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3.45 cum, 3.2ish bcpm- Pls help with chances!

Discussion in 'What Are My Chances?' started by anon1214, Dec 30, 2008.

  1. anon1214

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    I am a JR.
    Right now my grades are the weakest part of the app. I'm not sure if I should spend time studying for the MCAT or start studying for the GRE so that i can get my masters in something and boost my gpa.

    Do I have a chance with a 3.2ish bcpm?
    gen chem- A,A-
    Biochem- C+, retaking it
    Neurobiology- C, planning to retake
    Physics- haven't taken yet
    Org Chem- B, B+
    Stats: a-
    calcs: ap cred, A, A-
    Bio- B, B-
    other classes i have not included.

    I have research experience with publications (paper, poster, also made my own poster for another project), some shadowing (not that much), some other various ecs that are not med related. Also am a TA for chem.

    QUESTION: Please help me!!! I don't know if I should plan on grad school or med school! Is there any hope at all for me applying straight out of undergrad (I plan to take a year off either way to apply so my sr grades count since i have not taken physics)? Or should I plan on applying to a grad program?? ahhhhhhhhhh
     
    #1 anon1214, Dec 30, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
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  3. ChemEngMD

    ChemEngMD No need to hide behind private profiles
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    First, calm down. Now, a 3.2 is not a death sentence especially considering if u were to pull As in both of your Physics classes it could come up to what maybe a 3.3? It isn't great, so maybe a special health masters program would be better for you considering you don't have a lot of clinical experience. You could also consider taking an extra year to take some post-bac non-degree courses to up your gpa and meanwhile do some shadowing and what not. While the research experience is good, the schools that would be most interested in that are probably out of your grade range.

    There is also the oppurtunity that if you somehow pulled an incredible score on your MCATs (how you would do this without a Physics background is beyond me, but hey you never know) like a 37+ that you could get in with a 3.3ish BCPM. It's really dependent, but if you wanna play it safe I'd say either A) wait til end of your senior year to get the grades up or B) consider a post-bac program
     
  4. Mobius1985

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    If you can see yourself being happy doing anything else besides medicine, then go for a traditional masters degree. Getting one will not improve your undergrad GPA, by which you will be primarily judged by admissions committees (along with MCAT score). The graduate school GPA is listed separately on the application form.

    Considering you have essentially no clinical experience (except for a bit of shadowing), your GPA is not the weakest part of your application. Even if you had a GPA of 4.0, adcomms won't accept someone who has no experience with face-to-face interactions with sick people.

    All that said, there is still hope for an admission to an allopathic (MD) medical school, if (assuming your cGPA is from five semesters): 1) you get straight As the next three semesters before applying which will boost your cGPA to a 3.65, 2) get an MCAT score of 31+, and 3) start a clinical volunteering gig ASAP as 1.5 years of ongoing experience (both altruistic and clinically-oriented) is what adcomms will prefer to see on your application. You could even get some A-s and still make it with a higher MCAT score.

    A formal post-bac program (expensive) or informal post-bac (taking classes on your own through a local university)is another way to boost your undergrad GPA if you've graduated, but since you have 1.5 years of classes yet to go which can get your GPA up, I wouldn't consider this just yet.

    An exception to the rule that a masters degree won't help your application, is to apply for an SMP (Special Masters Program) specifically meant to redeem a poor GPA, but you'd need to get a reasonable MCAT score to get in. And honestly, your GPA isn't so low that you need to consider resorting to that (expensive) extreme yet. This option also requires you to perform briliiantly to succeed, and it is extremely competitive.

    If you can't cut it when it comes to getting great grades, you can apply to DO (osteopathic) medical schools which are more forgiving about academics. Their application service will substitute any retaken grade for the original when figuring out your application GPA. Their average acceptee has an GPA of 3.4, so with an MCAT of 24+ you could apply and get accepted, provided you also get in a decent amount of clinical volunteering before you submit.
     
  5. RecyclingBinh

    RecyclingBinh Class of 2014 hopeful!
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    I am in the same situation. I am a Junior with a GPA around there (3.4). I never had a C in a science course so I think a C would look really bad. I only had 2 C's and that was in Cal 2 & 3 which I think they won't take much into consideration. If you show sign of GPA increase it will look great. If you go up and down every semester it won't look pretty.

    I live in Texas and was told by a doctor, she used to be an admissions member for Baylor College of medicine, that getting a GPA around 3.3 is ok but you need to kill on the MCAT. Getting a 30+ will help your chances because I believe that is aroung 89-90 percentile.

    If you make the GPA and MCAt cutoff set by the Dean of admissions then they will look at your application. When they look at you app and you have great ec activities, research, volunteering, and exposure to the medical field you will get an interview.

    I haven't taken the MCAT yet but will in April. Try signing up for a prep course to help you get that 30+ on the MCAT.

    Bon chance!
     
