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This medschool blog really SCARES me!!!

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical Osteopathic [ DO ]' started by ppatel1185, 04.09.08.

  1. ppatel1185

    ppatel1185 Pre-Med Student

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    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    Here is the link:

    http://www.medschoolhell.com/

    Its the first entry. If you click on the word refused in that article, it will take you to another entry which is even scarier in my opinion....

    http://www.medschoolhell.com/2005/12/24/obgyn/


    Please comment!
     
  2. aliDO

    aliDO

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    Doesn't scare me at all. I like to think I have compassion for people.
     
  3. ppatel1185

    ppatel1185 Pre-Med Student

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    I don't understand what this article has to do with compassion for people...All I am pointing to is how easy it is to acquire a highly infectious disease while performing your job/duties... Quite scary if you ask me...
     
  4. eikenhein

    eikenhein

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    Sometimes its hard to feel sympathetic to a patient when their condition is brought on by a long series of poor personal decisions. I think everyone knows that alcohol is not conducive to the health of a growing fetus. I think everyone knows that barrier contraceptives help reduce the risk of sexually transmitted diseases.

    And yet, people continue to do it. Its not that they are incapable of comprehending the consequences, nor are they under duress. It baffles the mind.
     
  5. aliDO

    aliDO

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    It is called mental illness. Many of the people who have sex for crack have mental illnesses along with substance abuse problems. It's not as easy as you seem to think for these people to have normal lifestyles. I've been around it my entire life with my brother who is a schizophrenic. And yes, it does have to do with compassion. These people didn't want to treat people because of flash judgments. They believe they aren't good people because they make bad choices. There will be many people you come into contact with with Hep C and HIV who look and act normal and you'll never even know they have it. Won't bother you a bit. If you have a problem dealing with contagious diseases, I would suggest another occupation. On avoidable. I'll admit, it is a little scary, but if it scares the **** out of you, choose another route.
     
  6. ppatel1185

    ppatel1185 Pre-Med Student

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    Lol...Too late...I have invested too much time and $$...I am sure that after some personal psychological conditioning I will be fine... :)
     
  7. TexasTriathlete

    TexasTriathlete HTFU

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    Hyman Roth didn't complain when Moe Green was killed, because "this is the life we've chosen."

    There are a ton of things out there that can make us extremely sick, and we are going to be exposed to a lot of them as students, residents, and so-on. We just have to be as careful as we can, and still, the possibilty exists that we could catch something that could severely impact us, or even kill us. If we do, remember, this is the life we've chosen.

    And as much as we might hate a given patient's lifestyle, or think he/she is stupid for having any problems that we are asked to treat, the fact remains that we still have to adhere to the standards of care. Ideally, we will treat a nun who does 80 hours of volunteer work a week with the same level of care that we would treat a cokehead who is handcuffed to the trauma stretcher because he stabbed his pregnant girlfriend before getting shot by her, leading to his visit to the hospital.

    The guy who wrote that first blog is not cut out for this job. If you think its all nice cars and golf 4 days a week, you've got another thing coming. There is a lot of risk and a lot of hard work in an environment that, at times, sucks. For me, that's what makes it so great. I love the hospital. I feel at home there.
     
  8. aliDO

    aliDO

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    Greatly written. I feel at home in the hospital too.
     
  9. 189362

    189362

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    whatev. I think that guy is ok. He isnt walking the line like everyone trotting along the patient care is #1 route. Not that I am anti-conformity, but its good to see things from a diff. perspective sometimes. Dont let that scar you. Reality is some Dr.s have that mindset.

    That being said, I def. do not agree.
     
  10. ppatel1185

    ppatel1185 Pre-Med Student

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    This is what I guess I was trying to say...I am not really scared in the sense that I would consider dropping out of medicine...Just wanted to bring this view point into the picture since I have never seen it mentioned before...
     
  11. nascardoc

    nascardoc Daddy to 2 kiddos

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    http://www.medschoolhell.com/2007/04/24/101-things-you-wish-you-knew-before-starting-medical-school/

    Here is a post of his that lists the 101 things you wish you knew before starting medical school. I will tell you the numbers that are true, from my standpoint. I don't know anything about rotations yet since I haven't been on them, but I don't doubt how they are, so I will not be including them in my list.

    #'s: 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 19, 27, 28, 33, 38, 39, 40, 44, 45, 46, 47 (but I loved it), 50, 54, 55, 57, 59, 60, 65, 70, 71, 73, 77, 85, 91

    There you go....I'm sure there are some I skipped, but oh well. Enjoy!
     
