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WAMC: What Are My Chances

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by Therapist4Chnge, Dec 15, 2009.

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  1. psich

    psich

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    So your cum GPA is around 3.2. What’s your psych GPA? Are the latest A’s and B’s in psychology courses? Have you taken any psychology courses?

    If the adcoms see an upward shift in your grades, that is always a positive sign, especially if your latest grades have been in psychology classes. It’s not uncommon to see students struggle in college, so the only thing IMO that they would want to see is 1) have you learned something positive from this experience, and 2) has the lesson been translated into something substantial (e.g. good grades, etc.)?

    Based on what you’ve shared, you have a good amount of credits left till you graduate. That is a lot of time for you to be able to prove to adcoms that you are serious about psychology and that you demonstrate some knowledge of the field. It appears that you are also aware of what is required to get into a graduate program in psychology, so it’s good that you’ve done your research and know what you’re getting yourself into.

    So, is it too little too late? You really don’t know until you try. Take the time you have to build up your application. Maybe addressing your situation in the personal statement will help.
  2. futureapppsy2

    futureapppsy2 Ed Psych PhD student Moderator Gold Donor

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    One of my professors got into a clinical PhD program with a 3.2 GPA. He applied to 12 programs, was waitlisted at one, and got in off the waitlist. He had high GRE scores and 8 years of post-BA research experience (but only 1 publication, first author), however.

    So... It can be done.
  3. katciao

    katciao

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    Some PhD programs are more flexible than others. If you earn a high general GRE score, let's say 1550, a high subject GRE score, maybe 800+, get a master's degree with close to a 4.0 (preferably at a school that is research-focused, highly esteemed in the psych community), do research for a couple of years, and write well, you will probably get interviews at some competitive (social) PhD programs.

    If you are serious about getting into a PhD program, do everything legal in your power to get all A's until graduation--even if that means washing your professors' cars, babysitting professors' kids in exchange for tutoring from your professors, or hiring an excellent tutor, even if that means $$$, to assist you from now until graduation.

    It's probably a good idea to spend 200+ hours preparing for the general GRE and also spend a lot of time preparing for the subject GRE, even for schools that don't require it, to optimize your GRE scores. Very high scores will make selection committees more convinced that you are extremely capable in this field.

    You will increase your odds by applying to many more schools than average (15+ total?) given that, as some other posters mentioned, the schools are a good "fit."

    Write the most compelling statement of purpose you can, and get several people to review it. "I got low grades because I drank a case of beer every other day for four years" probably won't work. On the contrary, something along the lines of "my whole family was being held hostage and I had to work two jobs to earn money to secure their release while studying business..." that is truthful might be required to sway the committee. (I've seen SOPs somewhat like this!)

    I know some people who had approx. 2.5 GPAs at community colleges and state universities who are now in reputable but not super-competitive counseling PhD programs funding themselves. Some of them are struggling, but that doesn't mean that someone else who had less than stellar grades can't make it and even do so gracefully. Keep in mind that some POIs want Boy Wonder or Girl Wonder (meaning performed superbly and consistently from the time he or she was an infant and still is at 21 or younger)! I've run into a few POIs who will take only this type of applicant. Different professors are different, though, so I wouldn't say getting into a PhD program is impossible with the profile you described.

    Good luck!
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2010
  4. futureapppsy2

    futureapppsy2 Ed Psych PhD student Moderator Gold Donor

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    Only if you can find 15-20 programs that are good research matches.
  5. chasingadream

    chasingadream

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    ok I am going to give katciao the benefit of the doubt and say "bottom dwellers" was just poor word choice on their part. I find that incredibly offensive.

    I have to tell you it's not too late. If this is your dream you can make it happen. I had a a VERY low GPA (there were major factors involved in my early college life) but like you it was on an upward trend (never fs though). I didn't make excuses or address it in my personal statement. I let my CV, accomplishments and letters of rec speak for themselves. People change, grow, and persevere. I took time after school and got research experience at an ivy for a few years, volunteered for clinical work, took classes, rocked the GRE and worked my but off to get publications. I got several interviews at competitive schools with full funding and stipend. I have an acceptance to one of my top choices and still waiting to hear back from a few. I had so many interviews I turned some down.

