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Sorry I know this sounds stupid

Discussion in 'Podiatry Students' started by stargyalny, Nov 14, 2005.

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  1. stargyalny

    stargyalny Member

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    I know this sounds stupid but I have been trying to gather information on podiatry and it is quite hard. Do almost all podiatrists open their own practice? I live in New york, does anyone know what is average for DPM?I'm so afraid to graduate from podiatry school and not have a job. Where do you find out about job openings? Please help!..Also when I shadowed a podiatrist he said insurance companies hate podiatrists that they rather their patients go to orthopedics..I thought being a podiatrist you can do orthopedics..I'm so lost..what's the difference? Please help me, I'm a lost soul!
  2. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member Moderator Emeritus

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    IN new york many pods are in private practice. Many are in solo practices. Some are in groups. The trend for the pods coming out of residency now as others have posted is to join a group practice whether with orthopedics or with other podiatrists. There are many reasons people chose to join a practice rather than open one just out of school or even buy someone else's.

    A big reason is student loans. With the amount of money to be paid back it is easier to join a practice that is already thriving and receive a pay check as soon as possible after residency. Starting a practice is just like starting a small business - they almost never make money in the 1st year. You'd have to establish your self. It is possible to start your own practice just out of residency but it would take a lot of planning financially and strategically especially in NY. If you go out to where there are less pods it might take less marketing to make a practice thrive as compared to NYC.

    A reason people might not buy some one else's practice is that it is hard to find a practice that will suit you that is for sale. You inherit all of the patients of the previous DPM and might need to work with them for a while. Usually people hire a lawyer to find out all the details about the practuce you might want to buy.

    I'm sure there is more information that I did not include that others can add to answer your question.

    Talk to as many DPMs as you can before you decide whether this is right for you or not and shaddow them.

    NYCPM can hook you up with Alumni in your area to shaddow.
  3. gsrimport

    gsrimport Senior Member

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    I talked about many health care professionals and the consensus was there were too few podiatrists. If you do your job well and like what you do, your opportunities are not limited.
  4. oncogene

    oncogene Senior Member

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    Hello,

    My question is that if a pod becomes a partner in an orthopedic practice and performs the foot and ankle procedures in that practice, how is the podreimbursed? Will the pod get what an orthopod would get for that procedure like he/she deserves or will they still be reimbursed as a pod? I think that the laws regarding this has t change especially if the trend is to join ortho practices.

    oncogene
  5. IlizaRob

    IlizaRob IlizaRob-erator Moderator Emeritus

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    It depends on the relationship the pod has with the orthopedic practice. Most of the time the pods are salaried and get a pay check so the orthos (or the owners of the practice, some orthos may also be salary) can pay the pod what they want. it would be decided in the contract. Its harder for a pod to become a partner in an ortho group because he/she cannot take a turn on call for general ortho cases. Im not saying it doesnt happen though. If a pod was partner in the group, they would get the same pay as an ortho if the patient is under medicare. Right now the law is in the process of changing for medicaid as well but it is up to the state as far as government reimbursments go. Many insurance plans tend to shadow their reimbusments with medicaid or medicare. Im not completely sure with the politics involved, Im sure Jonwill can correct me if Im wrong.
  6. oncogene

    oncogene Senior Member

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    Correct if I am wrong but, aren't pods reimbursed at 80% of what an orthopod would get for the same procedure under medicare? Thanks.

    oncogene
  7. diabeticfootdr

    diabeticfootdr

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    Come shadow me at my residency program. I'm in NYC. You'll have a different opinion than that of the normal NYC DPM. To the contrary, we're very active surgically and performing a lot of procedures that NO DPM IN NY performs. NY is a horrible place for pods. A lot of this is brought on by the NYCPM. Best place to train and practice podiatric surgery is out of NY.

    PM me if you're interested.

    LCR
  8. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member Moderator Emeritus

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    Please explain how the NYCPM contributes to NY being a horrible place for pods?