  12. scdocusc

    scdocusc

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    the first entry has about 1% general truth to it. I worked for 4 years drawing blood for a job and people get stuck but if you are careful and follow procedure then the chances are not high that you'll get stuck let alone contract HIV or Hep C. Dont let this person scare you.
     
  13. smq123

    smq123 John Singer Sargent Administrator SDN Senior Moderator SDN Advisor

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    It's not that easy to acquire a highly infectious disease, if you just use some caution and (above all) common sense:

    1) Get the Hep B vaccine, and make sure that your titer level is adequate after you complete the vaccine series!!! Making sure that you're immune to Hep B will definitely give you a lot of peace of mind.

    2) If you get stuck with a dirty needle, JUST GO AHEAD AND GET THE HIV PROPHYLACTIC MEDS. You'll be sick as a dog, but at least you'll be able to sleep at night.

    3) Watch where you're putting your hands. Watch how you handle needles. Make sure you use the sharps container properly. Act as if ALL your patients have Hep C - even little old ladies who used to be nuns. It's as simple as that.
     
  14. ppatel1185

    ppatel1185 Pre-Med Student

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    Thanks! I really enjoyed reading that list...I will find out soon enough how much of it's true!
     
  15. TexasTriathlete

    TexasTriathlete HTFU

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    A girl I work with got a needle-stick recently and had to do the anti-retros for a while. She looked like death, but she doesn't have HIV now, so that's nice.
     
  16. ppatel1185

    ppatel1185 Pre-Med Student

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    But it could be that the needle was not contaminated....or were you sure that it was?
     
  17. TexasTriathlete

    TexasTriathlete HTFU

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    I have no idea. I wasn't there.
     
  18. metalmd06

    metalmd06

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    I don't understand why people with attitudes like that go into medicine. You have to accept the fact that you will be treating and working will all sorts of people, no matter how unsavory they may be. You may not like it, but its part of your job. When it comes time for me to inspect some "crack whore's coochie" I'm going to dive into that mess (taking the proper safety precautions, of course) because if I can learn it like that, I can learn it anywhere, anyway and anyhow.
     
  19. tms2

    tms2

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    About the list of things you should know before medical school, i think most of it is actually true. I talked to a lot of my friends who are residents or fellow and they said similar stories. At the same time, i guess this is something that comes along with the lifestyle and criteria of the job. It also depends on the specialty you go into.

    Every career has its ups and down. At least we have the opportunity to try.
     
  20. skier06

    skier06 Senior Member

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    If you get a needle stick and are unsure whether the patient is HIV+, you actually can't require them to be tested, so your best option is just to take the prophylactics.
     
  21. Colbert

    Colbert

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    You drive a car every day, even though you know there's a chance you'll get into a crash. There's nothing you can do where there's no chance of danger. Hell, you could be a firefighter or a police officer. Those people are putting themselves in harms way every single day to benefit society. We have a pretty cushy job in comparison.

    If I could save hundreds of lives I have no problem accepting the risk that maybe, by some freak accident, I could get hurt. It's part of the job, it's why doctors are such bad mammajammas.
     
  22. paramediclizard

    paramediclizard Powder chaser

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  23. scdocusc

    scdocusc

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    I had to draw blood cultures X2 from a lady whacked out on coke, meth, shrooms, LSD, and heroine. She was so figgity it scared the hell out of me so I got really mean and handled it. I know at our hospital we had the option to talk to the doctor to ask for help (sometimes they would give them a drugs to make them go to sleep). I once had a double amputee on meth tell me he'd be the only "no legged"#$%^&er to kick my @##. If you think about that stuff too much in a hopspital then it will eat your mind up.
     
  24. ppatel1185

    ppatel1185 Pre-Med Student

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    Good to know...So what if the patient had HEP C...would there be anything that they could take for that?
     
  25. skier06

    skier06 Senior Member

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    Here's a really good article addressing occupational risk and post-exposure prophylaxis/guidelines for HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5011a1.htm
     
  26. smq123

    smq123 John Singer Sargent Administrator SDN Senior Moderator SDN Advisor

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    So far, no...Hep C is the one that causes the majority of anxiety. But, like I said earlier, just be careful. Be aware of what you're doing with your hands. Don't get sloppy, lazy, or complacent whenever dealing with anything like a needle.

    A little caution, and you'll be fine. There's no reason to avoid doing any and all procedures, or to avoid medicine totally, just because of a possible needle stick.
     
