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Of those, cards has the most diverse procedures. From minimally invasive to essentially surgery.

Yes there are people who just do interventional pulm. Tends to be only a really big academic centers.

Between gi and cards, decide if you like poo more or blood. Gi is a pretty reasonable career.
In gi you are basically sticking a stick either in their mouth or butt (egd, push enteroscopy, ercp, Colo etc)

In cards you are sticking things in arteries and veins. Cards has tee (I guess kinda like an egd), right or left heart caths, pericardiocentesis, watchman, valve replacements (Tavr, Mitra clip), pacemakers, ablations and many others. Bunch of procedures if you are procedurally oriented. Anything you choose will be ho-hum/run of the mill .

I chose cards bc it changes more and has more diverse pathology.
 
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Instatewaiter

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Thank you for your response.

These all require fluoroscopy and superfellowships in IC or EP right? How do you feel about studies showing increased rates of cancer in IC? And what would you choose if you could only do Gen cards

Regarding your last sentence, I can definitely see how Cards has more exciting and more rapid advances in innovation and research but kinda curious how cards has more diverse pathology when you're dealing with so many different organs in GI, at least in Advanced Endoscopy, no?

Many require fluoroscopy. The dose of radiation has decreased so many of these studies are not super relevant but radiation exposure absolutely is a risk of those fields and is taken seriously. Yes, for some of these procedures you'd be best served doing a super fellowship (you know, if you want to do them well). This is simar for advanced endoscopy fellowships, liver etc.

I would chose gen cards over gi without a second thought, but there is a reason I'm a cardiologist.

In residency, I really didn't feel like gi had very diverse chief complaints - either you workup why there's problems with it going in (dysphagia/vomiting), or coming out (bleeding, diarrhea) or pain. It felt like groundhog day. Plus the general internist manage much of it. There is a reason there is a cardiac icu and a cardiac specific nursing floor in basically every hospital in the US but not a gi specific icu or gi floor in the vast majority.

Within the specialty, practice opportunities arent very as variable in gi. In cards it can range from long term relationship with patients (chf, gen cards) to essentially surgery (interventional/ep).

but as I said before, anything you chose will become ho him after a while
 
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chessknt

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Definitely pick a specialty for the organ system (or for PCCM if you like ICU and still being a generalist) not for the procedures since the procedures will become rote eventually.
 

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Cards. hands down. but i'm cards.
As a general cardiologist, not even just procedure wise (right heart, left heart cath, angiograms, TEE, intraop TEE, structural TEE), I have so much variety in what I do.
 
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The other thing to consider is the diversity of procedures. In GI, for example, outside of advanced endo procedures, the vast majority of procedures are either EGD or colonoscopy +/- some ERCP. This is my very rudimentary understanding for observing as an IM resident not too long ago. In cardiology there are so many different types of procedures but it also bring the problems associated with mastering them all
 
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Ton of cards bias on here. They are assuming the diversity when it comes to the Subspecialties of cardiology and not just general cards. General Cardiology has little diversity with procedures (at least in big coastal cities with higher saturation).
If we are going by subspecializations of these medical specialties I’d argue advanced endoscopy from GI. However if I were to compare General GI to General Cardiology, id have to say General GI takes the cake on diversity of procedures since a lot of gen GI docs perform a lot of the unique procedures that technically fall under advanced.

Pulm/CC not even close to the above ones. Mostly central lines/A-lines inpatient and a rare bronchoscopy that lasts minutes.
 
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chessknt

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Ton of cards bias on here. They are assuming the diversity when it comes to the Subspecialties of cardiology and not just general cards. General Cardiology has little diversity with procedures (at least in big coastal cities with higher saturation).
If we are going by subspecializations of these medical specialties I’d argue advanced endoscopy from GI. However if I were to compare General GI to General Cardiology, id have to say General GI takes the cake on diversity of procedures since a lot of gen GI docs perform a lot of the unique procedures that technically fall under advanced.

Pulm/CC not even close to the above ones. Mostly central lines/A-lines inpatient and a rare bronchoscopy that lasts minutes.
EBUS, chest tubes, POCUS, ECMO, intubation

with IP year rigid bronch, pleuroscopy, cryo/laser stuff, trachs, PEG tubes etc.
 