    And if NY is so horible for pod training and you went to the so called best pod school why are you training in NYC?
  9. diabeticfootdr

    diabeticfootdr

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    My NY residency program is far from the best in the country. Residency is what you make of it. If you're a self-motivated learner, you can succeed in any residency program.

    I'm not an NYCPM grad, but I was at NYCPM yesterday presenting on our program to students. The school is run down. The flag hanging outside "New York Foot Clinics" is torn, dirty, faded. Horrible 1st impression.

    I went with the Director of our hospital, the other Chief resident, and a resident at our program who was former President of Students at NYCPM.
    I met Drs. Spilken and Trepal. They initially put us in the Pedinol room to present to students. We prepared a nice power point of different surgeries we were doing (Charcot recon, forefoot narrowing, amps, calc. fx). Spilken wanted us to have students "huddle around a computer" and show this to them. We insisted on a room with a projector. We ordered in pizza at noon. 6 students showed up. No faculty attended. I was told students were in clinic and couldn't be released (they're needed to trim toenails to make money for NYCPM).

    If I was representing an out of state residency program, and had to present at NYCPM, I would have been very upset, having to travel for that!! I'll never present there again.

    How NYCPM contributes to "NY podiatry mentality"? . . . .
    The 6 students that showed up were amazed that podiatry isn't about nail fungus and calluses. The NY scope of practice is the 2nd worst in the entire country!!! NYCPM does nothing to advance this. NYCPM clinics has been implicated (if not settled) several medicaid fraud cases in the past 30 years. This is why DPMs are not allowed on medicaid in NY. Why should NY state gov. want DPM providers when what is supposed to be the "pinnacle of podiatric education" in NY was fraudulent.

    Why do podiatrists in NYC do "house calls" to trim peoples nails? (and bill medicare) Give me a break!!! How do you look at yourself in the mirror everyday and call yourself a doctor. They're nothing more than technicians. This is rare in other parts of the country (I've never heard of it before moving to NYC).

    Walking around the halls of NYCPM, I saw former research poster presentations (none more recent than 2 years). Onychomycosis, skin dryness, bunion evaluation . . . were topics.

    My main complaint is that they do nothing to advance the profession in NY.

    But why should they? . . . NYCPM is the only private DPM school in the US. That means they're not a part of any University system and there is no one academic/ethical board looking over Levine or Trepal's shoulders.

    Lee C. Rogers, D.P.M.
  10. stargyalny

    stargyalny Member

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    So it would def be a bad choice going to nycpm?
  11. dpmgrad

    dpmgrad Senior Member

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    I just wanted to comment on Dr. Rogers' experience on presenting his residency program to NYCPM students. I had a similar experience when I went back to NYC to present my out of town residency program to NYCPM students last year. I was given a time by NYCPM administration and was told that it would be a good time for the students to come by to check out the residency presentation. I only had a couple of students showed up to my residency presentation since most of them were still stuck in clinic. I figured that we did not get a lot of students because my residency program was outside of NYC and we did not provide food. But, I am shock to hear that you had similiar response from NYCPM students even when your residency program is in NYC (a three year surgical program) and you had provided food. After that experience, my residency program had decided not to do any more recruitment at NYCPM since it was not worth the time and effort.
  12. jad

    jad New Member

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    Do not worry about what other people are saying about podiatry. there are a lot of naysayers. Podiatry is a great profession with many opportunities for a hard worker. Insurance companies can not hate what they do not fully understand. part of this disconnect is the fact that the profession is very small and has not got its message out to a wide enough base. If you do your work and get good grades you will get a great residency no matter where you go to school. If you work hard in residency then i have no doubt you will have a job offer before you finish your program.
    many people are forming podiatry groups so that they can all have the benefits of a practice but without sacrificing their entire lives. I hope this helps and always remeber to get many different opinions. you can not pin you hopes and dreams on one persons view to make your own.
  13. stargyalny

    stargyalny Member

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    Thank you..ur are so right..if u get good grades i dont see what could go wrong
  14. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member Moderator Emeritus

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    As a student at NYCPM I want to say that Dr. Rogers is not 100% correct in his post. I do not know how he could know all that information from a 2 hour visit to the school unless he had a little birdy wispering in his ear.