  27. Thantis

    Thantis Insert Custom User Title

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    Reminds me of when I was taking care of a patient about 1-2 years ago. After handling his stool, emptying his foley and cleaning some blood spilled from his IV (which he ripped out of his arm...just "love" when they do that),
    I proceeded to clean everything and him up. At the end of this all, he tells me he has Hep-C with a smirk on his face. I ask him if he told ER when he was being admitted, the nurse or any physician attending to him...the smug [insert expletive] just keeps on smirking and laughs while saying no (blood-work had not come back yet). He had a "mission" to try to infect as many people as possible. Proceeded to notify the nurse and charge, and we had the room designated as Isolation status.

    Ultimately the whole gist of this is to be extra careful and just do your job. In time you learn to determine if someone is out to get the world or not. I have seen several of these fools over the years.
     
  28. Druggernaut

    Druggernaut Lifetime Donor

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    I'm curious how much clinical exposure the guy who runs MedSchoolHell had before he applied to medical school. I'm guessing not nearly enough. Do any of his regular readers know, or is he willing to share that with us here? It doesn't take long to realize that you'll be dealing with people who aren't willing to put in the time for a little common sense preventative care for themselves, who will simultaneously hate you for doing your job and yet demand that you give them the care they need, and that you're going to have to put yourself at some risk from time to time.

    It's a bit off topic, but looking over that website and some of the posts here, I really wish that medical schools posted some sort of requirements as far as real clinical exposure to avoid the 4.0, 40 MCAT applicant who very quickly realizes he's made a mistake but is too far in debt and has committed too much time to turn around now.
     
  29. TexasTriathlete

    TexasTriathlete HTFU

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    When I'm working, I just assume every pt has HIV and Hep C.
     
  30. 71263

    71263 Guest

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    :laugh:

    Is that blog a joke? Was I the only one amused by his irrational fear of needle sticks and crack-whore baby's mommas?

    In all seriousness, and as several people had already mentioned, not only does this guy does not belong in medicine, but he seems like a whiny little bitch. Quite frankly, Im surprised he made it as far as said clerkships. Granted, I couldnt stand OB/gyn either, but I still dont think it was NEARLY as bad as he made it out to be.

    Unfortunately, medical school, as with other decisions you make, is a risk. You never know at the time whether you're making the right choice or not. You just have to go with your gut and hope that youre right. For me, it was right. Certainly not easy, and it certainly had its downs, but I have no regrets.

    Most people who go through medical school end up liking it, at least enough to stay with it until they receive their coveted MD/DO degree. Don't let this loser scare you off.
     
  31. J1515

    J1515 Member

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    I think it's great that naive little pre-meds who volunteered in an ER or were a CNA for 4 years think they can criticize a doctor who has actually gone through all of this. These kids just never stop with their "know-it-all" attitudes.

    Premed:"of course I know I'll be dealing with sick and contagious patients, but I want to help people and dang nabbit that's what I'm going to do!! I'm going to be the bestest doctor in the world and will learn everything there is to learn at every opportunity! If you don't want to be around sick people then find another field. "

    :rolleyes:
     
  32. TexasTriathlete

    TexasTriathlete HTFU

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    I work night shift at the nation's busiset level II trauma center. I have been fortunate enough to not have gotten a needle stick yet, but I know a lot of people who have. Even though I haven't started med school yet, I may have some clue about what I am getting myself into.

    I know I've got a lot to learn but I'm not going into this completely ignorant either.
     
  33. bronx43

    bronx43 Word.

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    It's not an irrational fear of needle sticks and crack-whores. It's just his opinion that medicine is simply not a career in which he finds happiness or fulfillment. Obviously, every profession will have its detractors and supporters, and the blogger is simply a detractor of the medical profession.
    He doesn't belong in medicine, and he's the first to admit it. And since his blog is one about the negatives of medicine, of course he's going to sound like a "whiny little bitch" to you. Why would you be surprised he made it as far as clerkships? It's within the education process of medical school, and the blogger has said that he wants the MD degree for various reasons.
    I'm glad to see that you resort to name-calling whenever someone doesn't agree with your viewpoint. The guy is simply offering an alternative perspective (as another poster said) for all the day-dreaming premeds who believe that the medical profession is nothing but pleasant patients and generous health management organizations. And frankly, if any premed is scared enough to quit the premed path, then he/she shouldn't have been in it in the first place. And there's nothing wrong with giving a student both sides of the story so that he/she can make the best career decision possible.
     
  34. theraball

    theraball Panned

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    Two words: double glove
     
  35. speeter

    speeter OMS-1

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    "so that's nice." Yeah that is a nice perk. Not having HIV and all.
     
  36. 71263

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    Yes, it is an irrational fear. Im not saying that its an illegitimate concern. Of course there is a risk to being stuck by needles. Every physician knows this and keeps it in the back of their minds. When that fear interferes with someone doing their job, then yes, it is irrational.