    You are not going to get in right out of undergrad, but few people do. It does not make you a "bottom dweller." Some people take longer to figure out what they want and how to get there (I would hope someone entering the field of psychology would understand that and not label people failures). Don't let people discourage you. You may not be on an easy path, but everything you do to get yourself into program will only make you appreciate it more and will make you much more prepared when you finally do get there than getting an A in freshman year Spanish. If this is what you REALLY want and you are willing to put in the time and effort you can and will get there. I did.

    Good Luck!
  6. katciao

    katciao

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    To Chasing a Dream, Hopeful PhDs and others: Please, please do not be offended by the terms I used! Absolutely nothing negative was meant--I'm in the category I was referring to. I did not mean the term in sense of "less than worthy." I was thinking in terms of marine biology--as in flounder, or other fish, and mammals that swim or live on the sea floor. They are just as worthy as the fish and mammals that swim in other layers of the ocean. Unfortunately, occasionally, some people who have done very well in academia (I do not include myself here) do not fully realize the value, talent, and intelligence of people who didn't get multiple Latin words put on their diplomas and don't get to be valedictorian. I have the utmost regard for people on this forum and anyone who is pursuing a degree of any kind. Chasing a Dream, congratulations on your acceptance!
  7. Road2PhD

    Road2PhD

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    How do you score "800+" on a subject GRE test? ;)
  8. PrisonPsych

    PrisonPsych

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    The cap on the subject tests changes year to year based on measures of central tendency. Some years the "high" can be like 890. It's rarely less than 840. So the OP actually isn't making up an 800+ score.
  9. hamsterpants

    hamsterpants

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    you actually can go over 800 on the subject test. Funky I know but true.
  10. Road2PhD

    Road2PhD

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    I didn't know that and stand corrected. I thought it was a typo! Obviously, my score was not around an 800!
  11. chasingadream

    chasingadream

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    thanks katciao, glad to hear it. i know how easy it is for things to come off wrong in this media and metaphors can easily get away from you. i just felt i had to speak up for those of us who have had a different path and let people know that you don't have to get an 800+ and a 4.0 GPA if this is really what they want. good luck to you too!
  12. Grif

    Grif Crazy About Psychology

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    That is great to hear! I hope to have a similar success :) My school history is a little spotty and it's taken me a while to get here. Life is interesting sometimes.

    GRE (est, based on practice tests):
    V-698
    Q-490 (working on this!)

    Undergrad GPA so far: 3.65
    Other GPA: 3.03, part of a pre-pharm cert so lots of pharmacology classes etc. Completed the 1yr program, but not part of my BA.

    Relevant course work:
    1 semester of statistics, abnormal psyc, and research methods.
    Some of my course work received "Pass" grades instead of a letter grade (some CLEP/DSST).
    No thesis, but I can opt for a "Liberal Arts Capstone" that involves a research project, presentation and paper.
    Big upward trend, from B-average in 2005 to nearly straight-As now.

    Research experience: No psyc RA experience, but have performed business research for clients as part of my business. So I do research quite a bit, but it's mostly surveying, interviewing, interpreting data, and reading existing pubs. Some of it is related to the psyc field. Lived areas where almost no one wants a pre-bachelor's RA for some reason, and also haven't had much time to pursue it.

    Pubs: No peer-reviewed journal pubs, all are aimed more at consumers. So far most of my printed pubs are unrelated (design, small biz, ecommerce, HCI), but I have quite a few pubs online that are related (outreach, mental health). I have a few printed unrelated pubs, tons of online unrelated pubs, a small nonfiction book, printed guides, yadda yadda hehe. I have two writing projects in the works for Kindle & iPad, one related to psyc and one in small biz sector. Not sure if any of this will help or not.

    Work experience:
    2 years peer counseling and support group
    1 year running a not-for-profit org that provides information to people with specific health & psychology concerns in the GLBT communities. Official since 2009.
    Run/ran businesses in the IT sector.
    Pending tech patents (probably doesn't matter but maybe make me stand out?)

    Letters: No prof-written letters yet. Have clients willing to write LORs on my behalf, have one person who has worked with me in an org.

    Greek: Was in Alpha Gamma Sigma (honor society) for two semesters.

