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What exactly are EMT, EMR, EMS, and so on?

Discussion in 'Pre-Hospital [ EMS ]' started by ysk1, 08.30.07.

  1. ysk1

    ysk1 Removed

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    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    I'm aware that they are certifications that you get after taking relevant courses, but what's the difference between those?
    Thanks.
  2. ChubbyChaser

    ChubbyChaser Yummmy

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    EMS is emergency Medical services, that just refers to the entire system from EMRs to Paramedics

    EMR's are Emergency Medical responders, They are able to provide basic first aid and care

    EMTB is Emergency medical technician Basic. They can provide first aid and administer medications and in some states Intubate

    EMTI- Intermediate. They can do everything the Basic can do and also start IVs, administer more medications etc

    EMTP are paramedics they are the head honchos-
  3. ChubbyChaser

    ChubbyChaser Yummmy

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    O yeah, and the training time MRs can usually get certified in 8 weeksish

    Basics 5 or 6 months

    Intermediates probably around a year

    And paramedics two years
  4. ClockworkDoc

    ClockworkDoc

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    EMT - Emergency Medical Technician - They are the guys in the ambulances, but they can also be found in hospitals. There are 3 levels: basic, intermediate, and paramedic. The level of training and scope of practice increase with each level and vary by state.

    EMR - Not really sure about this one...maybe Emergence medical reserve??

    EMS - Emergency Medical Service - This is the organization that EMT's work for.
  5. da1whotaints

    da1whotaints

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    EMR is like a first responder. As far as I've heard this isn't actually something you do to get a job. Almost every cop is an EMR since they're always the first on the scene. but it is nice to know how to respond should an emergency happen.
  6. 146233

    146233 Phthirius pubis

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    Moving to Pre-Hospital forum for further discussion... :)
  7. ysk1

    ysk1 Removed

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    Is it advantageous to get certifications up to the highest one, EMTP, and get an EMTP job?
    What level do most med school applicants have? (EMR, EMTB, EMTI, EMTP)
    Which of the four positions makes you most competitive for med school?
  8. gotmeds?

    gotmeds?

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    For med school? No. It might make you a stronger appicant, but there are much more efficient ways to boost your application. Not to mention that an EMT-P license means nothing if you don't actually use it for a few of years. Keep in mind that it takes about 1200 - 1500 hours to become an EMT-P.

    Most med school applicants (contrary to what SDN might lead you to believe) have no professional licenses or certifications.

    I'm not really sure how to answer this. Each of those is a professional license or certification. It's not really relevant to med school, but if you have the corresponding clinical experience, then the clinical experience itself (not the license) will help your application.
  9. ysk1

    ysk1 Removed

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    Does that 1200 - 1500 hours include time required to get EMR, EMTB, and EMTI, in addition to EMTP, or does that only include time to obtain an EMTP alone?
  10. gotmeds?

    gotmeds?

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    Nope. You have to get your EMT-B first, which is around 120 hours. For most paramedic programs, you need at least 6 months of field experience as an EMT-B before they'll accept you.

    So you're looking at a minimum of a month to take an accelerated EMT class, 6 months of field work, and another year to a year and a half to get your paramedic license, all of it full-time. Then for your EMT-P to mean anything, you should work in the field as a paramedic for at least a couple of years.

    That's why it's not really a practical route for most pre-meds and also why most of the paramedics I know who have gotten into med school (myself included) were paramedics before they were pre-meds, not the other way around.
  11. ysk1

    ysk1 Removed

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    Thanks for a great reply, gotmeds?.
    In my area, a 105-hour Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) course is offered. I don't think any courses for EMTI, EMTB, and EMTP are offered.
    I'm aware that EMR is the lowest level.
    What position can you obtain with this certificate?
    Would it be worthwhile to get an EMR license?
    Also, is EMR a prerequisite for EMRB?
  12. kylek044

    kylek044

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    Are you in the US?

    EMR or FR classes are usually 40 hours.
    EMT-B tends to be 120+

    Around me, the cert of EMR is used just for cops, FFs, etc. Typically the people on an ambulance corps are EMTs. I don't think there are any paid jobs for EMRs.

    You can answer your own question about if it's worthwhile, though. Is it worthwhile for you? Are you going to use it? It's not worthwhile to take up a space in a class, wasting an educator's time, if you just want to pad your application. It is worthwhile if you use your training.

    If you're interested in doing it, I'd go EMT-B if I were you. Look up your state's office of Emergency Medical Services, and they will probably list training center.
  13. SmallTownEMT

    SmallTownEMT

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    You can start right at the EMT-B level, you don't need to be a first responder first.
    If you're interested go for it. It's a great way to get in the field and work with patients.
    Also check colleges for EMT-B courses, some do offer them.
  14. ysk1

    ysk1 Removed

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    What clinical jobs are worthwhile for med school?
  15. kylek044

    kylek044

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    Worthwhile?
    What are you looking for?
    Money? Helping people? Padding your application?

    Being an ER Tech is good exposure, but you have to have the stomach for it, and the pay isn't great. By me, you can sign up and they'll give you a quick 5-day training (EKG placement, etc.) and then will usually pay for your EMT cert which you need to have completed within a year after beginning to work. I think the techs in my EMT class were actually paid for taking the class because it fell during their shift and was considered "job training" ... they DID have to wear their green scrubs though :)
  16. fiznat

    fiznat Senior Member

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    There has been lots of debate as to whether EMS in general (nevermind basic vs paramedic etc) helps applications to medical schools.

