)
    St. Luke's Hospital (PA) PM&S-36
    Temple University Hospital (PA) PSR-24+ (x 3)
    Tenet Roxborough Memorial Hsopital (PA) PM&S-36
    University of Pittsburgh Medical Center / South Side (PA) PM&S-36
    Western Pennsylvania Hospital (PA) PM&S-36
    University of Texas Health Science Center (TX) PM&S-36
    Franciscan Health System / West (WA) PM&S-36

    Questions to Ask Yourself
    30. Does this school have strengths in the type of podiatric medicine (primary care versus surgery versus biomechanics versus sports medicine) that I will want to practice?
    31. Would I be happy at this school (for at least the next four years)?
  9. All4MyDaughter

    All4MyDaughter SDN Mommystrator Staff Member Administrator SDN Senior Moderator Lifetime Donor Partner Organization

    Joined:
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    Pharmacist SDN Partner SDN Published Author NCPA Kappa Psi SDN 7+ Year Member
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Curriculum.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]1. Are there any special programs for which this podiatric medical school is noted? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Barry is the most ethnically diverse podiatry school and also has the highest percentage of female students. In a cultural melting pot like Miami, students get to experience many diverse patient populations and encounter podiatric pathologies rarely seen elsewhere..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]2. Describe this school's curriculum in the pre-clinical and clinical years. Are there any innovations, like Problem-Based Learning?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]The program’s first two years are purely didactic and laboratory based. During the third year, students have podiatry clinic or hospital medicine rotations three days per week while going to classes two days each week. Fourth year involves five or six months of externships and two “home months” in Barry clinics..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]3. Are there opportunities for students to design, conduct, and publish their own research?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Research is available and encouraged, but you do not see a great number of students taking part. With a new research director, division, and facilities, moves are being made to facilitate student research..


    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]4. Is there a note-taking service? If so, is it university-run or student-run?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Note taking services are up to each class. The class of 2009 has a note taking service which is available to all students of the class..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]5. Is there flexibility in the coursework (the number of electives) and the timing of the courses (accelerating, decelerating, and time off) during the pre-clinical and clinical years? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Coursework is pre-determined for students on the regular (4 year) program. Extended program, students have some flexibility in course scheduling, depending on the reasoning for being on the extended program. Clinical months off and “home months” are determined by lottery..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]6. Has this podiatric medical school, or any of its clinical departments, been on probation or had its accreditation revoked? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Not to my knowledge… CPME has increased approved class sizes since Barry’s program began in 1985..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]7. How do students from this podiatric medical school perform on the National Board Examinations? How does the school assist students who do not pass? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Barry does not release statistics on annual board pass rates that I am aware of. Students are given a week of basic sciences review two months before board exams as well as a week off immediately prior to the exam..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Evaluations.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]8. How are students evaluated academically? How are clinical evaluations performed? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Barry’s didactic podiatry courses are graded as follows:.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]A 90%-100%.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]B 80%- 89.99%.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]C 70%- 79.99%.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]D 66%- 69.99%.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]F below 66%.

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]There are no “re-take” exams for failing students, and those students will be dismissed or enter the extended program to remediate their failed course(s) at the dean’s discretion..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Clinical coursework and extended program students do not have “D” grades available and receive “A,” “B,” “C,” or “F” marks..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]9. Is there a formal mechanism in place for students to evaluate their professors and attending physicians? What changes have been made recently as a result of this feedback? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]All students are invited to fill out course evaluations for all courses. Students rate 20 questions regarding each course and are also allowed to write additional comments. Professors and administration read comments and make changes or review policy accordingly..
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif].
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Counseling/Student Support.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]10. What kind of academic, personal, financial, and career counseling is available to students? Are these services also offered to their spouses and dependents/children?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Barry is a large university which offers tutoring, writing assistance, counseling, career services (resume proofreading, interview tips, etc), IT support, and other services free to all students, including podiatry..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]11. Is there a mentor/advisor system? Who are the advisors—faculty members, other students, or both?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Incoming students are assigned a big brother/sister in the class above them. All students are also assigned a faculty advisor, typically a PhD faculty member during didactic years and a DPM member of clinical faculty during clinical years..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]12. How diverse is the student body? Are there support services or organizations for ethnic minorities and women? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Barry’s podiatry school is consistently the most ethnically diverse among the country’s podiatry programs. The graduate school is consistently rated the most ethnically diverse in the South region by US News ( .[FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/usnews/edu/college/rankings/brief/univmas_s_campdiv_brief.php.[FONT=Verdana, sans-serif] )..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Facilities.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]13. Tell me about the library and extracurricular facilities (i.e., housing and athletic/recreational facilities)..
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Barry’s library is aged but quite functional; it’s 4 floors with group study and private study areas. Student housing accommodates over 1000 students and ranges from 8 student suites to single private rooms for graduate students. Barry focuses highly on athletics and is one of the most competitive schools in D2 for many sports. Many of the athletic facilities were new in 2005, including the baseball field, soccer field, fitness center, weight room, and gymnasium..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]14. Are there computer facilities available to students? Are they integrated into the curriculum/learning?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Internet computers are located in the library, computer lab, and in some residence halls on campus. Wireless access (WiFi) is available in many areas, including podiatry classrooms, library, student union, etc..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]15. What type of clinical sites—ambulatory, private preceptors, private hospitals, rural settings—are available or required for clerkships? Does this school allow for students to do rotations at other institutions or internationally?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Numerous hospital and clinical affiliations are available to students. Students may apply for any CASPR clerkship as well as others in the Florida area, or they may create their own clerkship with a DPM approved by the school..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]16. Is a car necessary for clinical rotations? Is parking a problem?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]A car is not mandatory but is certainly helpful. Clinical students list carpool partners but may be excused from clinics earlier or later than their peers and wish to leave in some rotations..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Financial Aid.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]17. What is the current tuition and fees? Is this expected to increase yearly? If so, at what rate?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Podiatric medicine program tuition is currently $24,810.00 per year, and students are required to provide health insurance or purchase the university’s health plan. There are no additional lab or equipment fees aside from student personal supplies which they may wish to provide (scrubs, dissecting kit, books, etc)..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]18. Are there stable levels of federal financial aid and substantial amounts of university/endowment aid available to students? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Barry prides itself in providing extensive student merit scholarships. Most podiatry students who are accepted receive a merit scholarship that is renewable with a 3.0gpa annually; award amounts vary based on matriculant qualifications. Virtually all students, even those who fail to maintain their merit scholarships, are receiving at least some scholarship amount from the school..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]19. Are there students who have an "unmet need" factor in their budget? If so, where do these students come up with the extra funds? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Some students take out additional funding in addition to the standard $38,500 allowed for graduate health students. I do not require or receive said additional funding, so you would need to contact FinAid directly with concerns..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]20. Are spouses and dependents/children covered in a student's budget? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Not to my knowledge; I do not think that is the idea of student loans (ie for the student’s educational related expenses). Additional available private loans above the standard amount may cover some family costs. Again, contact FinAid..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]21. Is someone available to assist students with budgeting and financial planning?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Office of FinAid and office of Student Accounts have multiple officers dedicated to handling and discussing graduate financial aid concerns..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]22. Does this school provide guidance to its students, and to its graduates/alumni, on debt management? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Debt counseling and exit counseling is mandatory on graduation. Students may set up appointments to discuss FinAid concerns with a graduate student loan officer at any time..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Student Involvement.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]23. What school committees (e.g., curriculum committee) have student representation?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Curriculum committee, academic committee, grievance committee, and other committees have student representation..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]24. Are students involved in (required or voluntary) community service? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Community service is voluntary, and opportunities are arranged by a designated class officer. Participation is generally good with some events filling quickly..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]25. How active is the Student Council/Government? Are there other student organizations?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Barry’s podiatry student government, Florida Podiatric Medical Student Association (FPMSA) meets monthly with elected school leaders, class leaders, and club leaders in attendance. Student government is fairly active. Class and club government activity can range anywhere from great to poor… it all depends who is running and participating in the given groups and how much work they put in..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Policies.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]26. Is there an established protocol for dealing with student exposure to infectious diseases? Is disability insurance provided to cover this exposure?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Protocol for needle sticks and other exposures is discussed during clinical orientations. Students will be referred to university health services if in a Barry clinic or sent to nearest ER if in a hospital rotation. Clinical director’s secretary must be immediately notified and will direct proper course of action..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]27. Does this school provide, or does the student pay for, vaccinations against Hepatitis B or prophylactic AZT treatment in case of a needle-stick or accident?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Students must obtain and provide documentation of HepB and numerous other vaccinations before beginning hospital rotations. If student elects university health plan, it will pay for up to $100 of vaccinations annually. In case of possible HIV exposure, directives described in previous question is followed; I have no idea who pays for that and hope I don’t have to find out..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]28. Is there a school Honor Code? Is there a grievance process/procedure? Are the students involved?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]The student handbook details the program’s professional conduct code standards as well as academic grievance and appeal procedures..