    Applying to PhD and some PsyD programs (Gallaudet, Widener, Princeton).
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2010
  13. buzzworm

    buzzworm

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    Ditto. Looking back on the way I chose schools, I think I would have saved myself a lot of time and money if I had paid closer attention to fit. If you apply to programs that focus at all on research, they'll be much more likely to consider your application if you can convince them that you're interested in what they're studying and that you have a research background to back up that interest.
  14. summerssun

    summerssun

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    So, it's looking like I will not get in this round (applied to 7 phd clinical programs)... in fact, I didn't even get any interviews. how can I improve for next year (or the year after...)?

    GPA/EDUCATION:
    3.4 at a top 15 private university known for grade deflation. psych gpa is about the same, slight upward trend, double major (other major is not really relevant)

    GRE:
    1300, taken only once. higher verbal than math

    PUBS:
    none. no presentations either

    LETTERS OF REC:
    One from advisor, one from lab supervisor, one from dean, very positive

    WORK EXPERIENCE:
    3 years part time paid social psych research assistant, 1 year part time research assistant (different lab), 1 year full time paid RA in clinical psychiatry lab (all three institutions in top 15 schools), plus one summer internship in counseling setting, plus two years counseling hotline experience (a few hours per week)



    Factors that I have considered that may have been a detraction... perhaps my personal statement did not emphasize the research match enough? (although, all profs were in the research area I want, currently one that I work on a study for, in fact) My SOP was also written in a more "personable" than "professional" style. And of course, my GPA is on the lower side. Two of my POIs let me know that I was "very competitive" and only being rejected for reasons of two many applicants/not enough departmental stipends. Still though, I find myself disheartened at the end of this process, with barely a nibble on my application. Advice appreciated!!
  15. CounselingGirl

    CounselingGirl

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    I have a few comments.

    First, What is your other major? I double majored too- my second was Fine Art. It was actually advantageous because I could say I bring a creative outlook to the lab.

    Your GPA isn't bad. Your GRE score is good. Your lack of publications puts you at a slight disadvantage, but that shouldn't keep you from interviews. I didn't have any either and was invited to interview at 5 out of 10 schools.

    Your research experience is strong. Your personal statement may have hurt you if it was not written in a professional tone. Mine consisted of a brief introduction where I mentioned my POIs. Then I discussed my research experience. Then I concluded with why the school is a good fit for me and why I want to work with those POIs. I have done a lot of other things (clinical work, leadership roles) but didn't mention them because they are on my CV, and PhD programs are much more interested in research experience.
  16. psychgirl77

    psychgirl77

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    I would say try to present a poster at a conference if you can. The rest of your stats seem good. Did you do an undergraduate thesis? If so, maybe you can present those results. Also, did you complete research with the Dean, or take a class with him? If not, I would try to get another letter from a research supervisor.
  17. futureapppsy2

    futureapppsy2 Ed Psych PhD student Moderator Gold Donor

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    It's possible that programs may be wondering about your productivity/depth of involvement with your research projects because you have so much research experience but no posters/publications (not saying this is the case, but it may raise eyebrows).
  18. McClinas

    McClinas

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    I think we were probably pretty comparable in terms of object stats, research experience, etc., although my GPA is a little higher. I applied to 16 clinical PhD programs and was accepted by one. My advice is simple: if you can afford it, apply to more programs.
  19. Thirdxthecharm

    Thirdxthecharm

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    I think the personal statement is huge and is what I spent most of my time working on this third time around. I think some people have posted their personal statements on a few forums so you might want to check those out. I found AlaskanJustin's SOP in one of these forums and thought it was very impressive. It was very personable throughout but also had a very professional flare to it. I'd like to think that's how mine was too, but am not sure. I think making it interesting to read is important, but showing you have the skills to write professionally equally as important. So try to find that balance, that's about it. I didn't have any publications, but I did have a rejected attempt at a publication and they seemed to think it was good that I at least tried and was the lead in a study.
  20. brain hugger

    brain hugger

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    This is a great thread! OK, so here goes (I'm applying for 2010-2011, so not sure if my post is appropriate. If not, just ignore and I'll add this when I can! :)):

    My transcripts have inconsistent scores:

    Undergrad GPA (top 25 school): 3.1 (took Grad School level courses while in undergrad - received A's in most of them and in all of my Psychology courses but I also have 2 F's - one in Religion, one in Government. When my mother died, I did quite poorly academically for a bit).
    Grad School GPA (Ivy League School, Masters Program in Neuroscience): 3.78 (one C+, in advanced stats)

    Research experience/publications:
    6 peer-reviewed articles (1 first-authored); 9 abstracts (national/international conferences); about 7 years of research experience, in 2 different brain imaging modalities (this is including research work starting sophomore year of college); currently doing full-time clinical research and part-time clinical work (direct patient care) at a top research hospital.

