Aug 26, 2010
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Seeing as how you did not look up the word overcome, I will explain it to you in your desired analogy format. If my patient overcame his addition of Vicodin he would NOT abuse the drug even with an ample supply within his possession. If he was tempted and abused Vicodin, then NO he DID NOT overcome his addiction. So to answer your question, YES I would have no trouble prescribing a drug to a patient who OVERCAME his addition (you meant addiction I assume?).
Do you really want to take that chance? Who is going to tell you that this patient overcame this addiction and isn't at risk for relapse with your help by tempting them? You also realize that they will tell you they overcame and a small percentage may in fact relapse because of YOU and if something happens to them and you are the prescribing doctor, you're license may be at risk.

I was asked this on my oral surgical boards. Is this your final answer?

My whole point is that you seem to just lay aside a common problem that even though can be controlled, can sometime rear it's ugly head at the worst possible time. Failing a board exam CAN be about test day anxiety. Whether you decide to believe it or not.

Once you have an anxiety disorder you have it whether it's under control or not. Once an addict, always an addict. It's not about OVERCOMING, it's about MANAGING.
 
May 10, 2011
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Do you really want to take that chance? Who is going to tell you that this patient overcame this addiction and isn't at risk for relapse with your help by tempting them? You also realize that they will tell you they overcame and a small percentage may in fact relapse because of YOU and if something happens to them and you are the prescribing doctor, you're license may be at risk.

I was asked this on my oral surgical boards. Is this your final answer?

My whole point is that you seem to just lay aside a common problem that even though can be controlled, can sometime rear it's ugly head at the worst possible time. Failing a board exam CAN be about test day anxiety. Whether you decide to believe it or not.

Once you have an anxiety disorder you have it whether it's under control or not. Once an addict, always an addict. It's not about OVERCOMING, it's about MANAGING.
Realize that my response was based on YOUR criteria that you had posted prior. If you had included all this additional information, my response would have been different. Also, had you have said managing, this lengthy conversation would have been even more trivial then it already was.

Pick your words carefully as I have no problem in pointing out what I find to be discrepancies.
 
Aug 26, 2010
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Realize that my response was based on YOUR criteria that you had posted prior. If you had included all this additional information, my response would have been different. Also, had you have said managing, this lengthy conversation would have been even more trivial then it already was.

Pick your words carefully as I have no problem in pointing out what I find to be discrepancies.
You are using semantics to pad your argument. You defined "overcome" in this instance.

With your ideology then nobody can overcome an addiction or an anxiety disorder. There are no guarantees that there will not be relapse or regression EVER.

That being said I think it's prudent to be extremely careful when considering prescribing narcotics for your patients. You ARE on the hook regardless of what your definitions are.
 
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May 10, 2011
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You are using semantics to pad your argument. You defined "overcome" in this instance.

With your ideology then nobody can overcome an addiction or an anxiety disorder. There are no guarantees that there will not be relapse or regression EVER.

That being said I think it's prudent to be extremely careful when considering prescribing narcotics for your patients. You ARE on the hook regardless of what your definitions are.
Let me ask you this Kidsfeet. What makes you so different from the vast majority who at one point suffered a form of test anxiety? MOST of us have experienced a form of test anxiety at one point in our lives, be it mild or severe. The majority of us have found ways to cope and deal with this anxiety similiar to what you have done. Now, what makes you SO special that you absolutely, without a doubt, STILL suffer from test anxiety even when you pass ALL your exams.

With all these digressions aside, my argument is simple. Test anxiety is only a problem IF it affects your life negatively. In your case, you have never, ever failed an exam, therefore you do NOT have a PROBLEM with test anxiety. What is so difficult to understand here? Maybe an analogy will help. Drug addiction is only a problem if one relapses correct? Lets compare this to your situation. Does an addict who NEVER EVER relapses have a problem with drug addiction in a way that impacts their life negatively? NO
 
Jul 19, 2011
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If undiagnosed and no coping mechanisms taught, "test anxiety" can be a serious hurdle even for the brightest students. I have a serious case of it, but was taught tricks to overcome it, and never failed a board exam, ever. It IS out there and is extremely relevant.
Hmmm.. I'm curious so I'll bite. What tricks do you recommend to overcome test anxiety? I'm pretty sure my friend (not me nope :laugh:) could use the advice! PM me if you prefer.
 
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SuperFeisty

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Jun 21, 2011
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I don't understand what this sort of test anxiety means? I mean, who isn't incredibly nervous and stressed out going INTO a test. However, if you've prepared well, you should be able to look at the questions and know how to answer them, thus alleviating a lot of that stress... My parents have always taught me that if you prepare well enough, you can do anything well...
 