    I am curious what Dr. Rogers has to gain from trash talking NYCPM. I would never tell anyone that NYCPM is perfect but I would and do encourage perspective students to visit NYCPM and decide for themselves if it is the right place for them.

    To correct some of the false statments that Dr. Rogers made:

    1. we do not just chip and clip nails and calluses. That is one of the rotations in the clinic - primary podiatric medicine. That rotation also includes screening the patients for the first visit and assessing the cheif complaint and sending them to the correct clinic for follow-up (eg: podiatric ortho, vascular, wound care, diabetes clinic, surgery...) All of those other clinics have students rotating thru as well.

    2. The statement that NYCPM contributes to the crappy scope in NY...
    For the past 2 years and continuing this year the entire student body of NYCPM goes to lobby day in Albany (NY capital) to lobby the state congressmen to vote for podiatry issues including, including us in medicaid, increasing the scope, and one that benefited Dr. Rogers fighting for the residents to be able to continue practicing out of scope in NY. Without us he would have had to change residency programs or be resticted to the foot and then maybe even NY for the rest of his career - so Dr. Rogers "You are welcome!"

    3. NYCPM is part of the AACPM and we get acredited like all the other podiatric schools. The CPME comes and visits just like the other schools.

    4. NYCPM is however not part of a medical or osteopathic or nursing school. There are pros and cons to being part of another school. I will not go into that but I do not look at our being separate as a negative.

    5. There are old research posters hanging on the walls, as well as the updated posters. Some of the older ones are from the biochemistry department on grades. We have one that is a year old about antibiotic beads in diabetic ulcers.

    6. the school is in harlem and it is an old building. Sure they could tear down and rebuild - but ask one student if they want to pay higher tuition and be displaced for any amount of time - NO! The clinic and the equipment are updated constantly. In the Clinic we have digital x-rays, dartfish technology, F-scan, and digitized charts in most of the clinic. And as it is great to know how to use the bew technology when the power crashes it is also great to know how to fall back on our clinical tools that are not powered by electricity.
  15. IlizaRob

    IlizaRob IlizaRob-erator Moderator Emeritus

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    Im just curious. Why did NYCPM finally decide to join the aacpm last year after so many years of not being affiliated with them?
  16. diabeticfootdr

    diabeticfootdr

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    To clarify my earlier post:

    From the New York State Medicaid Fraud Control Unit; 2004 Annual Report, Page 25.

    "PODIATRY
    In July 2004, the Unit and DOH reached a $4 million settlement with Foot Clinics of New York
    (FCNY), a nonprofit diagnostic and treatment center in Manhattan.
    In auditing FCNY’s 1991 and 1992 cost and/or statistical reports, Unit auditors determined that there were
    deficiencies in the accounting and bookkeeping systems of FCNY and a related entity, New York College of
    Podiatric Medicine (NYCPM). These deficiencies resulted in improper allocations of costs from FCNY and
    NYCPM’s cost and/or statistical reports, which led to substantial Medicaid overpayments between December 1991
    and September 1999."


    4 million dollars!! If the tuition is $25,000 a year, that 160 students tuition for 1 year that will have to go to pay the NY State Gov for "overbilling". Perhaps that's why the school can't afford renovations, or a new flag outside.
  17. diabeticfootdr

    diabeticfootdr

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    Great!! Then you can trim toenails by flashlight.
  18. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member Moderator Emeritus

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    actually I prefer debriding calluses to cutting nails.
  19. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member Moderator Emeritus

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    They say they withdrew from the AACPM because it was alot of money to be a member and they did not feel they got any benefits from it.