    Miscellaneous: Received numerous awards for leadership in undergrad, 1 award from the hospital I work at for patient care, and 1 teaching award when I taught abroad in Peru.


    GRE (thinking of taking it again):

    V-660
    Q-660
    Writing - 5.5


    Letters: Director of a Research Lab, Psychology Chair from Undergrad, and a Psychiatric Nurse I work under for clinical work.

    I think my GPA scores (and the F's!), maybe my GRE? are the weakest links. Do you have any recommendations on what to do to improve my application? Thanks!

  21. krisrox

    krisrox

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    You have a great application! And do mention the reason for your F's and use it as an opportunity to talk about your personal growth (if you're comfortable with that). Your GRE is great, and you have a lot of great pubs and posters to show for your research experience.
  22. RejectClinical

    RejectClinical

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    I think if you can explain away the F's (which you should be able to given the horrible circumstances)--I think it will be fine esp since your graduate gpa is good. Your verbal is outstanding!! I don't think your GRE will keep your application from getting looked at considering the composite is in the 1300s, a higher math score (in the 700s) would be helpful, but I don't think it is dire. I would check the schools you are interested in and look at their average GRE for that particular score (once again, your verbal is great!). With an outsanding SOP, you should have a good chance!
  23. hamsterpants

    hamsterpants

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    I had one F (also for non academic reasons) and it was in a Psych class and 3.3 GPA overall. I think I may not have made it through the first cut at some schools but I chose not to address it in my SOP. At interviews, no one ever brought up any aspect of my transcript including my GPA. I felt like once I got thru the first cut (GRE and GPA), it was all about research experience and match. This is where I think the SOP comes into play. YMMV.
  24. brain hugger

    brain hugger

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    You guys are very supportive! Hamsterpants made a good point, though. I may not even make the first cut! I've worked so hard research-wise and I worry that all my papers & presentations won't matter if they don't even look at my application after looking at my transcripts.

    Has anyone else had issues with GPA/transcripts? What else is there to do besides publish, do more research, and work on my SOP?

    I feel like I can work as hard as I want but that in the end, my GPA and F's (and that C+ in advanced stats) will stop me from the beginning. :(
  25. hamsterpants

    hamsterpants

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    oh no, I didn't mean to discourage you. I think you will likely be fine. I just meant it may not be worth it to explain it in your SOP since they prob. won't really read it til you are past the GPA hurdle anyway. Just an idea. I wanted to use my SOP for highlighting my positives not remind them of any negatives. But you may decide differently. I had Cs too ;)

    But I think I made it past the first hurdle at most schools. and all the POIs I contacted at schools I had been rejected from mentioned that I could use more relevant research experience, no one really mentioned my GPA. and you def. have good experience and pubs. your LORs are important and yours sound good too.

    Edited to add: oh I just realized you have a good graduate gpa. You will be fine!
    People recommended I get a masters and better grades if I found myself rejected due to undergrad gpa. I also think my gre overset my gpa abit since they are often looked at combined.
  26. Sunshine3710

    Sunshine3710

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    I agree with Hampsterpants. As you said, your Fs were in Religion and Government, not Psych. It is evident that you are capable of graduate work from your Grad school GPA, and if you highlight your research experience in your SOP, there shouldn't be a problem. You look like a very good candidate to me! :)

    On a slightly-funny side note, I had some weird issues come up with my transcript because my school includes Narrative Evals with the grades, so even though I might have gotten a good overall grade, my eval can "tattle" on me. For example, I'm not great at math, and was happy with just a B in my Pre-Calc course. I didn't think most schools would care that much about the course, but in one of my interviews it got pointed out that my Eval said I got a D on one of my midterms. It was embarassing to have it pointed out, but then the interviewer said that my GRE score made up for it. The funny thing is, I had a choice of including the Evals or not, and I chose to include them when I sent my transcripts because I thought all the glowing reviews in my upper-div psych classes would look good. Learned my lesson there....:rolleyes:
  27. brain hugger

    brain hugger

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    Hi everyone! Thanks for all your comments. :) I'm really glad that the GPA matters but doesn't necessarily hinder one's chances.

