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What is ER-tech and how to get the job?

Discussion in 'Pre-Hospital [ EMS ]' started by veeolist, 04.07.05.

  1. veeolist

    veeolist Junior Member

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    I'm starting pre-med in the fall, almost finished w/ NYS EMT-B course. Considering ER tech vs. ambluance jobs. During my ER rotation, I asked the triage nurse about ER techs, and he seemed to answer that they don't really have any and wasn't sure what they even did. So, to anyone that knows better, what does an ER tech do exactly, how competitive are those positions, and if any of you know specifically in New York City where some of these openings are, I'd love to know! Thanks.
     
  2. hospPA

    hospPA Senior Member

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    I was an ER tech prior to going to PA school. It was great experience. I have also worked on the rigs. I would vote for the ER tech as being better. In the ER I worked in, an ER tech was basically a greatly expanded nursing assistant. We did the NA stuff like cleaning up patients, transporting patients, running lab specimens. But we also did stuff like do EKG's, apply spints, teach crutch walking, do compressions, bag patients, draw blood, etc. Basically whatever they could train us to do, we did.

    I know nothing about NYC, sorry.

    Pat
     
  3. Febrifuge

    Febrifuge Grizzled Old Newcomer

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  4. veeolist

    veeolist Junior Member

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    I appreciate the responses so far. Specifically, how should I go about getting hired as an ED tech? Cold calls? E-mail resumes? I don't have time to volunteer for several months (must pay bills!) or something to get my so called foot in the door, so other than just calling HR up and being really nice, any suggestions?
     
  5. hospPA

    hospPA Senior Member

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    I would actually cold call every single emergency room in your area, as far away as you are willing to drive. Ask them if they use ER techs and if they have any openings. Before you do that, check the HR websites for these hospitals to see if there are any postings. This avoids you asking a question that you should already know the answer to.

    Good luck,

    Pat
     
  6. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc2B2015

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    er tech is the way to go for entry level er positions. you can be involved in every case. work with docs/pa's/nurses/paramedics/etc to see who all the players are and what they do. it's a great job(salary sucks, but you can't have it all)
    I was an er tech/emt for 5 years before medic(emt-p) school and worked my way up the ranks. after a while I was staring iv's and doing all the rn level skills. they even scheduled me to work if an rn was sick.I never made more than $7/hr as an er tech though(keep in mind this was almost 20 yrs ago). I hear er techs now make $10-16/hr or so.
    basic er tech skills:
    brief hx taking with vital signs
    phlebotomy
    im injections
    splinting/wound bandaging
    minor surgical assisting
    cpr during codes
    pt transport
    urine testing
    minor lab procedures(strep/mono/spinning crits/etc)
    labeling/dispensing take home meds
    restraining psych pts
    applying o2 devices/suctioning
    taking resports from ems personnel on arriving pts
    performing ekg's
    giving neb tx and doing spirometry/peak flow testing
    vision/hearing screening

    adv er tech skills:
    iv's/iv meds
    foleys
    abg's
    ng tubes
     
  7. clinicaltech86

    clinicaltech86

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    I work in the ed at a hospital in VA. I am a clinical technician formally known as a er tech. The hospital that you were at might have clinical technicians, the onyl difference is that as a clinical tech you are able to get blood samples and start ivs. You also perform duties such as ekgs, i/o's, vital signs, assisting the doctor or pa with pelvic exams, rectal exams, sidations, anything really. I love my job, its a great place to start out and get a feel for where you want to take your career. Every department in my hospital hires clinical techs but of course you job duties vary. Im currently an emt and i feel that working in the er you are able to do more hands on and learn about so much as opposed to working in a specific department. The pay isnt all that great seeings how you are pretty much at the bottom but you will work your way up and its a great place to start and get your foot in the door. well good luck hopefully this helped you out.
     
  8. chimichanga

    chimichanga misunderstood

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    show up and talk to the director...

    sell yourself...

    chances are she has current ER techs that:

    1) are nursing students (20%)
    2) are med students (15%)
    3) most of the rest are there for life, and suck...

    you'll get a gig w/ persistence...

    what does she have to lose???
     
  9. NYCEMTandPAtobe

    NYCEMTandPAtobe

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    Hi veeolist--
    As you can tell by my handle, I'm an NYS EMT-B, and I've found myself in the exact same position you were in back in April '05 (probably when hospitals weren't rampantly on hiring freeze). Did you succeed in finding a position in a NYC hospital as an ER tech? I'm dying to find a position and was wondering if you had any pointers.
    Thanks a bunch!!
     
  10. NYCEMTandPAtobe

    NYCEMTandPAtobe

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    Or if anyone else has any pointers...
    I've been told this position is unionized, so I sent my info to the 1199 SEIU, the healthcare workers' union. Seems like a really slow process though. And the position never shows up on any job search engines (e.g. Monster, Indeed) when I search the NYC area.
    Frustrated!
     
  11. dasERguy

    dasERguy

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    There is a link to a video that explains a lot about being an ER Tech.
     
  12. LJA1

    LJA1

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    Lots of replies and good information already shared, I'll share what I can. I'm a pre-med paramedic currently working working as an ED Paramedic in a community hospital. Prior to getting my medic license, I my title was "ER Tech" - at least here around here, ER Tech's can be anyone from CNA's to nursing students, or even paramedics.

    Job Functions of ER Tech/EMT-B:

    Will greatly depend on where you are employed and how much your fellow staff know you/trust you. At the EMT level though, you can generally expect to practice nearly all of your BLS skills such as:

    Patient assessment, vitals and continuous monitoring and reassessment (BLS interventions when indicated) - A note on this, this is as much as you make it, RN's are typically not going to be reassessing their patients as much as you will have the opportunity to, simply because of their other job functions.
    airway management (opa/npa, BVM, suctioning, ect..)
    wound care (cleaning wounds, dressing wounds, splinting ortho-glass type splints)
    CPR during codes
    Obtaining EKG's
    Lobby triage
    Stocking supplies
    Transport (using your two legs!)
    Usually you'll have an option to learn phlebotomy (no IV's though)
    Obtain trays/special needs for RN, PA, NP or Doc
    "Assist" with various procedures at the discretion of the RN PA, NP or Doc (foley/ng tube/sutures, chest tubes/central lines ect..)

    If Paramedic, add:

    Some of the interventions within the scope of practice of a paramedic, at the discretion of your employer's policy and the RN/PA/NP/Doc. Generally though, all of the above, plus IV's. You generally are not operating under the same constructs as if you were in the field (no medical director), though you may have standing orders for certain pt presentations.

    The job, whether emt or medic, is what you make it. It is a great learning experience to hone your patient assessment and triage skills, learn how patient's change over time (not uncommon to have a patient for your entire 12hour shift or much of it), learning subtle changes in presentation in critical patients, learning a lot about how the doctor thinks and treats patients based on their complaint ect ect ect.

    A note on getting the job - SELL YOURSELF AS CUSTOMER SERVICE ORIENTED.
     
    Last edited: 02.26.14

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