2nd Health Care Worker In Texas Gets Ebola, Nurse says there was no Protocol

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So besides the first nurse, another healthcare worker at the same Texas hospital has tested positive for Ebola. Nurse also says there were poor safety measures and the original Ebola patient sat in a waiting room for hours with other patients. The second healthcare worker to get Ebola admits she has had "contact" with other people.




welp..... I' m ready for the zombie apocalypse, don't know about ya'll


http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/texas-dept-2nd-person-tests-positive-for-ebola/ar-AA6SRUV
 
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So the second nurse who got ebola, got on a plane and flew to another state. Now they are trying to round up the people who were next to her on the plane. o_O, wtf.
 
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cbrons

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So the second nurse who got ebola, got on a plane a flew to another state. Now they are trying to round up the people who were next to her on the plane. o_O, wtf.
She got on the plane with a low-grade fever, meaning the virus was outside of the cell and she was at a stage where she could easily transmit it.

Also I read the plane she flew on subsequently made 5 trips before the flat-footed, ineffectual, overpaid, government ******S realized what had happened.

Up to me? Top CDC officials immediately to prison, do not pass GO.

How in the world can these idiots at the CDC ass/u/me that the coupon clippers in East Texas can be left to their own devices handling this? The CDC director had the gall to actually say that any hospital in the country is equipped to handle Ebola-infected patients. Obviously part of being equipped does not include health care professionals who know basic droplet/contact precautions.

Here is what the schmuck CDC director said:

"We could've sent a more robust hospital infection control team and been more hands-on with the hospital from day one about exactly how this should be managed," he said Tuesday.

DERP A DERP no duh? How did the nurse get the disease? It's not exactly easy to get. In Sierra Leone where its over 100 degrees, there's no AC and you basically have a large group of infected people defecating in holes in a shoddy quarantine camp - I can see it happening there quite easily.
 

emedpa

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DERP A DERP no duh? How did the nurse get the disease? It's not exactly easy to get. .
um, well...
From the NYT 10/14 about viral load, stage of disease and contagion:
The researchers at Emory tested patients and found high levels of the virus in their body fluids and even on their skin.
At the peak of illness, an Ebola patient can have 10 billion viral particles in one-fifth of a teaspoon of blood. That compares with 50,000 to 100,000 particles in an untreated H.I.V. patient, and five million to 20 million in someone with untreated hepatitis C.
 
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SouthernSurgeon

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Kaustikos

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Ok,
You guys must not work in a hospital if you seem to be all shocked she was able to travel or that she wasn't isolated. The reality is probably never going to be spoken but the time frame from someone admitting they went to this place and everyone thinking Ebola leaves plenty of time for more than one to two nurses to come in contact with the patient. We're talking at least 20 people and not just hospital personal. This isn't a cdc or government issue. They reacted when things presented. The question is how long did it actually take before everyone came to the realization of this. Communication in a hospital isn't 100% so I'm not surprised some people slipped through the cracks.
You want to have contact isolation for every patient with low grade fever? That's what they do with inpatient... "HE HAS CDIFF!!!!!! "
 

SouthernSurgeon

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Ok,
You guys must not work in a hospital if you seem to be all shocked she was able to travel or that she wasn't isolated. The reality is probably never going to be spoken but the time frame from someone admitting they went to this place and everyone thinking Ebola leaves plenty of time for more than one to two nurses to come in contact with the patient. We're talking at least 20 people and not just hospital personal. This isn't a cdc or government issue. They reacted when things presented. The question is how long did it actually take before everyone came to the realization of this. Communication in a hospital isn't 100% so I'm not surprised some people slipped through the cracks.
You want to have contact isolation for every patient with low grade fever? That's what they do with inpatient... "HE HAS CDIFF!!!!!! "
No.

She was in, per the CDC, "extensive contact" with Duncan from Sept 28-30, when he had "extensive production of bodily fluids".

She was a known risk and was being monitored.

Isolation wasn't called for for any of the healthcare workers because (it was presumed) they had adequate PPE. We now know that they didn't have adequate PPE, but that's another matter.

She should never have been allowed to travel as she was already under CDC monitoring and in fact called to report her early fever before getting on the plane (and whoever she talked to at CDC told her to go ahead).

This is absolutely a government and CDC failure of containment.
 
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um, well...
From the NYT 10/14 about viral load, stage of disease and contagion:
The researchers at Emory tested patients and found high levels of the virus in their body fluids and even on their skin.
At the peak of illness, an Ebola patient can have 10 billion viral particles in one-fifth of a teaspoon of blood. That compares with 50,000 to 100,000 particles in an untreated H.I.V. patient, and five million to 20 million in someone with untreated hepatitis C.
I'm not certain of the specifics of Ebola, but viral load is only one component of determining how likely it is to infect a new host. Route of infection, number of functional viral particles, how common the viral receptors are, the immune status of the exposed person, etc. can all play a role.

I'm also curious how they measured the viral particles, and at what stage of infection they measured them.
 

fancymylotus

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Lol at international tix to the homeland being cheaper on carriers stopping over in Africa vs anywhere else.

Not a fun time to travel ><
 

DermViser

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No.

She was in, per the CDC, "extensive contact" with Duncan from Sept 28-30, when he had "extensive production of bodily fluids".

She was a known risk and was being monitored.

Isolation wasn't called for for any of the healthcare workers because (it was presumed) they had adequate PPE. We now know that they didn't have adequate PPE, but that's another matter.

She should never have been allowed to travel as she was already under CDC monitoring and in fact called to report her early fever before getting on the plane (and whoever she talked to at CDC told her to go ahead).

This is absolutely a government and CDC failure of containment.
Wow, didn't know this behind story.