    Narrative Evals? That's pretty cool. I wish we had them at my school. It'd be interesting to have a more detailed understanding of what the professor thought (versus just looking at a grade).
  28. PsychPhDStudent

    PsychPhDStudent

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    Looks good! You can definitely "explain away" the F's. How many stats courses have you taken besides the advanced one with the low grade? Do you think you can get your GRE a little higher? And do you have any personal connections to POIs (though your letter-writers)? Those are probably key.

  29. brain hugger

    brain hugger

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    deleted post
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2011
  30. mattman

    mattman

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    I really want to get a PsyD in Clincal Psych

    So my degree was not in a Psychology field, actually Social Science/Education where I took a variety of classes in the social science field. My GPA was 3.17 and I am terrified of the GRE. I studied for 2 years for the LSAT as I thought I wanted to do Law, spent about $2k on test prep, classes, and what not and did horrible. Granted the GRE may be a lot easier then the LSAT I am not sure spending another $2k on a GRE test prep class is worth it. I know that my passion is Psychology but with a 3.17 GPA

    I am wondering is it worth it? I could get an MA but I would be in debt forever.
    I may do Peace Corps in North Africa..Will this help my application at all?

    Also while overseas would getting on Online MA degree be looked down upon? Basically in the end going to a paper mill school like JFK or another proffesional school, which costs nearly the same, may be my only choice.

    A good friend goes to Alliant and he likes it a lot and is getting some nice internships in the Bay Area. If I go there I could save money and live at home.

    I was a Behavior Therapist for a year and a half so have some clinical experience.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated.!
  31. BlergLDN

    BlergLDN

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    Hi folks! Just started checking this forum and thought I should register and say hi! This is more for the upcoming 2010 application cycle, so I apologize in advance if this is the wrong place! I've made this somewhat vague in the interest of anonymity...

    GPA: 3.9 from top 30 University, psych major
    GRE: 1270 (580 verbal, 690 quant, 4.5 writing), 670 subject
    Pubs: 1 (not 1st author)
    Presentations: 4
    Experience: 2 years during undergrad in a few different labs and completed a senior thesis. 2 years work experience after undergrad in psych research lab at a University. Clinical experience during undergrad for about 1 year, good hands-on experience, though I was rarely ever asked about it.
    Letters of rec: All from psych professors I have done research with. 2 of the professors I'm fairly close with, 1 that I'm not as close with, but I believe wrote a good letter.

    Last year, applied to about 5 programs, received 2 interviews. Applied this year to about 12 places, received 3 in-person interviews and 2 phone interviews. However, no acceptances.

    At this point, I'm wondering if I should continue on my hopes to get into a clinical PhD program or move on. I'm mainly interested in research oriented programs, but also applied to programs that lean closer to 50-50 between research and clinical. I'm not sure I can realistically make my application that much stronger and could use any suggestions. I know my GREs are on the lower end, so I'm trying to work on my general, though I'm hoping my subject is high enough. My concern is that I am not a very consistent standardized test taker. I was hoping to get another publication with this past job, but it's been difficult as the PI really only publishes with the grad students. I've had my statement of purpose reviewed and edited, though I'm thinking I should make some big revisions. Anyone know of any good resources for writing psych statements in particular? Maybe I'm awful at interviews, any good resources for interviews (I have the Insider's Guide)?
  32. Sunshine3710

    Sunshine3710

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    I liked the Getting In book. It seems aimed towards first-time applicants, but it still might be worth looking at as far as interview and personal statement advice.
  33. BuckeyeAlum

    BuckeyeAlum

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    BlergLDN- honestly, I think a good interviewing resource is practicing with real people! I know it's funny pretending to interview with friends/family/coworkers, but I think it helps. You could go to a nearby career center too. And you all might think I'm nuts, but when I was getting ready to interview, I practiced by answering possible questions outloud in my car while driving!

    As far as other interviewing issues - besides what you SAY, think about how you come across in other ways. Did you dress appropriately and/or appealingly? I was sort of surprised by some of the outfits I saw. What about your body language and speech? I talked to a few nervous applicants who said things that did not flatter them and/or acted so anxious that it was hard to be around them.