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EBUS, chest tubes, POCUS, ECMO, intubation

with IP year rigid bronch, pleuroscopy, cryo/laser stuff, trachs, PEG tubes etc.
Depends on the institution. At least at my uni hospital, chest tubes done by surgery, pocus by a tech or by anyone with a YouTube video, ecmo by the vascular surgeons, and intubation by anesthesia.
 

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Depends on the institution. At least at my uni hospital, chest tubes done by surgery, pocus by a tech or by anyone with a YouTube video, ecmo by the vascular surgeons, and intubation by anesthesia.
And the bolded is basically the answer to the OP.
 
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Agreed with lots of card bias here. We all have within us that excites us to do the job we choose. At least for me, as a fellow who’s still training, I feel excited scrubbing into an ICD placement or a PCI. I’m sure someone here feel something similar when going into a colonoscopy. OP just have to find that for her/himself and go for it. There’s no right answer or a right way to gauge it.
 
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At some point in our career, a left main stent or an CP impella will feel like another progress note to us now but that’s another story.
 
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jdh71

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Ton of cards bias on here. They are assuming the diversity when it comes to the Subspecialties of cardiology and not just general cards. General Cardiology has little diversity with procedures (at least in big coastal cities with higher saturation).
If we are going by subspecializations of these medical specialties I’d argue advanced endoscopy from GI. However if I were to compare General GI to General Cardiology, id have to say General GI takes the cake on diversity of procedures since a lot of gen GI docs perform a lot of the unique procedures that technically fall under advanced.

Pulm/CC not even close to the above ones. Mostly central lines/A-lines inpatient and a rare bronchoscopy that lasts minutes.

Is it then funny when GI asks me to intubate before they will do their very diverse EGD?
 

jdh71

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Agreed with lots of card bias here. We all have within us that excites us to do the job we choose. At least for me, as a fellow who’s still training, I feel excited scrubbing into an ICD placement or a PCI. I’m sure someone here feel something similar when going into a colonoscopy. OP just have to find that for her/himself and go for it. There’s no right answer or a right way to gauge it.

I bet there are lots of guys super excited to shove a large scope in the back end. Like it gets them up in the morning excited with a half-boner excited.

Actually . . . no. I don't bet that. Not for a moment. I think it's that future GI monies getting folks out of bed in the morning to shove scopes in butts as fellows and its the same thing that keeps them shoving scopes in butts when done.
 
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I bet there are lots of guys super excited to shover a large scope in the back end. Like it gets them up in the morning excited with a half-boner excited.

Actually . . . no. I don't bet that. Not for a moment. I think it's that future GI monies getting folks out of bed in the morning to show scopes in butts as fellows and its the same thing that keeps them shoving scopes in butts when done.
I honestly get excited and look forward to my day in cardiology fellowship. Will I feel the same when I’m 57 and with a BMI of 38? Prob not. But that’s not the point. There’s no guarantee that I’ll ever make it to 57 so you just got do what you ❤️ in the moment, whether that’s to stent or scope. My 2 cents.
 
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jdh71

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I honestly get excited and look forward to my day in cardiology fellowship. Will I feel the same when I’m 57 and with a BMI of 38? Prob not. But that’s not the point. There’s no guarantee that I’ll ever make it to 57 so you just got do what you ❤️ in the moment, whether that’s to stent or scope. My 2 cents.

Heart work seems pretty exciting. I was commenting about butt scopes.

Impellas are cool. Game changers.
 

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Depends on the institution. At least at my uni hospital, chest tubes done by surgery, pocus by a tech or by anyone with a YouTube video, ecmo by the vascular surgeons, and intubation by anesthesia.
And at my institution finding a GI to do anything besides a scope is impossible. If IR could do endoscopy they would be equally as useful at managing GI/hepatology problems.
 
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Procedures in PulmCC seem pretty diverse. Just saw a blood clot suctioned out of a lung. It was cool until it came out and then I saw how small it was and was disappointed.
 
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I may be wrong, but my perception is that it's easier to get stuff done in the tube that is the gut (more forgiving, easier to maneuver) than the arteries. No idea how pulm stacks in that.

Dentists work in a small space and can tell you, among other specialist docs, that working 20-40 yrs in certain enclosed spaces of the human body is more or less wrecking on you.

So I consider ease of working in the space. I consider diversity more to consider risk of repetitive strain injury vs how adept and "easy" a procedure could come to feel. There's a sweet spot I feel.

Consider ergonomics and how your body'll hold up when you start getting arthritis.
 