    Similarly to the crack-whores. Most doctors have disdain for people who neglect their babies during pregnancy. But once again, when that disgust is so great that someone refuses to do their job, then I say it is irrational, as well as unethical.

    I sure as hell wouldnt want a doctor who 'stayed away from procedure and did the bare minimum to pass', would you?

    So he admits that he does not belong in medicine, yet he pursues it anyway for the sake of a degree? Thanks, now I have even less respect for the guy, particularly since he's filling a spot he doesn't want for the right reasons, will in all likelyhood be a terrible doctor who hates his job, and took away a spot from someone who could very well have enjoyed medicine for the sake of medicine. Perhaps an even greater crime would be to his patients, people who come to the help of a guy who dislikes his field and only did the bare minimum for his education.

    Im surprised he made it thus far becase I figured anyone who hated medicine this much would have dropped out within their first 2 yrs. So not only is he a whiny little bitch, but hes also selfish and a hypocrite.

    Its one thing to present a 2nd side of a story. Its something completely different to go around scare-mongering. This blog is full of exaggerations, oversimplifications, and negativity. No matter how much of a hard time you have, I find it extremely hard to believe that this person has NOTHING good to say about medicine and yet still continues to do it.

    If this was some form of sarcasm or a comedic rant, I would be entertained. If the author is in fact being serious, then he needs to stop bitching and get a life.
     
  37. Concubine

    Concubine PDE5 inhibited

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    I think he actually has moved on to do something else. However, I would agree with you: after reading through his blog, I got the impression that he was whiny as well. In fact, if I recall correctly, in several of his rotation evaluations his preceptors label him as just that.

    On a more positive note, if you read through his entire blog there actually is some pretty good information and refreshing alternative viewpoints in his writing.
     
  38. bronx43

    bronx43 Word.

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    Obviously you wouldn't want a doctor who 'stayed away from procedure and did the bare minimum to pass.' Neither would I. And that's why the blogger isn't going to do a residency after he gets his MD. So, if you view your rotations solely as a formality that is part of an educational process, then it's not unethical or irrational to refuse to do a procedure you don't wish to perform or learn. As a medical student, you don't yet have a professional duty to treat these patients.


    Who said he's pursuing the degree to practice? The blogger has stated that he has already a non-medical job lined up after he graduates. It seems perfectly reasonable to me to finish a degree in order to have a competitive advantage (two letters behind your name do make a big difference regardless of whether or not you want to practice), especially after you've already poured in two years of tuition. And as much as you would like to think otherwise, there are plenty of non-compassionate doctors out there. They simply don't voice their opinions like the blogger does, and yet, they continue practicing. At least he isn't one of these hypocritical doctors.

    He never said he hated the science behind medicine. In fact, he enjoyed his first two years in medical school, because he wasn't yet exposed to the bull**** of practicing. And as I stated before, it's reasonable to me for a medical student to continue through graduation, despite not wanting to practice. For one, medical degrees go a long way in the pharmaceutical world.

    This is a personal blog, and what personal blog (especially one that is meant to reflect his disdain for a certain topic) doesn't contain exaggerations, oversimplifications, and negativity? Keep in mind that these are his personal experiences, ones that made him decide against a life in medicine. Whether or not a reader is scared off by this information is up to the reader himself/herself.
     
  39. 71263

    71263 Guest

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    I will admit, I do feel quite relieved that this guy will never be a practicing physician, and the rest of his blog makes more sense given this context.

    I have somewhat more respect for him (still not a whole lot) than I do for those doctors who pursue a residency and put on a facade about caring about patients when they only care about money/lifestyle/perks (Ie, the Bob Kelsos in the world).

    Nevertheless, I do think its a waste of an MD, but to each their own. I dont think he is right to make this website, but he certainly has the right to do so.

    To the OP: If you plan on going to medical school, actually pursuing a residency, and treating patients, then this blog should be taken with a grain (or rather several spoonfuls) of salt.
     
  40. bronx43

    bronx43 Word.

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    I don't understand. Do you have a problem with the way he thinks, or the fact that he shares those thoughts in a blog?
     