    That being said, you may have done well but just missed the cut by one person. Maybe your SOP needs some fine-tuning. I think your other credentials look good, including your GRE.
  34. wanttoknow

    wanttoknow

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    Hello,
    This is a very interesting thread. I have a question I hope you PhD clinical psych applicants might be able to help me with. My niece applied to very competitive PhD programs (Univ. of Virginia, U Conn, U of Oregon) based on her interest in Attachment Theory. All of the above have faculty working in Attachment Theory.
    She also applied to LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY in Brooklyn, which seems to have a different focus than the above schools.
    She was accepted by LIU but does not know a lot about it. She is having a hard time getting over her disappointment of not getting into a more prestigious university, although the more she looks into LIU, the more interesting it looks (and who wouldn't want to live in NJYC?)
    Does anyone know more about the clinical PhD program at LIU? They accept 14 out of 2 - 300 applicants.
    Thanks!
  35. psich

    psich

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    I don't know about LIU, but in general, I think your question might get more views/answers if you make your own topic in the forum.
  36. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Moderator Emeritus

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    Please do not make a new thread, as I am sure there have been previous threads on LIU, most likely in the past few months. Do a search and bump an old thread.
  37. gophillies

    gophillies

    Joined:
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    Psychology Student
    HI all, I'm writing to get your thoughts and feedback about my candidacy. I'll be applying to both psyc. PhD and PSY. D programs this fall. I graduated college in 2002 with a degree in microbiology with abhorrent GPA of 2.4. After spending eight years in medical sales, I decided I wanted to go back to school and work in a field, that will "do for others", pardon the cliche. Initially I decided upon education and just finished a masters of education with close to a 4.0. But I've decided psyc is my passion. I've taken three additional undergrad psyc. courses and have recieved A's in all of them. I scored a 1280 on the GRE on the first try. 610V 670Q. I'm getting glowing reccomendations from my professors.


    My undergrad grades where for a lack of effort and maturity. At 31 years old, I'm much more focused and determined, I just hope the admissions committess will believe this. Any thoughts on how you think I might do? I'm a realist and know that I don't stand a shot with top rated programs. I prefer PhD to PSY.D. because I love the idea of teaching and research as a career.

    Any feedback you could spare would be greatly appreciated!
  38. erg923

    erg923

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    I would recommend getting some substantial research experience before you even attempt apply to clinical ph.d programs. Its the single heaviest weighted factor after one passes the numbers cut-off (ie., GPA and GRE). There' really no point in applying until you have some, as you will get tossed out pretty quick.
  39. TenaciousGirl

    TenaciousGirl so close, yet so far away

    Joined:
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    pfft.... you're practically a shoe in. I mean this in the broad sense... of course the school has to be a good fit and research fit and blah blah blah but seriously, you're the kind of applicant a lot of programs look for. Sure you had a minor slip up with grades, but for a valid reason. The fact that you're currently at an Ivy will probably override the grades that aren't favorable. Whether people like to admit it or not, elitism runs rampant in this field and you have the names on your app that elitists like to read.
  40. vthokie2011

    vthokie2011

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
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    Status:
    Pre-Psychology
    Hey,

    I am a junior at Virginia Tech.

    I am looking at various schools including: Virginia Tech, University of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, University of Maryland, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill, Duke, Temple, and other universities.

    I want to do a clinical Ph.D. program.

    I have not taken the GRE yet, I am planning in August.

    I have a 3.7 overall GPA
    3.88 psychology (major)
    4.00 sociology (minor)
    3.70 statistics (minor)

    I have a regular job, I have worked in a private practice for an internship over the summer, I work in an undergraduate lab with a very prestigious professor where I am also a member of the coding team, and lastly I volunteer at a mental health crisis hotline.

    I am planning on doing a poster over the summer (to present it at a national conference) and hopefully a publication of one of my research papers if I get the time.

    I am a member of Psi Chi, Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society, and McNair Scholar Progam. I am always on the Dean's list.

    I will be working in my lab over the summer and just got federally funded to do so.

    I know of two letter of recommendations, one from my lab professor which knows me well and the other from a psychologist at the private practice...I don't know the third yet.

    What are my chances of getting into a program for Fall 2011?