    After several years both the students and the admins felt it would be best to rejoin because of a situation with the residency interview weekends.
  20. diabeticfootdr

    diabeticfootdr

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    All arguing and joking aside . . .
    you should come visit our program, or at least come to rounds once and we can show you what we're doing.

    My co-chief resident and I gave a lecture last night to NYSPMA/Queens on Charcot Reconstruction with External Fixation. It was a great turnout 60-70 people (a few NYCPM students too). It's amazing how you can save these limbs that would otherwise be amputated.

    Lee
  21. Footfxr

    Footfxr Footfxr

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    This is very disturbing information. I can't believe that I completed 4 years at NYCPM and this is the first I'm hearing of this.
  22. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member Moderator Emeritus

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    They only make announcements about vans leaving to Lincoln, metro and draper, not about bad news.

    But don't worry because other hospitals in NYC also have law suits settled for about the same amout for the same reasons. I'm looking for the website...
  23. Footfxr

    Footfxr Footfxr

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    Thanks, Sure many hospitals are wrongly sued and settle, they are also sued for legit reasons and settle. However, fraud is an entirely different animal and is a huge deal. How can you train doctors and expect them to be ethical, when the school they attend is defrauding the government and even worse, the patients they treat. Discraceful. Maybe if the focus was to train doctors and not. Remeber the BS MD program in the carribean.... What a farse.... Let's train better DPMs. hmmmmm...... Just my opinions. If you have the opporunity and motivation, visit the Iowa program. Now there is a model school, in my opinion, the standard all DPM programs should aspire. If I did it all over again, I'd be in Iowa.

    Cheers
  24. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member Moderator Emeritus

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    I say all the time if I did it all over again.... but in reality to do it all over again yu'd have to start now not at the same time you originally started DPM school because you know so much more about how the school is now. I'm not sure but I think many of the schools have improved over the past few years.

    Just one more thought. It is very easy to say that you'd go somewhere else and that it is great and so much better but unless you actually went to school there it is hard to know really what it wuld have been like. I don't know what your experience was with DMU so maybe you really do know what it is like?

    I lied I have one more thought. It has been my experience that each year the school is very different depending on the students and how much the students want to put into their education. I agree that the school should foster an educational environment but it is also up to the students to make it the best they can and be active in their own education.

    What about the DMU program is so much better than the other schools?
  25. psionic_blast

    psionic_blast Senior Member

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    Are you just kidding! Just look at the recent years of the board scores after they got the testing problems out of the way. Year after year DMU posts the highest pass rates. Recently they have put a huge number in 3 year residencies and to top it off I bet that it is the most challenging school bar none. I dare say they produce some of the best doctors as of late. It really is a phenomenal school.
  26. stargyalny

    stargyalny Member

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    So NYCPM is a No No? I got a bit suspcious when they accepted me on the spot. :confused:
  27. Footfxr

    Footfxr Footfxr

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    Finally, a very intelligent and evidence based quote.... the proof is in the pudding... DMU has the numbers, you can't deny it.... It's time to take responsibilty, it's time for the schols to shape-up or get out... Let's demand more from our training programs... I do not see the Columbia Medical students and alum debating the quality their training... Wow... Oh wait I think a lecture on coding for onycho is being held in NY tonight..... :laugh:

    My opinion...
  28. Footfxr

    Footfxr Footfxr

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    Ok wait.......

    A pulse
    A college degree from Cracker Jack U
    You're accepted... lol :laugh:

    In reality, all the schools are competing for a very small aplicant pool..... If you are a qualified applicant, then you are very desirable and can easily get in.... it the law of supply and demand... I see the ease of getting into DPM programs eroding as the applicant pools rebound..... get in while you can..... choose wisely young grasshopper......
  29. psionic_blast

    psionic_blast Senior Member

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    It just my opinion, but if I were you I would look into some of the other podiatric medical schools.
  30. shmob

    shmob New Member

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    Just for anyone who might read this thread in the future, I would like to present a students point of view on whether or not you should consider NYCPM.


