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SLP vs AuD??

Discussion in 'Audiology [ Au.D ]' started by StudentMama, Jan 26, 2012.

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  1. StudentMama

    StudentMama

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    Hi, all. I have my B.A. in English, and now I'm a post-bac student finishing a year of pre-req courses in order to apply for Masters in SLP, but now I'm considering AuD. I have done tons of research about both, but I'm hoping you all might have some thoughts I haven't considered. I'm a little intimidated by all the math and science in audiology, so that's why I originally decided to go with SLP. Audiology program takes longer, but I think I might enjoy the work better. The pay is about the same from what I can tell.
    Any thoughts on comparing the two careers??
  2. mercyme

    mercyme

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    Hello honey
    based on my personal experience and many others ( some never speak out) i am telling you now to step back and dont enter either of these two worlds. if this is only two worlds you know of then SLP is better for career opportunities also you will not walk around with a Dr (that too psuedo) feel that ENT dont care a damn about us... or even worse like a car tech test test test ....

    My recommendation based on your undergrad degree (English) which is another wasted degree with no useful benfit, you should go for PT or OT or something like that which plenty a dime and Dr and others have super billing ability therefore more jobs even in timbaktu
    :love::love:

    so my dear, think twice before audiology do not fall for promises. I know there will be several tigers out there who run to chomp me down. but if you are wanting some money (wall street mentality) head out and re-search your options.

    But yes, sorry to say that you an not so useful degree under your belt anyway.
  3. StudentMama

    StudentMama

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    WTF? Are you for real? Were you drunk when you wrote this? Your insults are couched in run-on sentences, incomplete thoughts, and numerous typos. Even someone without a useless degree in English would have a difficult time deciphering your response.
    Anyone have anything useful to say? I'll check back in a few days. If all the people on the forum are like this, then I'm definitely not going to bother reading more anonymous, cyber-bulling type of abrasive nonsense.
  4. MIAYO

    MIAYO

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    What? are you seriously insulting his degree choice? I hope you get banned. Non-traditional majors add a lot to any field.
  5. MIAYO

    MIAYO

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    We are not all like this, and I hope you do come back. Sorry I can't give any useful information on the two fields you are asking about. I simply don't know enough.
  6. BigAl

    BigAl Year III... Still Lost

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    Someone had a bit much of the wacky tabacky. If you have nothing to contribute other than insults, please take the step off the nearest cliff, good bye

    Anyways...

    Studentmama, the best advise I can give you is to go observer both SLP and AUD in several different settings. Each setting is different, and the approach that is taken in each setting differs as well. Your concern about math and science is one that many have, but it is not something you should be afraid of. The math is actually fairly simple and nothing complex, the science you will encounter in both SLP and AUD and if you find an effective way of grasping the overall ideas you should be fine.

    I started undergrad going into SLP, but along the way decided to go in to AUD. I look back at the time I decided and one of several factors made my decision. AUD offered me immediate results, and steps I would take for treating the problem. Where as with SLP it takes time to see whether your treatment is working or not. This of course is a watered down explanation, but it depends on your personality I believe. My suggestions and I would think most would agree, is to go and observe different settings. Most SLPs and AUDs don't mind have someone observe them, and will always give their input. Hope this helps. If you have any other questions feel free to post here or contact directly.
  7. KCO47

    KCO47

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    Studentmama- I was caught between the two degrees at one point. I can't tell you what you should do, but I'll tell you what I did. I finished my SLP coursework and before I decided on a grad program, I took a job as an SLPA for a semester. I went through a staffing company. The position was in the middle of nowhere, but the pay was pretty decent. By the end of that semester, I was 100% sure that I wanted to pursue audiology. I think that if I hadn't sampled SLP life, I might have always wondered. Maybe you could complete the prerequisites and give it a try before you invest a little piece of your soul into a program :).

    There are a few questions to ask yourself. The first one that comes to mind for me is, how long are you willing to wait for progress? Keep my bias in mind as you read this, of course. Progress in speech-language disorders can be variable, agonizingly slow, and hard to quantify objectively. It takes a patient person. I'm too hooked on the instant gratification in audiology to go back to that.

