Jul 26, 2015
13
7
with a 3.77 (according to the calculation I got at the U of C) and a 126 in CARS, what are my chances in general?

I got quite a few ECs-- three years of research, three years of hospital volunteering, three years of volunteering at the campus newspaper (with various exec positions), two years of head coaching a basketball team at my old school, teaching english in Japan this fall, etc.


I think the GPA that OMSAS gave me was 3.71
 

NewHorizons

2+ Year Member
May 20, 2015
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with a 3.77 (according to the calculation I got at the U of C) and a 126 in CARS, what are my chances in general?

I got quite a few ECs-- three years of research, three years of hospital volunteering, three years of volunteering at the campus newspaper (with various exec positions), two years of head coaching a basketball team at my old school, teaching english in Japan this fall, etc.


I think the GPA that OMSAS gave me was 3.71

Your AMCAS GPA will be calculated differently than your UofC or UofA GPA. UofC also rounds up to the 0.01 place while many schools don't. UofC also allows you to omit a year if you have completed >=4 more years of schooling by the end of the cycle whereas AMCAS doesn't allow for that. Furthermore an A and A+ are differentiated whereas Western Canadian universities generally don't (except for some schools using a percent system instead).

Unlike the UofC many other schools look at the whole thing, but your CARS alone is not impressive as an international student trying to get into an American medical school. Your composite score however is quite nice so you have a better chance there. Your biggest barrier by far is your GPA as an international student.

Did you submit your primary and secondaries yet? If you haven't done that with your lower stats then your chances become near none, even with above average ECs.

You can still try and all the power to you. From my point of view I wouldn't be optimistic especially if you haven't submitted anything to AMCAS yet. I only know of one person who submitted in October/November that got into an American medical school but they had a 3.9 and a 39 MCAT so.....

Best wishes,
 
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GrapesofRath

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May 5, 2015
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1) There are 62 schools that take internationals.
2) Identify the ones that have taken the most the past few years. Remove any that haven't taken any in the past 2+years.
3) Look at the school's MCAT medians. Remove all where the median is higher than yours.

Apply to the rest and call it a list. Focus your time on those with medians below yours(think 31-33) range.
 
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OP
D
Jul 26, 2015
13
7
I wasn't going to apply to any American schools actually-- I was just wondering what the expertise of y'all was, for those who went to Canadian schools.
 
OP
D
Jul 26, 2015
13
7
That list of 60 schools thing is super informative though. If I don't get into any Canadian schools this year, I'm going to apply to a ton of American schools, depending on whether I need to re-write my MCAT or not.
 

NotASerialKiller

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Jul 7, 2015
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Your biggest barrier by far is your GPA as an international student.
Have you ever gotten official word on how any school treats Canadian applicants? All the common advice is to compare your stats to the medians on the MSAR, but that GPA is obviously from American students. I've been told that in theory they wouldn't treat us any differently, and people on SDN say "Oh yeah with that 3.81 you're golden, apply broadly" but surely adcoms notice that 80% of Canadian applicants have a 3.9+. I have no idea if that translates to them not really caring as much about our GPAs because they're high for all Canadians, or them giving priority to the 3.9+ ones thereby making it near impossible for a 3.7 like it is in Canada.

Not sure if there's an answer to that question can even be found, but I've always wondered.
 

GrapesofRath

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May 5, 2015
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Have you ever gotten official word on how any school treats Canadian applicants? All the common advice is to compare your stats to the medians on the MSAR, but that GPA is obviously from American students. I've been told that in theory they wouldn't treat us any differently, and people on SDN say "Oh yeah with that 3.81 you're golden, apply broadly" but surely adcoms notice that 80% of Canadian applicants have a 3.9+. I have no idea if that translates to them not really caring as much about our GPAs because they're high for all Canadians, or them giving priority to the 3.9+ ones thereby making it near impossible for a 3.7 like it is in Canada.

Not sure if there's an answer to that question can even be found, but I've always wondered.
Goro will often tell you the Canadian students need stats that US citizens would need for MD/PhD schools to be competitive for MD programs in the US. The average MD/PhD matriculant has a 3.8/35 along with extensive research experience to give some perspective.