    As per the previous posts, the administration does have some issues:

    - crappy flag out front
    - some out dated posters on the walls
    - old building
    - previous history of "deficiencies in bookkeeping" when it comes to medicaid billing
    - treating guest presenters poorly
    - students spend too much time "clipping toe nails"

    now let me address these briefly before i move on:

    - crappy flag and old building
    this is NYC, property is RIDICULOUSLY expensive here. while i agree they should take some pride in the facade of the building, i can understand it not being a HUGE, AMAZING complex due to how limited and expensive space is in NYC. While it is expensive, the land is also valuable, and NYCPM has just informed the students that they are in the process of possibly selling the school and clinic buildings and moving to another site in manhattan. the new site would be much newer, bigger, and better than the current buildings we have but that is in the works at the moment. the point is the plan to fix up the building of the place is in the works.


    - out dated posters
    at NYCPM, research mainly depends on the students. I have a few friends in my class doing current research projects, so if you check back you may see thier posters up on the walls sometime in 2006-2007. but for the most part, students opt to focus on clinical learning and classroom work as opposed to doing research projects. Trust me though, at NYCPM there are plenty of opportunites available if you want to research, regardless of what is hanging on the walls. It just takes a person that WANTS to do it.

    - deficient bookkeeping, and treating presenters poorly, clipping too many toe nails
    the administration does have problems, miscommunicatons/scheduling problems being 2 of the worst.

    the fact that the administration has its problems is not only a bad thing for students. It has actually brought us alot closer together as a class. We have learned how to organize and stick up for ourselves, instead of being spoon-fed everything we need. In many cases we have learned what NOT to do, as well as what should be done.

    Clipping toe nails and debriding calluses is actually a fundamental part of footcare for the elderly and diabetic patient. It is ESSENTIAL to be able to do it confidently and accurately. It is done PREVENTATIVELY to avoid ulceration and infection that could lead osteomyelitis and/or loss of limb. anyone who tells you its not important, doesn't know what they are talking about, period. We have 1 rotation that focuses on basic footcare and that rotation lasts 2.5 months. This is HARDLY too much basic foot care because the VAST MAJORITY of podiatrists will NOT have a 100% surgical practice. So if you cant cut toenails fast, and debride calluses quickly and efficiently with out hurting the patient then you are missing one of the fundamental skills of being a podiatrist.

    we have 3 other current rotations during our 3rd year:
    Surgery/OR
    Medicine B - comprised of vascular, woundcare, and radiology
    and
    Orthopedics/Podopediatrics

    all 3 focus on aspects other that clipping toenails

    the clinical experience at NYCPM is INVALUABLE and I highly recommend you check it out and compare it to the other schools clinical experience before you write NYCPM off. You would be missing out.

    The patient population we see at the clinic come in with all types of problems, because they are coming from all types of society. Wealthy and poor, young, old, white, black, hispanic, etc. etc. are all represented here so you get educated on everything. You basically get to see all of podiatry through the rotations, and get to decide what you like, and what you dont.

    I would rather have that, than see the same type of case everyday, and then get out into the real world with my degree and have no idea what do if something crazy comes at me.


    One more thing. I had a friend that transfered OUT of NYCPM, and when i asked him how it was going he said, "transferring out was the worst mistake I ever made." his reasons and the school have to be kept confidential so we dont offend those at his new school, so I say this just to illustrate the fact that:

    No matter where you go, nothing will be perfect. All schools have their rough spots. One school might have an administration that is mean to presenters, and has an ugly flag, while another school might have NO CLINIC for you to work in, and a student body that hates eachother.