    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Residency.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]29. May I see a list of residency programs to which this school's recent graduates were accepted? .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]I’m not sure if that data is made readily available, but if interested, contact the university directly. .
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif].
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]Questions to Ask Yourself.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]30. Does this school have strengths in the type of podiatric medicine (primary care versus surgery versus biomechanics versus sports medicine) that I will want to practice?.
    [FONT=Verdana, sans-serif]31. Would I be happy at this school (for at least the next four years)?.
  10. checho

    checho

    Joined:
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    Pre-Podiatry
    Hi first of all. I am an assistant of a podolog in Turkey. She is at the same time the manager of the podiatry association in our country. However to prove her identity in our country she has to have a licence. But the universities don't give podiatry education in Turkey. So we need to learn about your education system. At the same time, we wonder that whether we can take this education with scholorship or how we can take your system to our country, because we really need help. Without a license noone takes us into consideration. Hope to receive message from you soon.
  11. jonwill

    jonwill SDN Senior Moderator Moderator Emeritus

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    Podiatrist SDN 7+ Year Member
    Start out with 4 years of college, then 4 years of podiatry school (similar to regular medical school with more of a focus on the foot and ankle), then a three year surgical residency. For the most part, in the United States of America, Podiatrist = Foot and Ankle Surgeon.
  12. jxf8600

    jxf8600

    Joined:
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    do anyone no what are my chances concerning my gpa to get into nycpm im a junior at university of texas at arlington i have a 2.89 gpa and i have three semester left to bring it up , where im guessing its going to stop at a 3.3 in science and overall, but im taking my chems and physics at a community college and my upper level science at my university.
  13. Charlieisadope

    Charlieisadope

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    SDN 2+ Year Member
    yeah but the MHPE or whatever is not really a "Masters", more like AZPOD is trying its hand at "research" and their own IRB. Anyone thinking on going for it is wasting his/her money and time. If you want a DPM get a DPM, if you want research, then become and MD or PhD or get a real Masters from a good school. There isn't a whole lot of demand for pod research, Root has made his mark with all that biomechanics stuff.
    I mean no offense by it of course.

  14. PMSIII

    PMSIII

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    Pretty ignorant statement considering that there's alot of research being pumped into various aspects of foot and ankle surgery like Orthobiologics, woundcare, fixation, postoperative management/protocols etc. Many of these projects have teams of DPM's (ACFAS) and Fellowship trained orthopedic surgeons (AOFAS) publishing their studies in respective journals.
  15. smartman716

    smartman716

    Joined:
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    Podiatry Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Yes, I agree. This individual's statement is ludicrous. Charlieisadope, I suggest you go over the profile of Lee C. Rogers, DPM, here on Student Doctor Network. As PMS III stated, there is so much untapped research on the foot and ankle. With a DPM (and mandatory 3-year residency), research and clinical practice is feasible, with or without a PhD. In fact there are many DPMs (PI, ABPS, ACFAS, ABPOPPM, etc.) who do not have PhDs. that are heavily involved with podiatric research.
    Last edited: 08.03.09
  16. DR ADDYBEAR

    DR ADDYBEAR

    Joined:
    09.14.09
    Messages:
    1
    Status:
    Podiatry Student
    Hi Jon
    Don't forget about the College of Podiatric Medicine at Western University of Health Sciences. :)
  17. newdoc79

    newdoc79

    Joined:
    10.07.08
    Messages:
    9
    You probably have a good chance as long as your science GPA is what you say its going to be. Don't take to many classes at the cc or a different cc's and make sure you keep and your GPA above 3.0
  18. newdoc79

    newdoc79

    Joined:
    10.07.08
    Messages:
    9

    You probably have a good chance as long as your science GPA is what you say its going to be. Don't take to many classes at the cc or a different cc's and make sure you keep and your GPA above 3.0
  19. randy123

    randy123

    Joined:
    10.21.09
    Messages:
    4
    Hi, I'm a student in grade 12 and I am having a lot of difficulty in finding a college/university that offers a chiropody program. I live in Ontario and I want to be a chiropodist. Are there any programs that you know of that I can take? I know there is Micheners Institute in Toronto...but that means that I will have to spend four years in University to earn a bachelors degree and then three years at Micheners Institute, correct? That is not really what i'm looking for ..because 7 years in post secondary education is too much schooling....I have looked all over and am having trouble knowing where to go and what programs to apply for since I cant find anything. I have to start applying soon and am becoming desperate to find some sort of post-secondary education where I can become a chiropodist. Is there any alternatives instead of studying for 7 years or is there something else offered in micheners institute that I could look into that is less schooling? thanks
  20. Shireiqiang

    Shireiqiang

    Joined:
    01.11.09
    Messages:
    125
    Status:
    Podiatry Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    You may be in the looking in the wrong place to find information on chiropody. Try a few of these links they may help you.

    http://www.michener.ca/ft/chiropody.php

    http://www.podiatry-arena.com/podiatry-forum/forumdisplay.php?f=13

    Chiropody is not the same as podiatry. If you don't want to go to school for seven years you are definitely in the wrong place. Podiatry is full on medical school. That means a bachelors degree (or 90 credit hours at most schools), and then four more years of podiatric medical school, and then a three year residency.
  21. DrMushroomFoot

    DrMushroomFoot

    Joined:
    12.18.09
    Messages:
    115
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Bump!

    Excellent thread for prospective students to read.
  22. darazon

    darazon

    Joined:
    02.19.09
    Messages:
    330
    Location:
    OR
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Podiatrist SDN 5+ Year Member
    College of Podiatric Medicine
    Western University of Health Sciences


    Curriculum
    1. Are there any special programs for which this podiatric medical school is noted?


    Western currently offers a joint DPM/MSHS which takes 5 years to complete. There is also plans to offer a joint DPM/DO degree which would also take 5 years to complete, this is not yet available and there is no set time table as to if/when it will be available.

    Essentials of Clinical Medicine (ECM) is a class that runs the entire first 2 years of the training at Western for the DPM and DO students. It provides an opportunity for students to learn clinical skills not taught in the classroom. Classes are every week for 4 hours. Students go to the clinical skills lab and interact with standardized patients (actors essentially) that present with different complaints. Students are expected to enter the room and perform a History and Physical (H&P) in under 14 minutes. Students then must document the encounter in a SOAP note. Patients present with anything ranging from COPD, sinusitis, choleocystitis, gout, TIA, and ankle sprains.

    Interprofessional Education (IPE) is a class that incorporates students from all of Western's 9 colleges. Student's work up cases as part of an Interprofessional team.
    2. Describe this school's curriculum in the pre-clinical and clinical years. Are there any innovations, like Problem-Based Learning?

    DPM students at Western take every class side-by-side with the DO students along with the exact same exams. Except for OMM (Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine). In OMM's place DPM students take PMP (Principles of Podiatric Medicine).

    Western teaches the majority of its classes as Problem Based Learning (PBL). Also, classes are taught in blocks and are mostly system based. The first few classes are lectured based (anatomy, MCBM, IDIT, Neuro) and then afterwards it is switched to system based classes. These classes incorporate the traditional classes (micro, pharm, immune, path, physio) into the system and is taught by working through real world cases in small groups and then meeting together as the entire class (DPM and DO) for a large group session to go over the cases.