    This is a huge decision for you and there is a lot to consider. Keep an open mind. Don't let math and science scare you off! I don't feel like we do THAT much more than the SLP kids, really.
  8. StudentMama

    StudentMama

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    Thank you for the replies! You guys pinpointed what it was that was attracting me more to audiology that I couldn't quite put my finger on. I feel like SLP is more subjective, and audiologists have a bit more of a clear plan for treatment and diagnosis. I've observed SLP's that work with kids in school, and elderly in nursing homes; so I think if I can find two audiologists to shadow I should have a fair comparison.
  9. SLP

    SLP

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    First things first - Shadow both in different settings for at least 40+ hours, you absolutely cannot make a decision before you do this, these are my personal opinions, please other posters dont turn this into a **** fest

    My 2 cents

    SLP
    - You get your degree after 2 years
    - Specialties - Stuttering/Fluency, Voice, Accent Modificaiton, Stroke/Aphasia, AAC Devices, Pediatric, Dysphagia/Swallowing
    - Pay is absolutely terrible in public school districts, Pay is very good in hospitals, Pay is amazing in nursing homes and contract agencys.
    - Pay is hourly (except for public schools), which is good since you never work for free on overtime!
    - Job opportunities all over the place, look on simplyhired, indeed, monster, at any given time there is thousands of job openings
    - Both objective and subjective, more subjective though which can be annoying
    - You get to know your patients very well


    AuD
    - You get your degree after 4 Years (there are 2 schools that have a 3 year program, Northwestern and Indiana Bloomington)
    - Specialities - General Hearing Loss & Balance, IOM, Cochlear Implants
    - Pay is all over the map even in the same region/zip code, you might make 55k at an ent or 90k at an ent across the street, there is no standard pay even in the same area
    - Pay is 99% salary, unless you get a production/HA bonus, or you own your practice
    - Job oppenings are there, but you may have to move a large distance to find the job that you meets your needs, there are very few audiologists retiring every year.
    - Very objective, not much subjectivity, very clear path of diagnosis and treatment
    - You see your patients usually 1-2,3 times a year generally
    - You have to be a salesperson in AuD, there is no way around it,
    - People can return hearing aids, people do not want to pay for hearing aids,
    - insurance rarely covers or pays very little for AuD diagnostic procedures or hearing aids



    Personally I got into comm dis field for audiology, it was very interesting and I could see doing it for the rest of my life, but after I found out that the pay is all over the place, the extra 2 years of schooling, and the sales aspect (if I wanted to sell stuff I would have been a business major), I was not interested anymore

    In the AuD, you get a clinical doctorate, you are not and will not become a Doctor/Physician, there are many fields that now have a clinical doctorate (nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy), the sooner you get away from this fact the better you will understand why all AuD's are not making over $100,000 standard everywhere, you not an MD, there is money to be made, but that is all up to you and how you market and run your business, many AuD's make over $150,000. But that is NOT the norm. I know many SLP's in private practice who make 100k to 150k, It is NOT the norm.

    Im from Boynton Beach FL, zipcode 33472
    Salary.com
    AuD median salary = $68,147, bottom 10% $56,214, top 90% $80,131
    SLP median salary = $68,138, bottom 10% $57,505, top 90% $79,689

    If you are going off these numbers, they are pretty much the SAME ... but AuD is 2 more years of school for the same avg pay, personally I wouldent really rely on salary.com since its widely known that its not accurate and very skewed, most of what I know is from shadowing and straight up asking people how much they make, or you can say "what is the general pay like"? And always ask "Are you happy"?, "Would you recommend me getting into this field"?

    If they say no or hell no, ASK WHY???....You will need to know.... Some of their reasons are in their control (****ty business managment, time managment, bad marketing, or they have no idea what their doing), some are not in their control (competition other slps or aud in their area, hearing aid dispensers, costco, walmart, etc, insurance reinbursments goin down or not covering at all)

    I have shadowed both slps and auds and asked them the same questions, in the end.I felt SLP was the safer bet, the standard average pay was more consistant from the people I talked to all over florida, and the staffing contract agencys I called, there are jobs out the wazoo in every area code, and there were many things to get into, so if you get bored with fluency you can change to voice, then to stroke, then to pediatrics, etc... In AuD theres not much to move around into except for IOM which can be difficult to get into.

    Lets be honest, both can be pretty boring, slp doing articulation and language therapy on kids all day can get pretty bleh, same deal with an AuD doing audiograms, tymps on elderly all day.