    Let me tell you that the student body here at NYCPM is awesome, I couldnt have gotten through my time here with out them. Living these 4 years in NYC has been an invaluable life experience as well.

    SO, in conclusion. If you want a school with friendly student body, a good academic education, a clinic that can show you ALL aspects of podiatry, and to live in NYC or the tri-state area for 4 years. NYCPM is a great the place for you.

    Oh and dont worry about residencies, there are plenty of residency programs for podiatry students, everyone will get one (one of the benefits of our profession :) ). Its nice cuz that way you dont have to kiss "Lee C. Rogers, DPM's" butt.


    Remember, podiatry school in general "is what you make it"

    Good Luck!
  31. IlizaRob

    IlizaRob IlizaRob-erator Moderator Emeritus

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    I read about the financial opportunity that NYCPM has with selling their assets. I think its great that they are considering moving to a better facility in Manhattan. But wouldnt manhattan be more expensive than where you currently are? If yes, is NYCPM just making an investment and will you see an increase in tuition from this? Just curious. Thanks.
  32. psionic_blast

    psionic_blast Senior Member

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    Ya everyone gets a residency right now, but not all will get a three year residency. That is a fact and you can take that to the bank. Dr. Rogers is not a bad guy by the way, and will probably be a leader in our profession so don't be a hater.
  33. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member Moderator Emeritus

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    We already are in Manhattan
  34. IlizaRob

    IlizaRob IlizaRob-erator Moderator Emeritus

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    I guess I should have done my homework. So do you know if the new facilities will cost more than the what the sell will bring in?
  35. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member Moderator Emeritus

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    I wish I knew the answers but the admin is very secretive. We do not even know the location in Manhattan that they are looking at.

    There is an article in some business mag that says the original development company that was going to rent and build a marriott in our parking lot is regrouping and getting a lot more funds and wants to buy the builing and the parking lot.

    It is hard to believe that we could get something for less that what the development company is willing to pay.

    I still like my school. :love:
  36. psionic_blast

    psionic_blast Senior Member

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    I know you love your school and I think that is great. I hope that they build you guys a state of the art facility. I wish the laws were more favorable for podiatry there, but hopefully that will come in time.
  37. 1. "Do almost all podiatrists open their own practice?
    Yes. There are a few jobs in podiatry, but good luck in finding them.
    Now if you asked if almost all podiatrists own their own practice, I'd have to say, maybe the banks own a decent share too..."

    2. "I'm so afraid to graduate from podiatry school and not have a job."
    That's actually pretty decent thinking on your part, I mean, how would it feel to owe 200K and be at the mercy of some opportunist podiatrist who will hire you for 65K? Hmmmm can you say stuck????
    I've read the 120K thing on here a few times and lost my stew! If you know what I mean.... Nothing is set in stone and don't believe everything that you read concerning podiatry salary. The fact is that there is no set salary.
    Remember, if someone is making 120K a year take home but owes 800K+ in debt, is that really a great income? I mean it'll be beans and rice or 30 years to pay that one down!!!!

    3. "Also when I shadowed a podiatrist he said insurance companies hate podiatrists that they rather their patients go to orthopedics"

    Well, no one can blame me for saying this one! It's right from the pod you shadowed!!!! Maybe you should have a little more faith in his word than that of internet podiatry "friends?"

    4. "I thought being a podiatrist you can do orthopedics"
    Dew-dew-dew--dew----dew-dew-dew-dew..... you're entering the podiatry zone....
    Try to get the certifications....check your state laws.... get on staff at a hospital..... get on an insurance plan..... and maybe you too could do all that "fancy" stuff.

    Podiatry, to me, is where allied health meets a big gray area. So many possibilities and outcomes.

    If you're worried now, be warned, those easy loans certainly pile up!!!!