    The first 2 years are in the classroom, while the latter 2 years are completely hospital based -no classes. All student hospital rotations are with other medical students, mostly from Western but also UCLA. Students receive 6 months for clerkships, 2 months are in the 3rd year, all before CRIPS.

    PMP is taught throughout the first 2 years and is completely PBL. PMP incorporates all of the regular DPM classes into one (biomechanics, LEA, surgery etc) that runs the entire year. Small groups meet with faculty to work up cases.

    3rd Year:
    You start clinical rotations the beginning of your 3rd year, that means no more classes at all. Rotations are at the local SoCal hospitals/residencies for 3rd year. Rotations include: Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Podiatric Surgery/Medicine, Orthopedic Surgery, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Anesthesia, Cardiology, Urology etc etc. You do not have 2-3 months of clipping toenails at Western. All rotations, minus podiatry, are along side DO/MD students and you function as a integral part of that team. You are expected to know as much as them and to do the exact same things as them. You have 2 externships at the end of your 3rd year.

    4th Year:
    You have option of moving anywhere in the country you would like for 4th year for your core rotations. As long as the hospital is a teaching institution. You have another 4-5 externships during your 4th year all before crips. Core rotations include Medicine sub-specialty, Surgery sub-specialty, and for some students a Medicine Sub-I.
    3. Are there opportunities for students to design, conduct, and publish their own research?

    There are plenty of opportunities if one is interested to work with faculty members on research. Students have been published in journals and have won national competitions for their research.​

    4. Is there a note-taking service? If so, is it university-run or student-run?

    No. If there are any lectures, all powerpoints and documents are provided.
    5. Is there flexibility in the coursework (the number of electives) and the timing of the courses (accelerating, decelerating, and time off) during the pre-clinical and clinical years?

    The only flexibility to this is to take the Intensive Summer Anatomy Course (ISAC) before you matriculate in August. Students who take this course do no need to take anatomy with the rest of the class in August.
    6. Has this podiatric medical school, or any of its clinical departments, been on probation or had its accreditation revoked?

    Nope. Western is not yet fully accredited. This will occur in 2013 when the first class is about to graduate.
    The Council on Podiatric Medical Education (CPME), the professional accreditation body for Podiatric Medicine, has granted Western "candidate status", which is the second of three steps in CPME's accreditation process.
    7. How do students from this podiatric medical school perform on the National Board Examinations? How does the school assist students who do not pass?

    100% part 1 & part 2 pass rate for class of 2013.
    Evaluations
    8. How are students evaluated academically? How are clinical evaluations performed?

    Pre-clinically, students are graded on a percentage scale (70% needed to pass) which is then converted to a GPA for reporting to clerkships/residencies. Clinically, students are graded on a pass, pass with honors, and fail scale. Grades for clinics is a combination of evaluations by the specific rotation and an OSCE.
    9. Is there a formal mechanism in place for students to evaluate their professors and attending physicians? What changes have been made recently as a result of this feedback?

    After every class that is taken there is a mandatory course evaluation where students can rate the class and the professors and provide any feedback. There have been many changes made to the PMP class because of this.
    Counseling/Student Support
    10. What kind of academic, personal, financial, and career counseling is available to students? Are these services also offered to their spouses and dependents/children?

    Services are offered through the Learning Enhancement and Academic Development (LEAD) office. They offer tutors, workshops, and counseling. I don't believe counseling is extended to spouses and dependants.
    11. Is there a mentor/advisor system? Who are the advisors—faculty members, other students, or both?

    Each student is paired up with a faculty advisor and a upper classman buddy.
    12. How diverse is the student body? Are there support services or organizations for ethnic minorities and women?

    It's Southern California –pretty diverse.
    Facilities
    13. Tell me about the library and extracurricular facilities (i.e., housing and athletic/recreational facilities).

    Library is your basic library. Nobody studies there though.
    The main building the DPM students will be in is the Health Education Center (HEC). It houses 2 large auditoriums (around 300 seats or so), numerous small auditoriums, and many study rooms each with a 40" LCD screen and white boards. It was completed in 2010.
    There is 1 on-campus housing unit, the Helix. There are plans for another much larger complex to be starting construction in late 2011.
    There are no indoor recreational facilities on campus. Students have free admission to the YMCA 3 blocks away and are given $100 to a gym membership.
    14. Are there computer facilities available to students? Are they integrated into the curriculum/learning?

    There are computer work-stations all over campus; most of these sit empty as everyone must have their own laptop computer.
    15. What type of clinical sites—ambulatory, private preceptors, private hospitals, rural settings—are available or required for clerkships? Does this school allow for students to do rotations at other institutions or internationally?

    Core 3rd year clinical hospital sites are; Downey Regional Medical Center, UCLA-Olive View, VA West Los Angeles, Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, Riverside Regional Medical Center, Chino Valley Medical Center, and Western's own PCC. Obviously clerkships can be taken at any of the residencies located across the country, or at other approved facilities. 4th year students can pick almost any teaching hospital in the US to do a core rotation at. Additionally students can rotate in Japan, Australia, China, Singapore, Vietnam, New Zealand, South America, Brazil, Mexico, Canada, Africa, India, England, Wales, Italy, France, The Netherlands, Germany, Israel and the Philippines. Western will develop international rotations based on student interest.
    16. Is a car necessary for clinical rotations? Is parking a problem?

    A car is absolutely needed. This is LA, traffic is horrible and the commutes can be long! You can get a motorcycle and lane split and travel in the HOV (all legal in CA!!). Parking is not an issue.
    Financial Aid
    17. What is the current tuition and fees? Is this expected to increase yearly? If so, at what rate?

    As of 2011, tuition is $30,565.00. In 2009 it was about $2000 less.
    18. Are there stable levels of federal financial aid and substantial amounts of university/endowment aid available to students?

    Western does provide scholarships to incoming students. Because the program is new, the scholarships probably are not as generous as other DPM programs.
    19. Are there students who have an "unmet need" factor in their budget? If so, where do these students come up with the extra funds?

    Not Sure.
    20. Are spouses and dependents/children covered in a student's budget?

    Nope. I believe that is federal legislation that prevents this.
    21. Is someone available to assist students with budgeting and financial planning?

    Yes.
    22. Does this school provide guidance to its students, and to its graduates/alumni, on debt management?

    Not 100% sure, but I think so.
    Student Involvement
    23. What school committees (e.g., curriculum committee) have student representation?

    ACFAS, APMSA, and the million other student bodies at the school.
    24. Are students involved in (required or voluntary) community service?

    Yes it is required and there are many other opportunities as well.
    25. How active is the Student Council/Government? Are there other student organizations?

    Pretty active.
    Policies
    26. Is there an established protocol for dealing with student exposure to infectious diseases? Is disability insurance provided to cover this exposure?

    Not sure about this one.
    27. Does this school provide, or does the student pay for, vaccinations against Hepatitis B or prophylactic AZT treatment in case of a needle-stick or accident?

    Again, not sure.​
    28. Is there a school Honor Code? Is there a grievance process/procedure? Are the students involved?

    Yes, and not sure.
    Residency
    29. May I see a list of residency programs to which this school's recent graduates were accepted?

    Class of 2013:
    Swedish
    Legacy/Kaiser
    VA-Palo Alto x2
    Cedars Sinai
    Long Beach Memorial x2
    Olympia Medical Center
    VA LA/UCLA x2
    Scripps
    Intermountain Utah
    Detroit Medical Center
    UPMC
    Yale
    Botsford
    Grant Medical
    Ohio State
    Regions Hospital
    Hennepin County
    Questions to Ask Yourself
    30. Does this school have strengths in the type of podiatric medicine (primary care versus surgery versus biomechanics versus sports medicine) that I will want to practice?

    Dr. Larry Harkless, the Dean of Western, is known for his work in diabetic womb care. Dr. Lester Jones, Associate Dean, is known for his work in biomechanics.
    31. Would I be happy at this school (for at least the next four years)?

