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What are some reasons why doctors have lost their license.

Discussion in 'Topics in Healthcare' started by carlosc1dbz, 03.11.10.

  1. carlosc1dbz

    carlosc1dbz Loves Christina Aldana!

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    Losing ones license is a very big deal, especially since it takes 11 years minimum to get? What are some of the worst reasons a doctor has lost his license? What about some of the good reasons a doctor loses his or her license. What do they do after they lose their license, commit suicide?
     
  2. VA Hopeful Dr

    VA Hopeful Dr Senior Member

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    Inappropriate relations with a patient, inappropriate prescribing of controlled substances, drugs/booze/crime.
     
  3. Instatewaiter

    Instatewaiter But...There's a troponin

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    Listen to this one!

    So relatively recently, the best Cardiolgist in Baltimore (you know, where Johns Hopkins is) was part of a group of cardiologists who were going to be bought out by a group we'll call Company X. That would make each of the cardiogists millionaires overnight. Well before this deal went through, this best known cardiogist ended up leaving the practice for another practice at a different hospital. Well Company X said the deal would be a no-go if this doc didn't come back. Well he didn't want to come back so all the cardiogists said *publically* that they were going to ruin him.

    The cardiologists group called medicare and said he was doing unneccessary procedures to cause problems for this guy. Well medicare reviewed all of his 17,000 caths and found about 300 they said should not have been stented. Remember that medicare is always decades behind the cutting edge and this was the best cardiologist in the Baltimore so his judgement is better than the "standards" medicare uses. Remember also that 1 milimeter can make the difference between a 70% stenosis and a 40% stenosis.

    Well to make a long story short, he's probably going to go to jail for medicare "fraud" and will likely lose his medical license. The Gov't is a scary thing when they can tell you what is proper medical care and what is not! This should be a cautionary tale to everyone interested in a gov't takeover of medicine.
     
  4. VA Hopeful Dr

    VA Hopeful Dr Senior Member

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    Aren't there new studies coming out (or that have come out recently) suggesting that we might be doing too many caths?
     
  5. carlosc1dbz

    carlosc1dbz Loves Christina Aldana!

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    Wow, that is crazy. I guess you have to be careful who you upset because all they have to do is report you and they will look for a few mistakes. That is super scary. Poor guy. I would of personally stayed after being bought out, and then left, or gotten fired, but Im sure there is more to the story than than meets the eye.

    Ok I have a story, so in El Paso Texas, which a border city, there was a doctor that decided to open up an 18 hour clinic or something like that. He set up the place in a shopping mall along I-10. His clinic had big bold red lettering that said Dr. (something) D.O. 18 HOUR CLINIC. Many doctors in that city did not like that his sign lacked elegance and discreteness that is the normal among the medical community. So everyone was complaining, about what I am not sure, but I remember it was a big deal in the city because the city newspaper was running the story and the doctor was running the risk of losing his license because the medical review board or something also said they didnt like his big red sign. He ended up keeping his license and his sign.
     
  6. carlosc1dbz

    carlosc1dbz Loves Christina Aldana!

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    So as far as the drugs and booze, what are the exact criteria for losing your license due to alcohol? like if you get 3 DUI you lose your medical license? Or if you do a random drug test and you have THC in your system your a gonner?

    What about the crime criteria, can you lose your license for a misdemeanor charge or does it have to be a felony? But then there are some felonies that are not as bad as others? Any ideas?
     
  7. cpants

    cpants Member

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    A
    Any drug related charges are huge because mds prescribe controlled substances. A dui won't necessarily hurt your license, but don't be surprised when they decide to evaluate you for a substance abuse problem and possibly require therapy. Uncontrolled substance abuse problems, including alcohol, are certainly grounds for license revocation or suspension. Most states have voluntary programs for impaired physicians which they can undergo without license penalties.
     
  8. carlosc1dbz

    carlosc1dbz Loves Christina Aldana!

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    Wow Im really surprised that they have that voluntary program. That is really good though. I wonder if it is utilized much?

    I was thinking about the patient doctor romantic relationship. Is that only a problem if you start relationship while the person is your patient, or no patient of your can ever be in a romantic relationship with their doctor?
     