    P.S...I have really been advised to take a year or two off (to gain experience) but I really don't want to!!!
  41. PsychPhDStudent

    PsychPhDStudent

    Joined:
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    This should be in WAMC...in other news...why don't you want to? It'll make you much more competitive. In your current lab, how many of the grad students took time off? Do they seem upset that they did? :)
  42. GreenPsych

    GreenPsych

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    Dec 6, 2009
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    Psychology Student
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  43. krisrox

    krisrox

    Joined:
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    Coming from an applicant who didn't take a year off after UG, I will say that it DOES give an applicant an edge, but your experiences sound very good and competitive on their own. Is your research job paid? I think that's what set me apart from other straight-out-of-UG applicants.
  44. heygirlhey211

    heygirlhey211

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2008
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    In my experience, whether research experience was paid or unpaid was irrelevant during the application process. I had a mix of both paid and unpaid research assistantships and no one asked which were paid on my interviews. I think that the quality of the experience is more important--for example, data entry and coding experience will not be valued as highly as research coordinating, data management, or preparing a manuscript. It could be true that as a paid RA you would get more relevant experience than you would as a volunteer.

    In order to apply next year, I would recommend that you make sure you get research experience relevant to your area of research interest. If you are more interested in another professor's research, working in his or her lab would have the added bonus of potentially providing you with a 3rd letter of recommendation. Additionally, the schools you are all within the same region. If possible, it might be better to broaden the scope of school choices geographically (and then narrow choices based on research fit).
  45. PsychPhDStudent

    PsychPhDStudent

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    Another thought: a lot has to do with the general research topic you're interested in. Of the schools I applied to, all labs within the same research interest, I can't say I saw anyone recently accepted who hadn't done full time research experience. You do sound like you have a leg up on other undergrad applicants, but thinking careerwise, it may help you more in the long term to gain more experience now that you can apply to grad school in a year or two later. Anyway, my two cents, I'll get off my soapbox now. :)
  46. krisrox

    krisrox

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    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Another tip: you shouldn't limit yourself to a geographic area when applying. You need to apply based on a research match, not anything else.
  47. passionist

    passionist

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    Apr 24, 2010
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    SDN 2+ Year Member
    deleted
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2012
  48. futureapppsy2

    futureapppsy2 Ed Psych PhD student Moderator Gold Donor

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Status:
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    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Why not just stick with a psych MSN and become a psych nurse or stick with pharmacy? Both probably pay better, so what's drawing you to a PsyD in particular? What do you want to do with the degree?
  49. passionist

    passionist

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    deleted
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2012
  50. caitlinelise10

    caitlinelise10

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    Messages:
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    Status:
    Psychology Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    I will be graduating with a BS in Psychology, social work minor in August. I AM going to get into a PsyD program one of these days no matter what. That is the only thing I want to do. However, I am wondering what my chances are of getting into a PsyD program when I graduate, or if I should take some grad classes first, or if I should pursue a masters first. Ok, a little about me:

    Graduated from high school one year early, second highest PSAT score in my high school (commended), in the 90th percentile for SAT score the first and only time I took it.

    When I graduate in August, I will have a 3.25 overall GPA :eek:, which sucks I know. BUT, I will have a 3.92 Psychology GPA (only B I got was developmental so stats, research, etc. were all A's), a 4.0 in my last 60 hours, and a 3.8 without my freshman year. I was a pre-med major (wanted to go into psychiatry) my first year and totally bombed, but as soon as I decided I actually wanted to go into clinical psychology and changed my major, I got mostly A's and a few of B's (like maybe 5 total in my last three years). I have made the dean's list every semester since my freshman year, and was awarded a liberal arts academic award this semester. I have not taken the GRE yet, but expect to get a score comparable to my SAT score... hopefully. Oh, and my school is a public university and is not prestigious or anything.

    I have not had any research experience besides my mini thesis for my research class and do not really have any interest whatsoever in research (which is the reason I am pursuing a PsyD instead of a PhD).

    I have been working as a psychiatric assistant for a year, helping with notes, prescriptions, and evaluating patients. I would have an AWESOME letter of recommendation from her.

    I don't care what program I get into as long as it is accredited and isn't something like Argosy. What do you think my chances are, or should I do some grad work first? If you think I have a chance, what PsyD programs would I have the best chance of getting into? Sorry for the mini novel ;). Thanks!
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2010

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