    You decide!​
    Last edited: 05.01.13
  23. BTR1208

    BTR1208

    Joined:
    02.02.12
    Messages:
    133
    Status:
    Pre-Dental
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Anybody do one of these for Scholl? That would be big help!
  24. MaxillofacialMN

    MaxillofacialMN Osteopathic Foot Dentist

    Joined:
    12.02.09
    Messages:
    2,834
    Location:
    The Grand Ballroom
    Status:
    Podiatry Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Maybe ask below in the regular thread section?
  25. JackedUp

    JackedUp

    Joined:
    01.13.08
    Messages:
    101
    Status:
    Podiatry Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Curriculum
    1. Are there any special programs for which this podiatric medical school is noted?

    CLEAR or Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research. It is research program started several years ago by Dr. Armstrong. He is currently not at Scholl anymore but there is a great research team here that allows students to participate. Here is a link CLEAR

    2. Describe this school's curriculum in the pre-clinical and clinical years. Are there any innovations, like Problem-Based Learning?

    Scholls curriculum is Basic Science for 2 years and Clinical rotations for 2 years. During your basic sciences classes like Essentials of Clinical Reasoning,Gross Anatomy, and pathology are shared with the students of Chicago Medical School. Other classes such as Lower extremity anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, histology, neurology, pharmacology, and microbiology are not. There are labs for essentials of clinical reasoning where standardized pts or actors come in to present cases and you take a history and physical and attempt to improve your diagnostic skills.

    3. Are there opportunities for students to design, conduct, and publish their own research?

    Yes, refer to question number 1.

    4. Is there a note-taking service? If so, is it university-run or student-run?

    Currently there is no official note taking services run by the school or the students, however many of the lectures are audio recorded and available online or from other students

    5. Is there flexibility in the coursework (the number of electives) and the timing of the courses (accelerating, decelerating, and time off) during the pre-clinical and clinical years?

    There are no electives, all students take all classes and labs together. The only accelerated courses that i know of were for the students participating in research over the summer. It was only one course.

    6. Has this podiatric medical school, or any of its clinical departments, been on probation or had its accreditation revoked?

    Not that I'm aware of

    7. How do students from this podiatric medical school perform on the National Board Examinations? How does the school assist students who do not pass?

    Class of 2012 APMLE I First Time pass rate 88%. Overall 99%
    Class of 2012 AMPLE II First time pass rate 92%.

    Tutoring for board preparation is available for students who need it. Information and study packets are available for everyone. Some professor's hold board review courses

    Evaluations
    8. How are students evaluated academically? How are clinical evaluations performed?

    Academically through grades and GPA

    Clinical evaluations are rated on knowledge of basic science, ability to apply basic science, knowledge of clinical information, professionalism, ability to write soap notes, ability to take a history and physical, ability to present patients, ability to perform and assist in surgery.

    9. Is there a formal mechanism in place for students to evaluate their professors and attending physicians? What changes have been made recently as a result of this feedback?

    Yes at Scholl professor evaluations are done on every class we've ever taken, and select students are asked to participate in a panel to discuss how courses a can be made better.

    Counseling/Student Support
    10. What kind of academic, personal, financial, and career counseling is available to students? Are these services also offered to their spouses and dependents/children?

    I know they are available but unfortunately I cannot comment because i have never used these resources

    11. Is there a mentor/advisor system? Who are the advisors—faculty members, other students, or both?

    Yes there is a big brother/big sister program available. Also the majority of the faculty would be willing to mentor and advise in a reasonable fashion.

    12. How diverse is the student body? Are there support services or organizations for ethnic minorities and women?

    It is diverse here are some statistics for class of 2012:
    62 Male
    25 Female
    Average age is 28.8

    Entire School M F Total
    American Indian 4 2 6
    Asian 28 29 57
    Black 6 8 14
    Hispanic 8 6 14
    White 116 72 188
    Other 69 35 104

    Yes several organizations exist like Student National Medical Association, South Asian Medical Association, Association for Women in Medicine, and several others.



    Facilities
    13. Tell me about the library and extracurricular facilities (i.e., housing and athletic/recreational facilities).

    The Library is standard, not too large and not too small. Wifi, computer labs, printing, copying, scanning, and most resources are available. Cubicle and group study areas are available. Usually open 24hrs/daily except for hollidays.

    14. Are there computer facilities available to students? Are they integrated into the curriculum/learning?

    Yes, some of our exams are taken in the computer lab such Essentials of Clinical Reasoning, and Histology.

    15. What type of clinical sites—ambulatory, private preceptors, private hospitals, rural settings—are available or required for clerkships? Does this school allow for students to do rotations at other institutions or internationally?

    During or 2nd and 3rd year the Scholl Foot and Ankle clinic is student run clinic which provides students with real life experience in Podiatry. Currently the clinic is slow and students see approximately 1-2pts during a morning or afternoon shift. Students are allowed and encouraged to do rotations at other institutions in chicago and all across the United States during externships. I don't know of any podiatry rotations internationally

    16. Is a car necessary for clinical rotations? Is parking a problem?

    I would have to say yes. Chicago has a good public transportation system, but having car would makes things a great deal easier. Parking can be a problem downtown and at certain hospitals. My car has been broken into, and i know of several students who have had similar episodes. Also if you expect to do a lot of traveling to different states a car would help.

    Financial Aid
    17. What is the current tuition and fees? Is this expected to increase yearly? If so, at what rate?

    Base Tuition $30,424
    Fees $1,513
    Insurance $1,800
    Books $2,467
    Living Expenses $15,300
    Total $51,504

    Tuition did increase yearly every year I was here, so I would say i would expect it to increase yearly. I cannot say what the rate will be.

    18. Are there stable levels of federal financial aid and substantial amounts of university/endowment aid available to students?

    Yes

    19. Are there students who have an "unmet need" factor in their budget? If so, where do these students come up with the extra funds?

    I would assume yes. Unfortunately i cannot comment because i have no experience in this area. My student loans covered mostly every thing

    20. Are spouses and dependents/children covered in a student's budget?

    Again I cannot comment I am single w/ no children.

    21. Is someone available to assist students with budgeting and financial planning?

    Yes, usually by appointment. There is also a mandatory Financial aid counseling before graduation.

    22. Does this school provide guidance to its students, and to its graduates/alumni, on debt management?


    Yes, refer to question 21.

    Student Involvement
    23. What school committees (e.g., curriculum committee) have student representation?

    Students are involved in the curriculum committee and the Executive Student Council.

    24. Are students involved in (required or voluntary) community service?

    There is voluntary and required community service opportunities at school. During the medicine capstone in the early part of your third year you are required to do foot screening and attend free clinics. Also several community service opportunities are available weekly if you pay attention to your emails.

    25. How active is the Student Council/Government? Are there other student organizations?

    They are extremely active, however I was not a part of it and attended only one meeting during my four years. They do keep the students informed very well through e-mail.

    Policies
    26. Is there an established protocol for dealing with student exposure to infectious diseases? Is disability insurance provided to cover this exposure?

    Yes, and Yes

    27. Does this school provide, or does the student pay for, vaccinations against Hepatitis B or prophylactic AZT treatment in case of a needle-stick or accident?

    The school will pay provided you are covered by the schools health insurance

    28. Is there a school Honor Code? Is there a grievance process/procedure? Are the students involved?

    Yes, Yes, and Yes.

    Residency
    29. May I see a list of residency programs to which this school's recent graduates were accepted?