  9. PostLessOne

    PostLessOne

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    State medical boards will publish the names and cases for physicians who are put on probation. It's surprising what they'll give someone a second chance for. Substance abuse, mistakes that result in a death, sexual relationships with patients...at least in Texas, the board has given physicians who have done all of these things a second chance on probation.
     
  10. PostLessOne

    PostLessOne

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    At this link you can find what action the Texas state medical board took against these particular physicians for their violations. You'll notice that very few actually resulted in a license revocation: http://www.tmb.state.tx.us/news/press/2010/021710.php

    Some choice cases that sounded interesting to me :

    Olmsted, William Robert, M.D., Lic. #J1550, Georgetown TX
    On February 3, 2010, the Board temporarily suspended without notice the license of Dr. Olmsted after determining that Dr. Olmsted's continuation in the practice of medicine presents a continuing threat to the public welfare. The action was based on Dr. Olmsted's failure to comply with a 2009 agreed order entered into with the Board requiring him to submit to an independent psychiatric evaluation by a Board-appointed psychiatrist within 30 days of the appointment of the psychiatrist and to continue with any treatment recommended by the psychiatrist. The Board found evidence that Dr. Olmsted continues to engage in a pattern of disregard for the 2009 agreed order. The 2009 agreed order followed Dr. Olmsted's 2006 arrest by Dallas police alleging indecency with a child, and a later plea of no contest to a charge of child indecency by contact, a second-degree felony, which required him to register as a sex offender and placed him on deferred adjudication. The Temporary Suspension (Without Notice of Hearing) will remain in effect until the Board takes further action.

    Dr. Olmsted pled no contest to sexual abuse, and did not lose his license or go to jail. It appears that if he had shown up for his appointment with a psychiatrist, he would not have lost his license even temporarily.

    Khan, Nameem Ullah, M.D., Lic. #L6235, Amarillo TX
    On February 5, 2010, the Board and Dr. Khan entered into a mediated agreed order of public reprimand barring Dr. Khan from performing conscious sedation and requiring Dr. Khan to complete a formal education program in conscious sedation within two years; and complete 20 hours of CME in orthopedic emergencies and pain management. The Board's action was based on Dr. Khan's failure to meet the standard of care by use of inappropriate anesthesia agents and procedures for sedation for a patient with a dislocated shoulder. As a result of Dr. Khan's action the patient died.

    Dr. Khan apparently did things wrong and killed a patient. Still licensed.

    Anabtawi, Isam Nazmi, M.D., Lic. #D5588, Port Arthur TX
    On February 5, 2010, the Board and Dr. Anabtawi entered into an agreed order of public reprimand requiring Dr. Anabtawi to complete five hours of CME in ethics within one year and pay an administrative penalty of $8,000. The Board's action was based on Dr. Anabtawi's indictment on 150 felonious counts of health care fraud and, in lieu of trial, entrance into a federal 18-month pretrial diversion program.

    What's a little fraud between friends?

    To make a long story short : if you earn a medical license, you generally have to do something really extreme before they'll completely revoke it. Like poison your wife with cyanide or something. Most of the time, it sounds like you have to say you're sorry and do some remedial training or counseling. Overall, this probably is a good thing. There's such a shortage of doctors that society probably benefits more than it loses by having some of the sketchier physicians continue practicing. Near the bottom, they have the actual revocations. Generally, the physicians who actually lose their licenses didn't do what the medical board told them to do, or violated their probation somehow. Or surrendered their license due to illness. I saw almost no cases where the medical board took someone's license without having given them second, third, fourth chances.

    In general, nearly all of the cases here were for crime, failing to maintain good medical records, or for prescribing addictive drugs inappropriately.
     
    Last edited: 03.13.10
  11. cpants

    cpants Member

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    Yeah, they are utilized a lot. The programs are for physicians impaired in any way, substances, dementia, physical disability, psych issues, etc. If you are worried about a colleague, you can call them, rather than the medical board. We had an interesting talk from the director of the NJ program. He said the year after they started the program they were flooded with referrals. Most of the physicians are able to keep practicing with or without practice modifications and treatment. One interesting thing he told us is that they embarrassingly diagnose uncontrolled diabetes in several physicians each year. The docs are walking around in DKA, and colleagues, thinking they are drunk, call the program on them.
     

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