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I may be wrong, but my perception is that it's easier to get stuff done in the tube that is the gut (more forgiving, easier to maneuver) than the arteries. No idea how pulm stacks in that.

Dentists work in a small space and can tell you, among other specialist docs, that working 20-40 yrs in certain enclosed spaces of the human body is more or less wrecking on you.

So I consider ease of working in the space. I consider diversity more to consider risk of repetitive strain injury vs how adept and "easy" a procedure could come to feel. There's a sweet spot I feel.

Consider ergonomics and how your body'll hold up when you start getting arthritis.
You are doing cardiology wrong if you still have to work by the time you get arthritis.
 
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My bias is I’m an intensivist. I think cardiology wins in terms of “cool” procedures. Most procedures I do can be done by someone else, it’s the thinking part and ability to provide quality care to super sick patients that separates me and keeps me employed. Most common procedures I do are intubation, lines, chest tubes, bronch, occasional thora/para. My fellowship trained me to do perc trachs, which I really like to do, but it gets old and the $ is probably not worth the risks. I’ve been a part of ECMO cannulations, it seems cool and exciting but it’s basically 2 large central catheters. IMO Cardiology definitely wins for cool factor of procedures and diversity. GI is 🤮, I think the reason colonoscopy is “interesting” to so many people is the $.
 
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Procedures in PulmCC seem pretty diverse. Just saw a blood clot suctioned out of a lung. It was cool until it came out and then I saw how small it was and was disappointed.

That's what she said.......sorry, couldn't help myself.
 
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Is this a futile question considering probably nobody is double boarded in these specialties? What about IM docs who practiced in the 80s or earlier?

I always see people talking about how enjoyable it is to scope as a gastroenterologist and you can see / fix a variety of pathologies. Could you make the same career out of doing that in Pulm? I've heard the volume is too low to do an Interventional Pulm practice but I'm sure someone's gonna be out there doing it. Are they having as much fun as someone doing GI scopes all day? Are they seeing/taking care of as diverse of an array of pathologies / screenings?

And how do Cards procedures compare
Depends where you are, academics will subsidize your niche of choosing, I have colleagues who perform endoscopic myotomy, submucosal dissection for esophageal/colorectal T1b CA, large small bowel/gastric NETs, endoscopic gastrojejunostomy for malignant outlet obstruction with lumen opposing stents, endoscopic pancreatic debridement/necrosectomy, endocut/endostitch, endoscopic choledocoduodenostomy for biliary drainage, others in academics do endoscopic fundoplication and endoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, this is barely scratching the surface and every single one of these procedures is a surgical sparing endoscopic procedure for a previously given surgical intervention and in many non referral centers, still is treated with surgery only. The CT/pancreaticobiliary/CRS have multidisciplinary boards with interventional GI to determine who goes to minimally invasive third space endoscopy. This is academic centers, but alot of them. Can argue GI has the greatest diversity of procedures that is still rapidly growing if that is what you want, and if you want to live in the community endo lab doing the same general luminal cases over and over while the NP is seeing consults and refer out anything you don't want to do or deal with, can do that too. TL;DR you can make of it what you choose, like any specialty, spend time around it and find out for yourself, good luck
 
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You are doing cardiology wrong if you still have to work by the time you get arthritis.
When you have fathered five children through four separate ex wives though.
 
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I bet there are lots of guys super excited to shove a large scope in the back end. Like it gets them up in the morning excited with a half-boner excited.

Actually . . . no. I don't bet that. Not for a moment. I think it's that future GI monies getting folks out of bed in the morning to shove scopes in butts as fellows and its the same thing that keeps them shoving scopes in butts when done.
My god the smell...the constant stank of poo during c scope, the incessant flatus in the room and endless rectal exams on every patient.

The ONLY reason most anyone is excited to do GI is $$$
 
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My god the smell...the constant stank of poo during c scope, the incessant flatus in the room and endless rectal exams on every patient.

The ONLY reason most anyone is excited to do GI is $$$
Even without money in the picture, GI is a literal escape from the vey things most people hate about general IM. You don’t have to sit and pontificate over a sodium level, you don’t have to deal with social work placement and you don’t get figuratively dumped on (see what I did there?) in the inpatient or outpatient setting. I still believe it then comes down to what you hate least. If I had to admit one more heart failure patient who forgot to take their lasix, or deal with the guy who had CABG, high risk PCI and is now calling for chest pain for the nth time, I’d change careers. If I had to convince another family at 9PM that their loved one in the icu is brain dead, I’d change careers. And for the rest of the IM specialties, sitting and looking at numbers on a screen makes me question my life choices. The downsides to GI, however don’t seem nearly as bad to me personally because I avoid more bad things about medicine in this sub specialty that I previously could not STAND in IM. I would also rather view 30 colons from the inside than 30 sets of lab values, but that may be just me.
 
