which one would you choose??

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by gooze, 02.08.12.

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  1. gooze

    gooze Removed 2+ Year Member

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    if you had to choose right now based on what you know, would you pick orthopedics or urology? and why?
     
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  3. SlickNickMD

    SlickNickMD 2+ Year Member

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    lol are these the 2 hottest surgical subpecialties, I keep seeing this discussion popping up all over this site


    I'd like to know as well, leaning toward Orthopedics and interventional rads-I gotta decide by the end of my surgery rotations
     
  4. Rendar5

    Rendar5 10+ Year Member

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    depends if i like pelvic surgery and penises/balls, or if i like reducing fractures and replacing hips..
     
  5. Zuerst

    Zuerst Plutonium Member 10+ Year Member

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    I don't know about you, but I'm not too fond of handling other dude's junk.
     
  6. jcu

    jcu should have been dr. who 7+ Year Member

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    Hailing from Texas, makes sense ;)
     
  7. McGillGrad

    McGillGrad Building Mind and Body 10+ Year Member

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    Urology has one of the best combinations of medicine/surgery, inpatient/outpatient and flexibility/lifestyle in medicine. Plus, your patient base is ever increasing.
     
  8. gooze

    gooze Removed 2+ Year Member

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    yeh, i agree with this...i really like the flexibility of urology over ortho (i.e. you can stop operating in uro and still run a very productive office practice whereas that is not as much of an option in ortho)...and i think you're right in terms of the patient base increasing but also new technologies that are being developed which i think will really increase the demand for urologists exponentially...for instance, there is an implantable artificial kidney that is being developed currently to hopefully be able to be implanted in human patients in a few years...

    with all that said, i def. see the appeal of ortho thus making the decision very difficult.
     
  9. officedepot

    officedepot 2+ Year Member

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    Last edited: 04.12.12
  10. DreamingTheLive

    DreamingTheLive (something witty here) 5+ Year Member

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    You have posted this question quite a few times in a number of threads, and I don't know what someone can tell you other than the're both great surgical fields.

    It seems like you're focusing more on the lifestyle factors of each specialty instead of the pathology/nature of the work for each respective field. For the rest of your life, which field do you want to spend the majority of your waking hours reading, learning, teaching, speaking, operating, thinking, re-learning, re-reading, re-operating, etc., about?
     
  11. officedepot

    officedepot 2+ Year Member

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    Last edited: 04.12.12
  12. VenusinFurs

    VenusinFurs I am tired, I am weary 5+ Year Member

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    Oh yes, ha ha, because urologists deal with PENISES, that is so hilarious.
     
  13. Rendar5

    Rendar5 10+ Year Member

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    Nuts or Bolts? pick one. they're very different organ systems. Would you prefer to make a guy scream by reducing their fracture or by reducing their foreskin?
     
  14. Doctor4Life1769

    Doctor4Life1769 **tr0llin, ridin dirty** 7+ Year Member

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  15. 2012mdc

    2012mdc Enjoying the Dark Side 5+ Year Member

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    Both.

    There's a few combined programs out there
     
  16. officedepot

    officedepot 2+ Year Member

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    Last edited: 04.12.12
  17. upright

    upright

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    Doesn't matter. Ortho has plenty of dicks and urology has plenty of bones.
     
  18. jcu

    jcu should have been dr. who 7+ Year Member

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    Winner!
     
  19. ArcGurren

    ArcGurren only one will survive 2+ Year Member

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    Agreed with inpatient/outpatient and flexibility/lifestyle. Disagree about the medicine/surgery combo; I think urology is more cerebral in that it involves a lot tougher anatomy than most of the other surgical specialties (with neurosurgery being the exception of course) but the medical management involved that I saw was limited pretty much to erectile dysfunction, incontinence, and long-term prostate cancer management with anti-androgens - most of which consisted of refilling prescriptions in clinic and doing a rectal/genital exam. Which is fine, but I honestly found general surgery to have more "medicine" in it.

    I think what's meant by medicine/surgery combination is that you can practice urology in a largely clinic setting if you so wish without doing much surgery (later on in life usually) or you can do more surgeries. Either way, it's first and foremost a surgical subspecialty. People shouldn't kid themselves into thinking otherwise (I nearly did and I almost paid for it). I do agree the lifestyle tends to be better than most other surgical specialties in general.

    (Incidentally in answer to the question above... while I don't like surgery, I would rather pick urology. I can suffer through 5 years of surgical residency to open a practice doing purely urodynamics and cystoscopy any day of the week over an ortho residency).
     

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