    95% Match rate for Class of 2012 who are eligible to match.
    Currently 4 students who are eligible to match still do not have programs

    St. Marys Hospital - NJ - 1
    Westside - FL - 1
    Kingston Hospital - NY - 1
    Mt. Sinai - North Chicago - 3
    Weiss Memorial - IL - 1
    New York Hospital - Queens - 1
    Mercy Hospital and Medical Center - IL - 1
    Mercy Saint Vincent - OH - 1
    Bridgeport - CT - 1
    Oakwood - MI - 1
    Jewish - OH - 1
    Jesse Brown - IL - 3
    Detroit Medical Center - 2
    Yale-New Haven - CT - 1
    Ohio State Univ Hosp - 1
    Dekalb - 1
    POH Regionl Medical Center - MI - 1
    West Houston - TX - 1
    St. Vincent - MA - 1
    Community Westview - IN - 1
    Loretto Hosp - IL - 1
    South Miami - 1
    Loyola Univ Med Center- IL - 2
    Kaiser San Fran Foot & Ankle - 2
    Lakewood Regional Center - CA -1
    INOVA - 1
    Steward - St. Elizabeth Med - MA - 1
    Kingwood - TX - 1
    Gunderson Lutheran - WI - 1
    Columbia - St. Mary's - WI - 1
    Genesys Regional Med Center - MI - 2
    Atlanta VA med center - 1
    Rush Health System - IL - 2
    VA MD Healthcare system - 1
    Sacred Heart Hospital - IL - 2
    Our Lady Lourdes - NY - 2
    Gouverneur Healthcare services - NY - 1
    VA Puget Sound - WA - 1
    Wheaton Franciscan - WI - 1
    Advocate Illinois Masonic - 2
    Botsford - MI - 2
    St. Joseph - IL - 2
    Norton Audubon - KY - 1
    St. Mary & Elizabeth - IL - 1
    St. Mary Health system - IN - 1
    Swedish Medical Center - WA - 1
    Norwegian American Hosp - IL - 1
    Henry Ford Macomb - MI - 1
    Hunt Regional Med Center - TX - 1
    Intermountain Med Center - UT - 1
    St. Margaret Mercy - IN - 1
    Cedars Sinai Med Center - CA - 1
    Christiana Care Health - DE - 1
    Providence Hospital - MI - 1
    Jackson South Community Hospital - FL - 1
    VA Greater LA Healthcare Center - CA - 1
    Staten Island Univ Hosp - NY - 1
    Mercy Hosp - IL - 1
    Medstar Washington Hosp Center - DC - 1

    Questions to Ask Yourself
    30. Does this school have strengths in the type of podiatric medicine (primary care versus surgery versus biomechanics versus sports medicine) that I will want to practice?

    I believe yes. During your 3rd year you will have specific 6 wk long capstones in primary podiatric medicine, radiology, orthopaedics, and surgery.

    31. Would I be happy at this school (for at least the next four years)?

    I was relatively happy most of the time.......
  26. violinrae

    violinrae

    Joined:
    07.24.12
    Messages:
    6
    Status:
    Pre-Podiatry
    I am applying to podiatry school very soon for admission for the class of sept 2014. I have a GPA of a 3.75 and an MCAT score of 19 (I am retaking it in less than 2 weeks). I'm really nervous that it won't get much higher than a 19, maybe 20. I have many student involvement activities and leadership roles in each, cancer research experience, i work on an ambulance, and am a very good student. Do you think if I applied with an MCAT of 19 I would still get accepted to the NY podiatry school?
  27. ashtonmccants

    ashtonmccants

    Joined:
    07.28.12
    Messages:
    1
    Status:
    Pre-Podiatry
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    I spoke with someone on the board of admissions at NYPOD. You are a competitive applicant as is with a 3.75 GPA. Just make sure you get a few hours of podiatry shadowing experience so that you can be sure that this is what you want to do, or at least be able to show the admissions committee that this is what you want to do. They look at the overall applicant, not just your MCAT score. Good luck in your endeavors to pursue podiatry. See you on the other side ;).
  28. SK2013

    SK2013 SK2013

    Joined:
    04.26.12
    Messages:
    9
    Status:
    Podiatry Student
    Curriculum
    1. Are there any special programs for which this podiatric medical school is noted?

    The recent affiliation between the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine and Kent State University to create a single academic entity: Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine (KSUCPM) offers numerous benefits to students.

    • The development of dual-degree programs, such as Masters of Business Administration, Masters of
    Public Health, and Ph.D. programs in various sciences. In addition, you may be able to take advantage
    of programs in the College of Education, Health and Human Services.

    • Access to all men's and women's sports teams that exist at Kent State. You will be able to work with
    our faculty, Kent State trainers and team physicians, and be exposed to a variety of varsity and
    intramural sports activities involving both males and females.

    • Academically, college faculty and students will have the opportunity to engage in research programs
    with public health, biomedical sciences, and of course sports medicine.

    In addition, KSUCPM is the only podiatry school to have a Practice Management curriculum taught by the leading podiatrists and doctors in the country. This curriculum was created by the American Academy of Podiatric Practice Management. Students begin classes in practice management during the first year and continue with classes throughout all four years.

    2. Describe this school's curriculum in the pre-clinical and clinical years. Are there any innovations, like Problem-Based Learning?

    1st Year
    Fall:
    Biochemistry (2 days a week), Genetics/Embryology, Histology (2 days a week + lab once a week), Gross Anatomy (2 days a week + lab twice a week after class), Research and Methods/Medical Ethics (1 credit hour course meets once a week), Practice Management (once a MONTH)

    Spring:
    Physiology (2 days a week), Microbiology/Immunology (2-3 days a week+ lab), Lower Extremity Anatomy (2 days a week + lab 2 times a week in the evenings), Physical Diagnosis (1-2 times a week depending on your lab group and lecture schedule), Neurobiology (2 days a week), Practice management (once a MONTH)

    Summer:
    Biomechanics 1, Radiology, Lower Extremity Physical Diagnosis, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

    Clinic:
    During your first year, each student spends one day at the Cleveland Foot and Ankle Clinic

    2nd Year
    Fall:
    Pathology (2 days a week), Pharmacology (2 days a week), Biomechanics 2, Radiology 2,
    Pod Med 1, Practice Management (Once a MONTH)
    You also go to clinic 2-4 times per semester during the 2nd year
    4-week Standardized Patients course (Clinic Groups sometime during the 2nd year)

    Spring:
    Pathology, Pharmacology, Radiology 3, Pod Med 2, Podiatric Surgery 1, Practice Management, Podiatric Medical Skills

    3rd Year
    (Fall - Starts in June of 2nd year):
    Study and take Part 1 boards in July, General Medicine (2 days a week), Podiatric Surgery 2 (1 day a week), Dermatology (1 day a week), Neurology (1 day a week), Podopediatric (1 day a week), Practice Management

    Clinic every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday all year

    Spring:
    General Medicine, Podiatric Surgery 3, Traumatology, Sports medicine, Behavioral Medicine (for 1st half of semester only), Public Health (for 1st half of semester), and Public law (for 2nd half of semester), Women’s Health, Practice Management

    4th year
    6 core rotations (1 month at each of the 2 school clinics, 2 months for Senior Medicine for which there are multiple locations for you to choose from, 1 month of Community Medicine, and 1 month at the VA) and 6 externships (1 of which must be a private practice; You do not have to do all 6 externships, You can take a month off)

    3. Are there opportunities for students to design, conduct, and publish their own research? Students have the opportunity to design, conduct, and publish their own research. Usually 1st years do not participate in any research projects because their class schedules are so time consuming. However, starting in the 2nd year, more students start participating in research.

    There are certain organizations that require a group research project to be submitted by the officers of the organization, such as ACFAS (American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons). In fact, our students have always placed 1st, 2nd or 3rd in the ACFAS research poster competition. This is held every year.

    If you want to design your own research, there are multiple faculty members willing to mentor you individually. You also have the option to join existing research projects that other faculty members have in place.

    4. Is there a note-taking service? If so, is it university-run or student-run?
    Currently there is no “note-taking” service. All professors submit their PowerPoint slides/presentation to the school prior to class (usually at the beginning of the semester) and these are uploaded online. Once uploaded, you can download the notes onto your computers to take notes electronically (if you have PDF annotator or a tablet), you can print them out yourself to take notes, or you can place an order at Fed-ex/Kinkos (which is 2 minutes from the school, in the shopping plaza next to school) to have your notes printed (you can have them stapled, 3-hole punched or bound into books – whatever you want) for a very reasonable price (for example, a semesters worth of notes for all classes probably would cost about $50-70). Having the notes printed for you makes your life much easier because all you have to do in class is listen to the professor and add any extra info you want. We receive a 60% discount from Kinkos and that applies to anything you want to print out – it is not just for school notes.

    KSUCPM also has mediasite, which allows students to go back and listen to lectures.