  41. arlingtondoc

    arlingtondoc

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    i've been an EMT for 10 years and a paramedic for almost 4 more. I finally got into medical school recently and am still amazed at some of the pre-meds and medical students i encounter. i am amazed at how oblivious they can be at the realities of the profession they just dedicated seven or more years to.

    food for thought. people bleed. people make some really bad decisions. some patients just don't care about themselves(i give the example of a lady that is a drunk, she survived a horrific car accident that killed several other people and what has she done with the gift of life... she calls 911 3 to 5 times a day to go to the hospital because she is drunk or wants attention. if she is sick and admitted she often leaves to go home and call again??? what do you do with her.) are these situations frustrating or hard to deal with of course. but these are the type of patients you will see. honestly who do you think is in the hospital .. the really sick and indigent with a ton of chronic issues.

    i would think that some sort of real life experience should be required for those who want to be a doctor. not office shadowin or ER volunteering where you make beds. you would see some of these patients and be exposed to some of the issues and have a better idea if the real medicine is for you. also you wouldn't waste a med school spot on the kind of angry blogger who wants nothing to do with actually practicing medicine and will never practice.. what a waste....

    thoughts?
     
  42. bryce

    bryce

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    Great, thanks for thread!!!!! I love going to lunch with people like this gentleman... It just re-affirms just how much of an idiot I am prone to being... Especially as it pertains to life.
     
  43. Lamborghini1315

    Lamborghini1315 Sleep deprived

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    oh boy..if that wasn't the case the world wouldn't need doctors hehe Safe practices are preached in hospitals some doctors don't follow it as strictly but you must as a physician for your own safety.
     
  44. Old_Mil

    Old_Mil Senior Member

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    #'s 99, 98, 97, 95, 93, 92, 90, 84, 82, 48, 47, 35, 26, 19
     
  45. sunny08

    sunny08

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    Wow. I loved that list so much I'm thinking of having it laminated and pasted on all of my walls in med school. Also, I'm fairly certain that I'm going to be "highlighter whore." :D I DO love my color-coded, tabulated, and collated notes. OCD, yeah you know me!
     
  46. mastamark

    mastamark Senior Member

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    SDN 7+ Year Member

    I am also a fellow EMSer(7 years as a paramedic + 1 as EMT). I agree with what you are saying for the most part. While there are some things that will still shock me, I feel like I am a little prepared about what to expect out there.

    That whole website seemed a little off to me. There was even an article that was kind of condescending to us future D.O.s.

    http://www.medschoolhell.com/2007/11/29/an-existential-perspective-on-medicine-part-1/

    "Next, I’d like to state in clear and unfortunate terms that I am a recent medical school graduate. I state that so you’ll take me seriously, as I plan to offer several insights about the profession in the coming paragraphs. I’ll also state that I’m not a D.O. or an international medical graduate, thus increasing my status, if you will, even more in your minds. Really though, no offense to my osteopathic colleagues and immigrant/temporary emigrant physicians/physicians-in-training."

    :laugh: Kind of sure of himself huh?
     
  47. Dakayus

    Dakayus

    Joined:
    08.15.07
    Messages:
    164
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    I think his blog is funny and entertaining. I know some patients will be absolute hypocrites, but I can't possibly think of a funnier situation. I love people and it amazes me how some people think.:laugh:
     
  48. MLT2MT2DO

    MLT2MT2DO

    Joined:
    01.21.08
    Messages:
    2,266
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    And this folks is why schools want you to have clinical exposure...


    What retard doesn't know there is a chance to contract diseases life threatning or not, when dealing with direct patient care?

    I really would like to slap this kid for taking somebodies spot in med school that would have gave a flying f' about humanity.
     
  49. Porco Rosso

    Porco Rosso

    Joined:
    04.14.07
    Messages:
    218
    Location:
    TX Longhorns
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    there maybe tons of negatives of going into medicine. i hear it all the time when I tell someone that I will be going to medical school. they ask, "why."

    when you tell them "the usual speech", they blankly stare at you and say something like "good for you."

    What I have realized through everything is you have to be satisfied with what you are doing and not pay attention to all the haters.

    Then you have people who try to compare it to salaries of a doctor vs. other professions. I will hear things like, "its not worth it for all the years of schooling."

    I think these people lack to understand that people who become dr have an innate inner drive that is not easily explainable to "regular" population.
     
  50. bronx43

    bronx43 Word.

    Joined:
    04.22.06
    Messages:
    1,305
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    "An innate inner drive?" Are you serious? I find it rather amusing that alot of medical students have this illusion that the majority of his/her colleagues are philanthropists who rather care for the afflicted than provide a good lifestyle for him/herself. You have to go no further than to look at the lifestyle-friendly nature of the most competitive fields.
    How many medical students have an undying fascination with dermatological diseases? Enough to warrant a 240 average on step 1 for matching? Enough that 40% of matched applicants are AOA?
    How about radiology? In fact, the lack of patient contact is one driving point for this field, not to mention the ridiculously high salary.
    And plastic surgery? I wonder how many lives you're going to save stuffing breasts with silicone and sticking tubes in love handles.
    Talk about naive...
     

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