Jul 19, 2011
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I don't understand what this sort of test anxiety means? I mean, who isn't incredibly nervous and stressed out going INTO a test. However, if you've prepared well, you should be able to look at the questions and know how to answer them, thus alleviating a lot of that stress... My parents have always taught me that if you prepare well enough, you can do anything well...
I think we all get nervous and stressed out before big tests. I think it becomes problematic when you let that anxiety itself affect your performance (or preparation) for the exam in question. For example, you're so nervous you blank on things you should know. Or you don't sleep well the night before because you can't fall asleep...etc. I'm sure there are many more examples.
 

PADPM

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If undiagnosed and no coping mechanisms taught, "test anxiety" can be a serious hurdle even for the brightest students. I have a serious case of it, but was taught tricks to overcome it, and never failed a board exam, ever. It IS out there and is extremely relevant.
Sorry Kidsfeet, but I've taught you to NEVER say NEVER and as one of your mentor's I've got to spank you once in a while. You may be pissed at me for this, but here it goes.........

If I didn't find it, someone else would.

This is your quote from Januray 22, 2011:

I agree for the most part.

Here's where I differ. Wth does RRA really do for anyone? Why is there even that distinction?

Three years for all. One Board, One College. No confusion. You want more training? Have those that do the more complex stuff (Rob Mendicino for instance) start specialty fellowships for complex procedures like Tibial Transpositions blah, blah, blah.

What NONE of this addressed yet is the state of privileging and scope of practice. So you do a fancy PMSR with RRA and then decide to move to CT. You're SOL. What if the community you move to stil have issues with Podiatrists doing bunions and hammertoes (yes those still exist)? If you come into my community with 3 years of training, Board Qualified in Foot, no hospital will stop you from doing ANYTHING you want F&A EXCEPT TAR. I did 3 years, couldn't pass the RRA exam for my life. I can treat Pilon Fractures with ex-fix in any hospital in my community. I felt three years was enough to have confidence in dealing with patients in the office and in the OR. As Podfather mentioned in a previous post, he knows who I did my residency with and knows I have solid training. How many rearfoot procedures do you really think your going to do in practice that require that RRA certificate? Just saying.
 
Aug 26, 2010
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Sorry Kidsfeet, but I've taught you to NEVER say NEVER and as one of your mentor's I've got to spank you once in a while. You may be pissed at me for this, but here it goes.........

If I didn't find it, someone else would.

This is your quote from Januray 22, 2011:

I agree for the most part.

Here's where I differ. Wth does RRA really do for anyone? Why is there even that distinction?

Three years for all. One Board, One College. No confusion. You want more training? Have those that do the more complex stuff (Rob Mendicino for instance) start specialty fellowships for complex procedures like Tibial Transpositions blah, blah, blah.

What NONE of this addressed yet is the state of privileging and scope of practice. So you do a fancy PMSR with RRA and then decide to move to CT. You're SOL. What if the community you move to stil have issues with Podiatrists doing bunions and hammertoes (yes those still exist)? If you come into my community with 3 years of training, Board Qualified in Foot, no hospital will stop you from doing ANYTHING you want F&A EXCEPT TAR. I did 3 years, couldn't pass the RRA exam for my life. I can treat Pilon Fractures with ex-fix in any hospital in my community. I felt three years was enough to have confidence in dealing with patients in the office and in the OR. As Podfather mentioned in a previous post, he knows who I did my residency with and knows I have solid training. How many rearfoot procedures do you really think your going to do in practice that require that RRA certificate? Just saying.
You are absolutely right! Not pissed at all. I can honestly say that I failed that exam because I wasn't exposed to many of the procedures on that examination and not because of "test anxiety". I apologize for my transgression.

One thing that I can say is that although I did fail that examination, it did not prevent me from becoming Board Certified, as you MUST pass the Foot Surgery portion of the test to get your Certification status. What I should have said was that I hadn't failed any required board examinations.

Thanks for pointing that out and you're right. You DO have to spank me once in awhile;).
 

PADPM

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Glad you took it like a man! You KNOW I remember everything I read, hear, etc.,........except the important stuff.:D
 
May 17, 2010
15
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Pre-Podiatry
Seriously??? 16??? You are in the 8th percentile.Just posting here is an insult DON'T EVEN APPLY. You don't even have a shot at an interview. Shame on any school for even thinking of accepting a student with a 16 MCAT and then kicking him/her because of a poor performance.
Wrong. A friend of mine got a 17 on the MCAT, and got an interview already. Good luck.

If your other stats outweigh the low MCAT, miracles can happen.
 
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