  6. MedMan25

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    If you did well on the MCAT you would definitely have a chance at several schools, especially with your research experience. Even if you scored less than a 30 you would still have a shot at some DO schools and possibly your states public MD school (unless you're from CA).

    I think the real decision you need to make is whether or not medicine is right for you, not whether or not you can get in. Assuming you don't totally bomb the MCAT, you should be able to get in somewhere. Get some more clinical experience (which will also help your app) and really make a commitment to medicine before you start spending $$$ on the expensive application process. Once you know medicine is right for you then go for it. Your stats aren't that bad.
     
  7. MedMan25

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    And since you're not going to be applying until 2010 (if I read your post right) then you definitely should not be stressing about MCAT vs GRE. You'll have plenty of time to study for those tests when the time comes regardless of what decision you make. Take the time now to focus on what you really want to do and go from there.
     
  8. anon1214

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    thanks guys this is helpful. i think i am considering a master's program because i'm not sure i want to do med. but i don't think i would be happy doing research forever. i had originally wanted to apply to md/phd but i don't think my gpa is high enough to even consider that at this point. so i feel like i need to choose between med or research

    i think i will try doing some clinical volunteering along with research this summer
     
  9. anon1214

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    If i want to go to school straight out of undergrad dont I need to take the GRE's by this summer? so i can apply in fall?
     
  10. WeAreNotRobots

    WeAreNotRobots doctor of medicine
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    you do know that a grad program won't influence your undergrad GPA, right?
     
  11. anon1214

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    yeah i know. i am trying to decide if i should still try for med school or if my gpa is just too low and i should put more efforts into a diff career path.
     
  12. Mobius1985

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    The take home message here is that if you want to be a doctor badly enough, and are willing to put in the work, you can still make it happen. You are in a much better position right now than many others who belatedly decided to go down this path, but ultimately succeeded..
     
  13. Nasem

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    to be perfectly honest with you, allopathic medical schools today in the U.S are sooo competitive that a 3.2 science and 3.4 is just not enough, anyway you spin it, its just not competitive. If your a JR today, you still have 1 year left, if you can 4.0 you next few semesters, you can bring those GPAs at an OK level, plus it will show a nice upward trend ....

    to be honest, when a school gets 6000+ applications every cycle, I HIGHLY doubt they are going to look at every single thing on your application, like shadowing, upward trend, volunteering, research, etc.... there is just not enough time to review EVERY angle possible for every application.... I think the biggest and first thing they look at is ur GPAs and MCAT, if they don't like what they see, they don't go further into your application

    Believe me, it hurts me to admit it, because I am a non-trad with a 3.2 overall and approx 3.6 science and every allopathic medical school I talk to, the first thing they say is "oh, well, our average is 3.6, so that 3.2 is kinda low".... Even though I am showing a nice upward trend (2 year post-bacc so far with 32 credits, straight 4.0)....

    I don't really like the idea that if you have a low GPA you can make it up with a strong MCAT (obviously, the only way this is true is if you start busting out scores higher than 35 or 36, which to be honest, its not easy, actually, pretty difficult to achieve), its (in my opinion) easier to keep your GPAs higher than 3.5 than to get a 35+ on the MCATs

    One huge thing to consider is state of residency, if your in a state that accepts majority of thier med students from that state itself, you stand a pretty good chance, even with your lower than average numbers.

    Also, as someone else mentioned, osteopathic schools are a better fit for a pre-med with lower numbers, Actually, it would be an honor for me to get accepted into an osteopathic program, no shame in pursuing your dreams if you truly wanna be a "doctor"
     
  14. flip26

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    You don't have the "fire in the belly" that is necessary for anyone to go through this process, especially someone digging out of a GPA hole...you probably should look elsewhere for another career path.

    As for your GPA: you are correct that your BCPM is very low, especially in the pre-reqs. in your remaining semesters, how many upper level sciences do you plan to take? It is critical that you make As in these to provide some offset to the lousy pre-req grades.
     
  15. anon1214

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    If I get straight a's in the rest of the classes I take, I can end up with a 3.6 cum and a 3.55 bcpm. But I'm not a robot.
     
  16. 202781

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    Option 1: Spend a year getting a bunch of A/A- grades. Apply at the end of your senior year. Get a 30+ MCAT and you will be golden. (You will have to take a year off though)


    Option 2: Take the MCAT, Hope for a 34+ and take your chances (3.4 is not that bad if you can get your grades up just a little)


    Option 3: Keep getting the grades you are getting then do a masters program to get your grades up (3.7+), Take the MCAT (30+) and get into medical school.


    Option 4: Just say F it and go DO or go to dental school/podiatry school. Your grades would be fine and you would only need like a 25+ on the MCAT to have a good shot at DO, a 17+ on the MCAT for podiatry, or an 18 on the DAT for dental


    I would go option 2 and if you get an MCAT score you dont like spend a year getting your grades up and do option 1.
     
  17. tmoney

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    one would be hard pressed to get into a pod school with 3.2sci and a 17 mcat
     

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