    5. Is there flexibility in the coursework (the number of electives) and the timing of the courses (accelerating, decelerating, and time off) during the pre-clinical and clinical years?

    Unfortunately, the coursework is the same for everyone and it doesn’t allow for much altering. For the first 2 years, the coursework and schedule is the same for every student.

    During the 3rd year, students are in clinic three days a week and the other two days we have other courses (General Medicine, Podiatric Surgery, Dermatology, Traumatology, Sports Medicine, Podopeds, etc.). During the 3rd year students have a series of 8 rotations and we are assigned the order in which we rotate. During our 4th year, we have 6 months for which we can choose 6 different programs anywhere in the country. The other 6 months are core rotations in Cleveland.

    In terms of time off, during your 1st year you have a few days off for Thanksgiving, two weeks off for Christmas, one week for spring break, one week off between the end of the Spring semester and the start of the summer semester, and then 3 weeks off for summer vacation.
    During your 2nd year, a student will have a few days off for Thanksgiving, two weeks for Christmas, one week for spring break, and three-four weeks at the end of the Spring semester to study for Boards Part 1.

    Your 3rd year classes usually start at the mid-end of June. Your 3rd year you may have the day of Thanksgiving off and you may have one week off for Christmas. Your time off your 3rd year depends on what rotation you have during the holiday season.

    Your 4th year is like 3rd year, it all depends on what rotation you are in when the holidays are occurring.

    6. Has this podiatric medical school, or any of its clinical departments, been on probation or had its accreditation revoked? No.
    The College is accredited by the podiatric accrediting body of the Council on Podiatric Medical Education (CPME) of the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA).
    KSUCPM is also accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

    7. How do students from this podiatric medical school perform on the National Board Examinations? How does the school assist students who do not pass?
    KSUCPM remains near or at the national average for board pass rates. The national pass rate average is usually between 80-85% (First-time).

    For students who do not pass, the school provides private tutors to help them. For those who failed to pass part 1 on the first try, the school releases students from their clinical rotation for 1 month so that the student has time to focus on studying for re-exams.

    KSUCPM also has board reviews for students and will frequently send out articles that will help you prepare.

    Evaluations
    8. How are students evaluated academically? How are clinical evaluations performed?

    Academically, we have pop-quizzes, quizzes, projects, presentations, papers and exams. A student should expect three exams per class, per semester during your 1st and 2nd years. When you are a 3rd year, you can expect two exams per class, per semester.

    Clinically, the majority of the rotations have an exam that is given at the end of the month that you must pass to pass the rotation. Certain rotations have papers and presentations that you may need to submit in order to pass the rotation.

    9. Is there a formal mechanism in place for students to evaluate their professors and attending physicians? What changes have been made recently as a result of this feedback?
    At the end of each semester, students are sent a course evaluation for each and every class. It is voluntary so you don’t HAVE to fill it out, however if you don’t let the professor know what he/she is supposed to change, how will they know? On the other hand, for those professors who you think did a phenomenal job should also know just how awesome they are too.

    At the end of each rotation, we have to fill out a mandatory evaluation regarding the rotation. Obviously we don’t experience any changes made as a result of feedback because we already completed that course, so all I know if what the underclassmen tell me. For example, biochemistry and physiology were super hard courses and our class thought that we would have been more prepared if we had quizzes. This past year the professor not only added quizzes to the class but also added group projects and presentations. Most professors usually add quizzes or more clinical case studies to better help prepare us. One of our attending’s also e-sails us monthly case studies and mock questions to help prepare us for part 2 boards.

    Counseling/Student Support
    10. What kind of academic, personal, financial, and career counseling is available to students? Are these services also offered to their spouses and dependents/children?

    Everybody at KSUCPM is very close. If you need any guidance, you can approach any of the faculty members or staff to help you. I personally talk to Teri Novak, Lorie Frank, or Dean Lott if I have any concerns or problems. If they are unable to help me, they always point me in the direction of people that can. Teri Novak is an amazing person for academic and career counseling; she also heads up the tutoring services so she can really help us. Kathy Wright is in charge of financial aid and is always willing to help us with our financial problems. What I appreciate most about Kathy is that she is willing to skip her lunch hour to help students since on most days lunch is our only free time and the only time we can come and get some work done. Besides the staff and faculty at KSUCPM, we also have therapists/counselors at Case Western Reserve University that are willing to help us.

    Last year, KSUCPM even brought in someone to help us address any issues we may have with test anxiety. They are always looking for ways to help us to manage our time and our stress associated with classes/tests.

    As far as career counseling, we have an Office of Graduate Placement who is dedicated to helping students learn more about clerkships and residency options. They are a great resource when determining what areas/hospitals you may want to explore a little further.


    11. Is there a mentor/advisor system? Who are the advisors—faculty members, other students, or both?

    Every 1st year receives a big brother/sister that they can go to for help, but as I mentioned before, the CPM family is very close and we help each other out. Each student doesn’t have an assigned advisor, but you could always approach a faculty member and see if they could be your mentor/advisor. All of our faculty members are more than willing to help. Students can really approach any of the other upperclassmen for help as well.

    12. How diverse is the student body? Are there support services or organizations for ethnic minorities and women?
    We have a very diverse student body. Students at our school can range from 20 year old to 40+ year old. We have students that are single, in relationships, engaged, married, and married with kids. We have students from various ethnic backgrounds from Caucasian, Hispanic, Asian, African American etc. Traditionally, we have had more men than women in recent classes.

    In terms of organizations present at school, we have AAWP (American Association of Women Podiatrist) and SNPMA (Student National Podiatric Medical Association) which is minority organization but we have it open to the whole student body.


    Facilities
    13. Tell me about the library and extracurricular facilities (i.e., housing and athletic/recreational facilities).

    Library:
    The library may look small, but it contains everything/anything we need. We have hard copies of all the scientific journals (before they became electronic), we have all the podiatric related books plus general medicine books, plus some newspapers and magazines to read during study breaks. At the front desk, we have many things that you can checkout such as laptops, head phones, textbooks for the current classes, radiographs + light box, orthotics, bone models, negative casts etc. I think our greatest assets, when it comes to the library, are Donna and Leo. Leo helps us with any resources we need for basic sciences. Donna, on the other hand, helps us with our clinical sciences. For example, during my 1st externship I was given the title of an article they wanted me to read, but the article was so old that an electronic copy did not exist. I e-mailed Donna that night and the next morning, she scanned the hard-copy of the article and e-mailed it to me, which was amazing!

    The library does have restricted hours of operation, but no fear, KSUCPM has many other locations for you to study that are open as long as the school is. We have two quiet study rooms, six private study rooms (plus three study rooms in the library), one computer lab (might as well be a quiet study room because everybody has laptops nowadays, so rarely are people actually in here), cafeteria, rotunda (randomly placed desks on two floors), multipurpose room, the area outside the multipurpose room etc.

    Also, our library is now part of OhioLINK, which consists of 88 colleges or universities that are able to share items from their library collection. If you need an item from Ohio State University, they can mail it to our library and have it for you in a couple days. This also works for any e-journals or e-books.

    Extracurricular facilities:
    We have a gym area at school but its small and the reason for this is because as KSUCPM students we have free membership to Bally’s (any Bally’s in the country). Usually, students only use the gym at school during exam weeks when they are already at school studying. Both the men’s and women’s locker-rooms have saunas. Besides the gym we also have a walking path. There is another area on campus where the students usually set up a volleyball net. We usually use that area for games or for picnics/ BBQs. We had a huge flag football tournament in the field last year!

    Housing:
    Currently, there is no housing on the CPM campus because the city of Independence doesn’t allow temporary housing (no apartments or dorm style living). However, there are many places to live close to school. There are plenty of apartment complexes within 15-20 minutes of campus. Most students will reside in North Royalton, Parma, Parma Heights, Independence, or Brecksville.

    There are also other apartment complexes that are a little bit (25-30 minutes) further from school. There are also plenty of options for students who want to live in the city of Cleveland or downtown.

    KSUCPM will provide you with a full list of housing options if you are invited to interview. Many of the options also offer a discounted because you are medical student.