    Good luck my friend.
  38. N4658H

    N4658H Junior Member

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    If only I could be so fortunate to come out of school making 120K and owe 800K to the bank. Anyone with such a sizable loan has probably made a partnered investment in a surgery center or office space which are extremely wise choices if the bank feels your business model is sound. By the way, I am in the midwest, have shadowed four extremely busy and successful podiatrists and know first hand that your estimate of 120K/yr is right on target. By the way, I love beans and rice. Now run along to your litter box, we'll be watching.

    http://www.litterboxcam.com/
  39. doclm

    doclm Senior Member

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    :laugh:

    Is that your cat?
  40. N4658H

    N4658H Junior Member

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    I wish I could take credit, but no. Just internet randomness. Glad you see the humor.
  41. IlizaRob

    IlizaRob IlizaRob-erator Moderator Emeritus

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    Is there anyway we can get this troll banned? What do you say EKR.DPM, efs?
  42. jays2cool4u

    jays2cool4u Senior Member

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    You can't ban someone for expressing their opinions because you don't agree with them. That's almost like censorship.
  43. IlizaRob

    IlizaRob IlizaRob-erator Moderator Emeritus

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    There is a difference between expressing an opinion tastefully with an intent to inform, and doing it with a condescending and disrespectful attitude toward others on the forum. This forum has no room for such characters whom I believe are expressing their "opinions" either with mal-intent or just to amuse themselves at the expense of others. If you notice in other forums, MD vs DO vs DDS threads are closed rather quickly although they are filled with "opinions". This has nothing to do with whether or not I agree with whiskers and everything to do with his presentation!!!!
  44. psionic_blast

    psionic_blast Senior Member

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    Amen. Here *****, *****, whisker nice cat. no bad, Bad, BAD!! cat.
  45. runnersfeet

    runnersfeet Senior Member

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    Hilarious...love the litter box comment! I too know many well known reputable pods who made that 120k within 3 years of being out of residency...and that was even 8-10 years ago for some. Most of them now make well over 200k, and the few that I know who do surgery once a week make near 300k or more. I have yet to meet a Podiatrist who is unhappy with their career - of course they are out there, but it obviously takes a certain level of intelligence to be successful...something Whiskers clearly does not have. By the way, I have seen 8 different pods for my own feet problems in the last 10 years and in two different states. I have also shadowed 3 different pods...all of whom are very respectful and enthusiastic about the profession. So, we all have good reason to be motivated and positive about Podaitry!

  46. N4658H

    N4658H Junior Member

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    I could not agree more. Two years ago I injured my foot and ankle playing ice hockey and went to an MD. He examined me and felt that I should be referred to an expert. Yes, the MD sent me to a DPM. A practice that is becoming increasingly common.
  47. jonwill

    jonwill SDN Senior Moderator Moderator Emeritus

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    There are PLENTY of jobs out there for a well trained pod. The MINORITY of pods now open up their own practice. The majority go with ortho groups, multispecialty groups, or established pod groups.
    Was talking with a friend last night doing his residency in Michigan. The senior resident there just signed on with an ortho group for 150k base salary and a Mercedes Benz. Podiatry is alive and well. Insurance groups LOVE podiatrists (exact words) because compared to other docs, they hardly get sued.
    Those nine lives have to be up by now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  48. BengaliDocIsl

    BengaliDocIsl BaitulMukarram,Bangladesh

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    Thanx guys, hearing all the positive things about being a D.P.M is causing me to want to go the D.P.M route instead of the D.O. or M.D. route. jonwill do you know of any pods who make good money without doing surgery. i don't want to do surgery
  49. Ezj391

    Ezj391 Junior Member

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    I personally know of a podiatrist who does ZERO surgery and makes over $300,000 net. Additionally, he practices in New York (the alleged podiatry wasteland). He did a wound care fellowship and works with many nursing homes as a "wound care consultant" additionally, he knows how to do in-office dispensing really well.
  50. Ezj391

    Ezj391 Junior Member

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    He says the same dribble every time. No need to ban white noise.

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