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Cards >> GI > Pulm. In terms of diversity, in cardiology you have procedures to affect literally every way the heart functions. You can work on the plumbing with stents/angioplasty. You can tinker with the wiring with ablations/pacers/ICDs. You can plug holes with ASD/VSD closure devices. You can replace ALL of the valves. You can drain pericardial effusions. You can prevent clots with Watchman/Lariot devices. You can break up clots by shooting TPA into the pulmonary vessels. You can leave cardiomems devices in the pulmonary vessels to monitor the patient's volume status at home. Not to mention cardioversion, LHC, RHC, EMB, even simple A-line and CVC placement in the CCU. And the list of procedures only gets longer every year.

I'm sure someone is going to counter by saying "well, a general cardiologist doesn't do these things, while a general GI does lots of procedures". First, general cardiologists still do their own cardioversions and often diagnostic LHC and RHC as well. Second, unlike, say, pulm, where only ~5% or so of their fellows go into IP every year, or GI where ~10% go into advanced endoscopy (and pretty much all of these jobs are at academic centers), IC and EP account for about 45% of cardiology fellows. Even the most "community" of hospitals, the kind that don't have GI coverage on weekends, have active cath labs available 24/7.
 
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JoeBiden69

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Even without money in the picture, GI is a literal escape from the vey things most people hate about general IM. You don’t have to sit and pontificate over a sodium level, you don’t have to deal with social work placement and you don’t get figuratively dumped on (see what I did there?) in the inpatient or outpatient setting. I still believe it then comes down to what you hate least. If I had to admit one more heart failure patient who forgot to take their lasix, or deal with the guy who had CABG, high risk PCI and is now calling for chest pain for the nth time, I’d change careers. If I had to convince another family at 9PM that their loved one in the icu is brain dead, I’d change careers. And for the rest of the IM specialties, sitting and looking at numbers on a screen makes me question my life choices. The downsides to GI, however don’t seem nearly as bad to me personally because I avoid more bad things about medicine in this sub specialty that I previously could not STAND in IM. I would also rather view 30 colons from the inside than 30 sets of lab values, but that may be just me.
This is really sad to read. I remember getting so many OSH transfers as resident because the local GIs just basically didn't want to or didn't know how to deal with hepatology or IBD patients, yet these same people had no qualms about doing four colonoscopies within a year on a patient for what is clearly hemorrhoidal bleeding.

If you want to escape from medicine/using your brain, why not go into IR or surgery?
 
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This is really sad to read. I remember getting so many OSH transfers as resident because the local GIs just basically didn't want to or didn't know how to deal with hepatology or IBD patients, yet these same people had no qualms about doing four colonoscopies within a year on a patient for what is clearly hemorrhoidal bleeding.

If you want to escape from medicine/using your brain, why not go into IR or surgery?
Love of poop obviously.

All GIs should play “hello from the other side” before colonoscopies.
 
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If I have to convince anyone that GI is by far the most interesting and diverse not just procedurally but systems, along with the best balanced lifestyle, then I’d rather you not go into it. It’s usually an obvious choice for those who choose to pursue it. If it takes convincing then don’t do it.
 
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My god the smell...the constant stank of poo during c scope, the incessant flatus in the room and endless rectal exams on every patient.

The ONLY reason most anyone is excited to do GI is $$$
In all seriousness, I have still not recovered my sense of smell from covid, Im not sure if to what extent it will if ever, I'd prefer to regain it, and I was already desensitized to the fragrance before......in GI you live out the "apocalypse now" clip/meme....."you smell that son? Melena. Nothing else in the world smells like it. I love the smell of melena in the morning..... smells like......victory" qvyqk02snh121.jpg
 
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This is really sad to read. I remember getting so many OSH transfers as resident because the local GIs just basically didn't want to or didn't know how to deal with hepatology or IBD patients, yet these same people had no qualms about doing four colonoscopies within a year on a patient for what is clearly hemorrhoidal bleeding.