    14. Are there computer facilities available to students? Are they integrated into the curriculum/learning?

    We have two computer labs on campus (One of the labs is located in the library). Technology plays a big part in our curriculum. All of our lectures are recorded through a program called media site. Mediasite captures both audio and visual. The lectures are uploaded online so that you can access the lectures anywhere you want as long as you have internet. We also record the demonstration at the beginning of every anatomy lab session so students can view it at a later date. The Anatomy lab also features touch screen computers so that you can pull up atlases while dissecting.

    All of our classrooms have a touch screen/ tablet computer for the professors so that they can write or draw on the screen/slide and mediasite will capture it as part of the lecture that is posted online.

    Besides our lectures, all of our exams are computerized in order to help students become familiar with the computer system used in Part 1 boards. Because the exams are computerized, every student must have a laptop when starting at KSUCPM. We also have computerized clinical cases in our 2nd year. So as you can see, technology is a big part of KSUCPM.

    15. What type of clinical sites—ambulatory, private preceptors, private hospitals, rural settings—are available or required for clerkships? Does this school allow for students to do rotations at other institutions or internationally?
    The requirements for clerkships are quite simple. Your 4th year, you have 6 months of core rotation and 6 electives. Every year, AACPM releases a clerkship handbook that lists all the programs in the country that are participating/accepting clerks for the following year. This is the list from which you choose your electives. As far as I know, I do not believe that there are any international programs available for clerkships. If you are seeking an International opportunity, you may want to meet with the Dean to determine if that is an option.

    The school requires that you participate in a minimum of 5 electives, one of which must be a private practice. Any program with at least 50% clinic can be used as a private practice program. Students have the choice to take 1 month “off” if they choose to but they can only take off a month that they are scheduled to have an elective. They cannot take off a core rotation month. We have many types of rotation that will give students experiences in private practices, clinics, and hospitals.

    16. Is a car necessary for clinical rotations? Is parking a problem?
    A car is a MUST for rotations because we are in clinics all over the Cleveland area. Some students do carpool with each other when possible. Parking is rarely a problem. Our school clinics have their own parking lot and all of the local hospitals offer plenty of parking.

    Financial Aid
    17. What is the current tuition and fees? Is this expected to increase yearly? If so, at what rate?

    Currently, the tuition is $32,000. Fees include student activities fee, health services fee, lab fees, vaccination fees, and books, supplies and instruments. The fees total around $3,900.

    18. Are there stable levels of federal financial aid and substantial amounts of university/endowment aid available to students?

    The Office of Financial Aid at KSUCPM understands your concern in financing a podiatric medical education. Given the increasing educational costs, unless you are fortunate enough to have adequate family resources, it is likely you will acquire sizable loan obligations. Our Financial Aid staff works closely with prospective and current students to ensure eligibility for the best packaging of available funds.

    In addition, KSUCPM will award $600,000 in scholarships annually to prospective and current students.

    19. Are there students who have an "unmet need" factor in their budget? If so, where do these students come up with the extra funds?

    Typically, KSUCPM will make every effort to fulfill the need of a student by reviewing his or her financial situation individually.

    20. Are spouses and dependents/children covered in a student's budget?

    Neither spouses nor children are included in a student’s financial aid budget.

    21. Is someone available to assist students with budgeting and financial planning?

    We do have an office of Financial Aid to help assist you when determining how much financial assistance you will need. In addition, this office is available to help you with any emergency financial situations, such as an unexpected car repair.

    22. Does this school provide guidance to its students, and to its graduates/alumni, on debt management?

    Not that I am aware of.

    Student Involvement
    23. What school committees (e.g., curriculum committee) have student representation?

    Moving forward as Kent State, I do not know what committees will have student representation.


    24. Are students involved in (required or voluntary) community service?

    Community service is voluntary. There are a few organizations, such as SPARCY, that help local school by tutoring their students. Our Sports Medicine organizations also volunteer at local race by putting up a foot aid station. Our Diabetes organization volunteers in the organization of the diabetes walk held every year in Cleveland. Each class also participates in fundraising opportunities and food drives throughout the year.

    25. How active is the Student Council/Government? Are there other student organizations?

    The student government is very active and is the head of all the other organizations at KSUCPM. We have a diverse range of organizations, from academic to sports-oriented clubs. We have a few sports teams, including basketball, softball, and soccer. We have an organization for every interest you may have. We have AAWP (Women Podiatrist Group), SNPMA (Minorities in Podiatry Group), PAD (Diabetes in Podiatry), ACFAS/ASPS (Surgery Club), ACFOAM (Orthopedics Group), AAPPM (Podiatric Practice Management Group), KTE (Academic Fraternity), APMSA (Political), Class officers, Sports Medicine, ASPD (Podiatric Dermatology), and Yearbook, just to name a few.

    Policies
    26. Is there an established protocol for dealing with student exposure to infectious diseases? Is disability insurance provided to cover this exposure?

    There is a protocol for students who may have been exposed to an infectious disease. A student will report the incident to KSUCPM/Chair of the Department of General Medicine to determine the best course of treatment.

    27. Does this school provide, or does the student pay for, vaccinations against Hepatitis B or prophylactic AZT treatment in case of a needle-stick or accident?

    Students receive Hepatitis B vaccinations when students arrive on campus. All students must be up to date on all immunizations prior to starting school. Should a student receive a needle-stick, a student’s insurance should cover the treatment.

    28. Is there a school Honor Code? Is there a grievance process/procedure? Are the students involved?

    Yes, it is noted in the student handbook.

    Residency
    29. May I see a list of residency programs to which this school's recent graduates were accepted?

    Please refer to the below links from the KSUCPM website.
    Class of 2012 Residency Placement
    Class of 2011 Residency Placement
    Class of 2010 Residency Placement


    Questions to Ask Yourself
    30. Does this school have strengths in the type of podiatric medicine (primary care versus surgery versus biomechanics versus sports medicine) that I will want to practice?

    In order to answer this question, I will have to assume that you are taking into account all of our core rotations during the 4th year. Based on this, I would say that our strengths are primary care and biomechanics, but depending on what you choose for your Senior Medicine rotation, you can also add wound care to the list. I think our clinics touch on all types of podiatric medicine: primary care, diabetic foot care, biomechanics, sports medicine and pediatrics.

    31. Would I be happy at this school (for at least the next four years)?

    You will be happy if you are open to new experiences and opportunities and have a positive outlook. When it comes to school, as soon as you step into the school, you are going to become a part of KSUCPM family, where we look out for each other. I have been with the same group of students for four years and I couldn’t ask for a better class to be a part of. I have found some amazing friends at this school and gained a phenomenal support system when it comes to my friends, staff, and faculty.

    I would be lying if I didn’t say there were some times when I was completely overwhelmed and struggling- and you will have those occasions too- at any school you elect to attend. I mean, just think about all the exams, clinics, and stress we are put under, we are going to crack under that much pressure sometime and that’s normal. This is what your support system is there for.

    I know that Cleveland is known as the “mistake by the lake” but all I can say is that every city has unique things about it and you have to find it. I am local and I have found everything in Cleveland that I need to live happily here.

    When I was interviewing at KSUCPM (it was OCPM at that time), the administration spoke to us at the beginning of the day and told us that during our tour we should try to imagine ourselves walking these halls, imagine ourselves hanging outside on the lawn with our friends, imagine ourselves in the classrooms and lab, to pretty much imagine ourselves in this school. They said that if you could easily imagine ourselves there, then that’s probably where we belonged.
  29. pacpod

    pacpod Who Dey! Staff Member Administrator SDN Senior Moderator Gold Donor

    Joined:
    02.08.10
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    1,142
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Podiatrist SDN Published Author SDN 2+ Year Member
    Hey all, feel free to edit the school you attend to bring these up to date. :)

    Curriculum
    1. Are there any special programs for which this podiatric medical school is noted?*

    - 1st year is completely integrated with DO program, 2nd year is integrated with pharmacology. The entire 4th year is spent doing clerkships away from the University. The school is completely wireless and laptops/handhelds are provided. All logs are electronic.