    In general I feel if your intention is soley to pad your application - as it seems to be - your time could be better spent elsewhere. Do some research maybe, get something published. Add strength to your academics. Work in a hospital setting alongside docs.

    Dont get me wrong, there is LOT to see and learn in EMS. I am very happy that I got into this before I made my decision to apply to medical school. Becoming a paramedic has made a lot of things clear to me that I would have had to guess about otherwise, and the experiences and lessons have been absolutely invaluable. Still though, if you are sure you are applying, this is not good application fodder. Unless you care about it, dont do it.
  17. ysk1

    ysk1 Removed

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    fiznat: Why I want to obtain EMT certificates to work as an EMT is not only because I want to boost my competitiveness for med school, but also because I want to gain clinical experience to see if the field of medicine is a good fit for me.

    In total, how long did it take for you to take all the necessary EMS courses and obtain an EMT position you're working in now? What certificates do you have? (EMR, EMT-B, EMT-I, EMT-P)
  18. greytmedic

    greytmedic Faster than you

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    Getting your EMT certificate is probably not the best route to go just to see if medicine is a good fit. I would suggest contacting local doctors to see if you can shadow. That will give you a clearer appreciation for "medicine" as it pertains to medical school. Pre-hospital care is a different beast than being a physician. If you want to do EMS, try contacting local ambulance providers (depends on your area, but try fire departments or ambulance service) and see if they offer some kind of ride along program. They will usually let you do a couple of shifts on the ambulance just to observe and see if you want to get into EMS.

    I would suggest "trying on" EMS by a ride along program and medicine by shadowing before committing to taking the EMT class just to see if its a good fit.
  19. leviathan

    leviathan Drinking from the hydrant Moderator Emeritus

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    Sounds like he might be in Canada given the length of the EMR, which changes things. Here it goes as such:

    Emergency Medical Responder (EMR): 120 hours, lowest level of training provided, hired only in rural + remote stations with very low call volumes where they are desperate. Similar to EMT-B in the US.

    Primary Care Paramedic (PCP): 600-1000 hours, is the standard license most EMS employees have in the country. EMR is required before taking PCP, and PCP is probably similar to EMT-I in the US.

    Advanced Care Paramedic (ACP): 1000-2000 hours, is the ALS equivalent for pre-hospital care in Canada. EMR + PCP are required before starting ACP training. Similar to EMT-P level.

    Critical Care Paramedic (CCP): ~1000 hours. Mostly involved in transport of critically ill patients, with additional training in invasive monitoring, transvenous pacing, intraaortic balloon pumps, central line insertion, chest tube insertion, etc. Requires EMR+PCP+ACP training before starting.

    Infant Transport Team (ITT): ~1000 hours. Specially trained team of ALS medics in BC for pediatric + neonatal care. Requires EMR+PCP training to start.
  20. ysk1

    ysk1 Removed

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    leviathan: Your post is exactly what I was looking for; I was wanting to know the Canadian equivalents for the US's EMR, EMT-B, I, and P. I live in Vancouver, BC, too. :)
    I have one more question: To work as an Emergency Technician, what certificates do you need?
    Thanks.
  21. Compass

    Compass Squishy Moderator Emeritus

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    EMT-B can be done in a summer if you take it at a local community college, like I did. As far as padding goes, it really is ONLY padding if you get licensed and then don't do anything with it. I'm affiliated, and currently going through training crew at a local fire station, and then I'm going to ride one day a week, 12 hours (volunteer = 1 night shift a week), in addition to taking 17 credit hours at school. That way, I'm actually using it, interacting with patients, getting clinical experience, and feeling great doing it. Don't do it if you're just going to get the license. Do it if you're actually going to use it. And no, you're not expected to keep going and going. There's no way I can plan my second semester schedule to get a free day for volunteering (1 hour commute either way, and I have MCAT classes on weekends on campus ;_;), so I'm just going to take school leave and work my butt off over the summer. Neh? :)

    Edit - ER Techs in some states I recall are only EMT-B. However, in our state, it's RN.
  22. gotmeds?

    gotmeds?

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    That doesn't make any sense. Why would an RN be an ER tech rather than an ER nurse? I know that some hospitals don't have ER techs but instead use LVNs . Is that what you meant?
  23. ysk1

    ysk1 Removed

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    It's confusing that EMR in Canada is equivalent to EMR-B in the US.
    What's the Canada's equivalent for the US's EMR?
  24. leviathan

    leviathan Drinking from the hydrant Moderator Emeritus

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    The descriptions I gave above are the courses you need to take to become licensed at each level.

    That would probably be the FR 2 or FR 3 (FR = first responder). Most firefighters and some police officers have this training. Another option is Occupational First Aid - Level II or III. Those are 40 and 80 hour courses, respectively.
  25. jkelly2

    jkelly2 Huge member

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    He means CNA. In Maryland, you must be a CNA to work as a hospital tech. ALS credentials may help the transition between CNA and PCT (depending on the facility), but an EMT-B/I/P cannot work in a hospital without that CNA cert.
    Also, I haven't seen too many LPNs around here that work in hospitals. I know that some of the Hopkins affliates hire LPNs, and of course the nursing homes are full of them however. Are you from TX or CA??
  26. gotmeds?

    gotmeds?

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    Aw, you found me out! I'm from CA. The majority of hospitals around here hire EMTs as ER techs, but some will only hire LVNs (and I'm not sure if they actually call them techs or something else).

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