If you want to escape from medicine/using your brain, why not go into IR or surgery?
Not all of us had that choice based on the hundreds of reasons during medical school. IR is ultracompetitive with too much radiology. Surgery is also a tough pill to swallow. 5-6 years of general surgery residency, followed by essentially a required fellowship based on location preferences and the demand of the desired city. Some of us go into IM for the sole purpose of doing GI (not that it is the correct mindset) and with no passion for potassium levels and social work.
 

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Even without money in the picture, GI is a literal escape from the vey things most people hate about general IM. You don’t have to sit and pontificate over a sodium level, you don’t have to deal with social work placement and you don’t get figuratively dumped on (see what I did there?) in the inpatient or outpatient setting. I still believe it then comes down to what you hate least. If I had to admit one more heart failure patient who forgot to take their lasix, or deal with the guy who had CABG, high risk PCI and is now calling for chest pain for the nth time, I’d change careers. If I had to convince another family at 9PM that their loved one in the icu is brain dead, I’d change careers. And for the rest of the IM specialties, sitting and looking at numbers on a screen makes me question my life choices. The downsides to GI, however don’t seem nearly as bad to me personally because I avoid more bad things about medicine in this sub specialty that I previously could not STAND in IM. I would also rather view 30 colons from the inside than 30 sets of lab values, but that may be just me.
Dang bro. Sorry to hear. Sounds like you really chose the wrong specialty. Should have done something besides IM if you could start over. Maybe optho, ent, urology, ortho, anesthesia or rads would be up your alley.
 
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Dang bro. Sorry to hear. Sounds like you really chose the wrong specialty. Should have done something besides IM if you could start over. Maybe optho, ent, urology, ortho, anesthesia or rads would be up your alley.
Board scores not high enough for most of those. Some of us without good board scores get stuck with what we have and have to make the most of the situation. Of the specialties within FM, IM, peds, psych, etc, GI was clearly the best choice from IM.
 

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Not all of us had that choice based on the hundreds of reasons during medical school. IR is ultracompetitive with too much radiology. Surgery is also a tough pill to swallow. 5-6 years of general surgery residency, followed by essentially a required fellowship based on location preferences and the demand of the desired city. Some of us go into IM for the sole purpose of doing GI (not that it is the correct mindset) and with no passion for potassium levels and social work.
I don't think IR is more competitive than GI, at least not in today's age, maybe 10-20 years ago though, unless you were one of those people who bombed med school but then did amazingly well in residency. Also, given that GI is six years (at least), 5 years of gen surg is a steal lol. Not to mention fields like ophtho, urology, etc. that any med student good enough to get into GI eventually can get into (again, assuming you didn't bomb med school and then turn around in residency).

EDIT: I see it was an issue of board scores.
 
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This is really sad to read. I remember getting so many OSH transfers as resident because the local GIs just basically didn't want to or didn't know how to deal with hepatology or IBD patients, yet these same people had no qualms about doing four colonoscopies within a year on a patient for what is clearly hemorrhoidal bleeding.

If you want to escape from medicine/using your brain, why not go into IR or surgery?
I use to moonlight at a podunk community hospital. There was “GI coverage”. Any consult was all about $$$ scope. No interest in the pt care.

30 yo with greatly elevated liver enzymes and neg imaging? “No indication for endoscopy. Signing off” and zero comment about anything else.
 
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Board scores not high enough for most of those. Some of us without good board scores get stuck with what we have and have to make the most of the situation. Of the specialties within FM, IM, peds, psych, etc, GI was clearly the best choice from IM.
Anesthesia is only 4 yr long and easy to get into (unless you graduated like two decades ago when it was more competitive).
 
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I don't think IR is more competitive than GI, at least not in today's age, maybe 10-20 years ago though, unless you were one of those people who bombed med school but then did amazingly well in residency. Also, given that GI is six years (at least), 5 years of gen surg is a steal lol. Not to mention fields like ophtho, urology, etc. that any med student good enough to get into GI eventually can get into (again, assuming you didn't bomb med school and then turn around in residency).
I really want to keep this thread from becoming a retrospective “what are my chances” but a step 1 of 230 isn’t great when going for integrated IR. It’s one of the most competitive specialties now since becoming integrated. Step 1 of 230 is enough to get you into “a” GI fellowship with comeback scores and research in residency. Surgery on the other hand, yes it’s only 5 years of gen surg if you want to be a general surgeon. Anything more than that is going to be much longer. Some of us simply just don’t like the bread and butter of general surgery or (like myself) had a poor surgery rotation in Med school that convincingly swings us away even if we have marginal stats to make it into gen surg. It is a gamble going for IM with the purpose of going for GI (in fact I highly recommend against this heavily) but that’s how life goes sometimes.
 