    2. Describe this school's curriculum in the pre-clinical and clinical years. Are there any innovations, like Problem-Based Learning?*
    - 1st - basic sciences, 2nd - systems, lower limb anatomy, principles of podiatric medicine, podiatric surgery and biomechanics, 3rd - clinic, LE dermatology, trauma, community health, and problem-based learning academic rotations (done alongside rotations with DMU and area docs) including: infectious disease, internal med, vascular surgery, forefoot surgery, community podiatric rotation, LE radiology/oncology, rearfoot surgery and reconstruction, 4th – Up to 8 off site rotations completely up to the student before residency interviews.

    3. Are there opportunities for students to design, conduct, and publish their own research?
    - YES

    4. Is there a note-taking service? If so, is it university-run or student-run?
    - Note-pool is student run and completely electronic

    5. Is there flexibility in the coursework (the number of electives) and the timing of the courses (accelerating, decelerating, and time off) during the pre-clinical and clinical years?*
    - No, everyone takes the required classes. There are a few electives available to take during your first and second year (problem based biochemistry/anatomy, cranial nerves elective, etc)

    6. Has this podiatric medical school, or any of its clinical departments, been on probation or had its accreditation revoked?*
    -Never*

    7. How do students from this podiatric medical school perform on the National Board Examinations? How does the school assist students who do not pass?*
    - 1st time pass rate consistently above 90% (100% last year).*

    Evaluations
    8. How are students evaluated academically? How are clinical evaluations performed?
    *- Academically: students must have 70% or above to pass. Clinically: evaluated on each clinical skill and must get at least a 2 (on scale of 4).*

    9. Is there a formal mechanism in place for students to evaluate their professors and attending physicians? What changes have been made recently as a result of this feedback?*
    - Students are randomly selected to evaluate each course and those who want to can evaluate any course. Clinicians are evaluated as students rotate through. Courses are reformed yearly according to student input.*

    Counseling/Student Support
    10. What kind of academic, personal, financial, and career counseling is available to students? Are these services also offered to their spouses and dependents/children?-
    All types of counseling are available at no charge through the school. The Spousal Support Association (SSA) is an organization completely run by those who have significant others in the programs at the medical school.*

    11. Is there a mentor/advisor system? Who are the advisors—faculty members, other students, or both?*
    -Big brother/sister program for 1st years, each student has a faculty (DPM) advisor.*

    12. How diverse is the student body? Are there support services or organizations for ethnic minorities and women?*
    -As diverse as any place is in the midwest! There are support services and organizations for ethnic minorities and women.

    Facilities
    13. Tell me about the library and extracurricular facilities (i.e., housing and athletic/recreational facilities).*

    -Probably the best facilities of all of the podiatry schools. Huge, new library with many study rooms and access to all medical media, collegiate size basketball court, large locker rooms, aerobics room, indoor track, free weights, machines, and treadmills, elipticals, etc with personal flatscreen TV's (cable).*

    14. Are there computer facilities available to students? Are they integrated into the curriculum/learning?*
    -Each student given laptop at the start of their four years and now will get an iPad toward the middle of the second year. Campus is fully wireless.

    15. What type of clinical sites—ambulatory, private preceptors, private hospitals, rural settings—are available or required for clerkships? Does this school allow for students to do rotations at other institutions or internationally?*
    - private practice, county and VA hospital rotation, rural hospital rotations available and required 3rd year. 4th year students are required to do a 3 month core, 1 month private practice, 1 month IM and the rest is COMPLETELY up to them.

    16. Is a car necessary for clinical rotations? Is parking a problem?*
    - Car is necessary for 4th year, parking not a problem.

    Financial Aid
    17. What is the current tuition and fees? Is this expected to increase yearly? If so, at what rate?*

    -Check website for this.

    18. Are there stable levels of federal financial aid and substantial amounts of university/endowment aid available to students?*
    - Stafford loans used by students, many scholarships given throughout 4 years

    19. Are there students who have an "unmet need" factor in their budget? If so, where do these students come up with the extra funds?*
    - Don't know

    20. Are spouses and dependents/children covered in a student's budget?*
    - Not really but I have a wife and things have been fine.

    21. Is someone available to assist students with budgeting and financial planning?
    - Yes

    22. Does this school provide guidance to its students, and to its graduates/alumni, on debt management?*
    -Yes, they bring in tons of speakers about this and give students lunch to come and listen!

    Student Involvement
    23. What school committees (e.g., curriculum committee) have student representation?*
    - Podiatry is represented on all counsels and committees by students.

    24. Are students involved in (required or voluntary) community service?*
    - Voluntary. Last year, quite a few students did the national special olympics

    25. How active is the Student Council/Government? Are there other student organizations?
    - Very active student government. There are a lot of student clubs.*

    Policies
    26. Is there an established protocol for dealing with student exposure to infectious diseases? Is disability insurance provided to cover this exposure?

    Yes, I think so. I had a few students in my group that cut or poked themselves and everything was taken care of.

    27. Does this school provide, or does the student pay for, vaccinations against Hepatitis B or prophylactic AZT treatment in case of a needle-stick or accident?
    - We must all be current on immunizations before starting school. I think they do cover prophylactic treatments because of an injury sustained in clinic.*

    28. Is there a school Honor Code? Is there a grievance process/procedure? Are the students involved?
    - Honor codes are posted in every classroom and signed by the students in those classrooms. there is a grievance process that students are involved in.

    Residency
    29. May I see a list of residency programs to which this school's recent graduates were accepted?*
    2012 graduates residency placement site

    DVA Central Alabama Healthcare System - Montgomery, AL
    DVA Phoenix - Phoenix, AZ
    DVA Loma Linda - Loma Linda, CA
    Surgical Hospital of Oklahoma - Oklahoma City, OK
    DVA Eastern Colorado Health Care - Denver, CO
    North Colorado Medical Center - Greeley, CO
    Yale/VA Health Care Podiatric Residency Program - West Haven, CT
    St. Francis Hospital & Medical Center - Hartford, CT
    Aventura Hospital - Aventura, FL
    Florida Hospital East Orlando - Orlando, FL
    Shands Jacksonville Medical Center - Jacksonville, FL
    Dekalb Medical Center - Decatur, GA
    Iowa Health Des Moines - Des Moines, IA
    Trinity Regional Hospital - Ft. Dodge, IA
    St. Joseph Hospital - Chicago, IL
    Weiss Memorial Hospital - Chicago, IL
    St. Vincent Hospital - Indianapolis, IN
    Mount Auburn Hospital - Cambridge, MA
    Detroit Medical Center - Detroit, MI
    Oakwood Annapolis Hospital - Wayne, MI
    St. John Hospital & Medical Center - Detroit, MI
    Health Partners Institute/Regions Hospital - St. Paul, MN
    Mercy Hospital - Coon Rapids, MN
    DePaul Health Center - Bridgeton, MO
    University Hospital/UMDNJ - Newark, NJ
    Catholic Health System/Sisters of Charity - Buffalo, NY
    Kingston Hospital - Kingston, NY
    Grant Medical Center - Columbus, OH
    Jewish Hospital of Cincinnati - Cincinnati, OH
    Legacy Health/Kaiser Permanente - Portland, OR
    Hahnemann University Hospital - Philadelphia, PA
    St. Luke’s Hospital – Allentown Campus - Allentown, PA
    University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Mercy - Pittsburgh, PA
    Western Pennsylvania Hospital - Pittsburgh, PA
    DVA Mountain Home - Mountain Home, TN
    John Peter Smith Hospital - Ft. Worth, TX
    Hunt Regional Medical Center - Greenville, TX
    Scott & White Memorial Hospital - Temple, TX
    University General Hospital - Houston, TX
    Franciscan Health System/St. Francis Hosp - Federal Way, WA
    DVA Madison - Madison, WI
    Gunderson Lutheran Medical Foundation - La Crosse, WI



    Questions to Ask Yourself
    30. Does this school have strengths in the type of podiatric medicine (primary care versus surgery versus biomechanics versus sports medicine) that I will want to practice?

    31. Would I be happy at this school (for at least the next four years)?

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