    I think many people on this forum can agree and disagree with many things I have listed, in the end it is up to you to pick what you like more. SHADOW SHADOW SHADOW!

    Hope this helped

    Thanks
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012
  10. Kitska

    Kitska

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    (Sorry about that troll -- there is a person who is very bitter who keeps coming back to this forum using a variety of screen names. They almost immediately get blocked/banned. I am not sure what they really get out of it for themselves and I seriously wonder if they have a some kind of psychosis.)

    I think a big difference between the two careers is in patient contact. In audiology, you may see a patient only once if they turn out to not have hearing loss, or maybe only a few times if they do have hearing loss but it can be treated by an ENT. For patients who do have hearing loss who you fit with hearing aids, you may see them fairly frequently at first while they are in the process of choosing the hearing aids and getting experience with them, but then only once every 6 months to a year or even less. So overall, bigger caseload in audiology, but less regular contact with the same patient.

    My sense with the SLP career is that you see the same client much more regularly and work towards goals on a weekly basis. There is more lesson planning and preparation involved. I think an advantage is getting to know the patient (client) much better. Personally, I would not like to do all that planning and report writing. Also the client's progress can be so incremental.

    Things you need math/science for in audiology: programming hearing aids and cochlear implants (it is important to understand how the changes you are making affect what these devices are doing), understanding hearing loss pathology (more biology than math), doing electrophysiological testing (ABR, VEMP, etc.), understanding acoustics, to name a few. With that said, good audiologists should also have good counseling skills.
  11. Kitska

    Kitska

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    I whole-heartedly agree about your idea of shadowing! Also, I think the salary information provided is helpful, and it is definiltey true, those two extra years of school do mean 2 years without salary and tuition to pay, which takes a while to make up. But, I think it is more than just about the money, and I don't think either career has to be boring, and I think with any career, you have to love it to do it well and be happy.

    There are lots of ways to be an audiologist, such as

    - educational audiology - work in the schools helping students with hearing loss, making sure they have appropriate accommodations, and training staff
    - cochlear implant audiology - program cochlear implants and help with rehab for those who get them
    - pediatric audiology - work in a children's hospital testing children's hearing (never a dull moment) and work with kids with hearing loss to monitor their hearing, fit their hearing aids or CIs
    - representative for a hearing aid manufacturer - lots of travel, lots of perks. Go visit audiology practices to show them new products and explain how they work.
    - work in an ENT practice testing hearing of patients that come to the ENTs, dispensing hearing aids
    - private practice audiology - you own your own business and dispense hearing aids
    - work at a big hospital -- lots of interesting cases and unusual pathologies
    - vestibular - specialize in testing and treating patients with balance disorders

    This is just a few -- I am sure there are other audiology careers I forgot to list. But it's not really true that intraoperative monitoring is the only other option. In my experience, not all that many audiologists do only that. Some who work in hospitals may do that some of the time, but do other things (diagnostic, hearing aid or CI work) the rest of the time.
  12. SLP

    SLP

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    good info!
  13. TheEarDoc

    TheEarDoc Au.D., CCC-A, F-AAA

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    I love Audiology, but I'll be completely honest with you the pay isn't that great unless you are willing to move. If you are willing to go to a job where the money is then it's a great field. I know of few fields where you can make over 70k in most places and work 40 hours and never be on call.

    Physical therapy - usually on call
    Occupational therapy - usually on call
    Nursing - on call
    PA or Nurse Prac - on call
    Physician - on call
    Speech Language Pathologist - usually on call especially in the hospital setting

    Speech there are oodles of jobs, but from my experience of many friends and family in the field you usually have to work in a nursing home to make good money and they usually have unrealistic expectations for caseloads and try and force you to do some unethical things. Plus how many swallowing evals can you do before you are sick of them? Now if you are geographically bound then speech is going to be a better option job wise because you will find something to pay the bills, but it might not be your dream job. In some states there just aren't enough Audiology job openings to support all the Audiologists so you have to follow the money (think southern states and western states).

    My opinion the best job settings for Audiology are private practice or VA.
    Speech - large hospital or private practice.

    Just my two cents.

    I love audiology a lot more than I ever loved nursing. Most of the docs I work with respect me a lot more than I was respected as a nurse and I don't have to worry about killing someone by giving them the wrong meds when I come to work tired or sick.

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