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Anesthesia is only 4 yr long and easy to get into (unless you graduated like two decades ago when it was more competitive).
Anesthesia is not even close to GI in terms of day to day. Personally hated anesthesia.
 

CCM-MD

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How much does a colonoscopy actually pays? Is it more than say a PCI or an echocardiogram?
It’s not the payment per colonoscopy necessarily, it’s the ability to do many in an efficient fashion. You could line up the colonoscopies back to back and do tons in a day if you are efficient. In addition, you can do them in office/ambulatory surgery center and get the facility payment in addition to the wRVU. Could employ your own CRNA and make money off the anesthesia services too and also the pathology services in some cases.
 
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Instatewaiter

But... there's a troponin
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Pulm/CC not even close to the above ones. Mostly central lines/A-lines inpatient and a rare bronchoscopy that lasts minutes.

I'm going to disagree here. I feel like pulm critical care does a variety of procedures. Where I am it includes: central lines, a lines, swans, intubations, ECMO, bronchs, chest tubes, thoras and lps- especially in. Cardio thoracic icu you're going to see a bunch of procedures.
 

Instatewaiter

But... there's a troponin
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wRVUs:
Colonoscopy: 3.56
PCI (single vessel): 10.10
TTE: 1.13
Let's add a few:
Svt ablation 19
Tavr- 25.13 - (do 4-6 per day)
Impella implant 7ish (takes 10 min)
Impella reposition 3.5ish (usually 5 min)

Compare that to 70 minute admission which is 3.5 wrvu and you realize why proceduralists make a lot more money.
 
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Feb 12, 2005
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Let's add a few:
Svt ablation 19
Tavr- 25.13 - (do 4-6 per day)
Impella implant 7ish (takes 10 min)
Impella reposition 3.5ish (usually 5 min)

Compare that to 70 minute admission which is 3.5 wrvu and you realize why proceduralists make a lot more money.

bro it’s 3.86 rvu for an inpt admission. sometimes i even add on another 0.35 rvu for smoking cessation




😭
 
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chessknt

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Let's add a few:
Svt ablation 19
Tavr- 25.13 - (do 4-6 per day)
Impella implant 7ish (takes 10 min)
Impella reposition 3.5ish (usually 5 min)

Compare that to 70 minute admission which is 3.5 wrvu and you realize why proceduralists make a lot more money.
Yep since the invention of the RVU 30ish years ago E/M coding has been **** upon. The pandemic leading to hospitals overflowing with patients and somehow losing money despite doing the thing they were originally created to do is a huge problem completely linked to this ****ed up system we live in since they lost the elective stuff and inflated costs in the loss leaders (ICU/medicare patients). I know it wont happen but maybe the powers that be should repeal/replace RVUs while they are overhauling healthcare to make it so hospitals/doctors can actually make money thinking instead of doing.
 
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Let's add a few:
Svt ablation 19
Tavr- 25.13 - (do 4-6 per day)
Impella implant 7ish (takes 10 min)
Impella reposition 3.5ish (usually 5 min)

Compare that to 70 minute admission which is 3.5 wrvu and you realize why proceduralists make a lot more
Yep since the invention of the RVU 30ish years ago E/M coding has been **** upon. The pandemic leading to hospitals overflowing with patients and somehow losing money despite doing the thing they were originally created to do is a huge problem completely linked to this ****ed up system we live in since they lost the elective stuff and inflated costs in the loss leaders (ICU/medicare patients). I know it wont happen but maybe the powers that be should repeal/replace RVUs while they are overhauling healthcare to make it so hospitals/doctors can actually make money thinking instead of doing.
Lol can you imagine?
- 5 RVUs for pontificating about why the O2 went from 97 to 90.
- 10 RVUs for an ABG (obtained and interpreted).
- 4 RVUs for considering the drop in sodium being from HF exacerbation
- 5 RVUs for documenting why the potassium is 3.4
- 2 RVUs for each medication added to the reconciliation.
- 1 RVU every time the hospitalist clicks the mouse.
- 50 RVUs per family meeting and code status discussion.

I would imagine NPs and PAs reaping a ton of benefits to this.
 
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