clumpymold

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I believe the MCAT is out of 45, correct? I have RARELY seen any score above a 40 (seen a couple 40s). How common is this? How difficult is this? Anyone have a breakdown of percentages?

What does one need to get a 40+ on the MCATs?

I did, however, meet someone a LONG time ago who got a 45 on his MCAT. Super nerd though. Ended up going to Harvard Medical. :wow:
 

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R_C_Hutchinson

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there are a few people on this board with 40+ mcat scores, just not many as the test is standardized so the number of people getting such scores is very very small.
for example (i could be wrong here) the score 42 rounds to 0% getting that score. since the data is accurate to .1% that means that less than .05% got 42. for a 60000 person MCAT year (about how many took last april and august) that's roughly 30 or less getting that score.
there have been rumors about what the national high score was, but i dont think anyone has been able to come up with anything better than anecdotal evidence as to if any 45's have been had recently or not- either way, dont expect to run into one as that score would be very very rare, requiring a huge amont of knowledge and a huge amount of luck.
 
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DoctorInSpace

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One of my MCAT students scored a 42. For real. She will be attending the University of Miami this August. She put a lot of hard work into it. I'm trying to recruit her to teach, as I know she would be great.

It does happen.....
 

clumpymold

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Originally posted by R_C_Hutchinson
there are a few people on this board with 40+ mcat scores, just not many as the test is standardized so the number of people getting such scores is very very small.
for example (i could be wrong here) the score 42 rounds to 0% getting that score. since the data is accurate to .1% that means that less than .05% got 42. for a 60000 person MCAT year (about how many took last april and august) that's roughly 30 or less getting that score.
there have been rumors about what the national high score was, but i dont think anyone has been able to come up with anything better than anecdotal evidence as to if any 45's have been had recently or not- either way, dont expect to run into one as that score would be very very rare, requiring a huge amont of knowledge and a huge amount of luck.

So then you're saying even a 43+ is pretty much impossible?
 

OnMyWayThere

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Originally posted by Nutmeg
The test companies sit in, try to memorize a given section, and then void the test, but they don't get scores.

http://www.aamc.org/students/mcat/examineedata/pubs.htm has the breakdown.

Considering they're not supposed to be taking the test to begin with as it says in the disclaimer of the MCAT, it's very nice of you to give them the benefit of the doubt. I am sure not all of them void their scores BUT take home their 40+ and honor it.
 

JohnHolmes

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Post 2002, MCAT scores of 45 are near impossible to achieve. So far, no one has achieved a composite of 45 after the aug 2002 test. I would be very surprised if someone got one this cycle either.

CCW
 

clumpymold

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Originally posted by Cooper_Wriston
Post 2002, MCAT scores of 45 are near impossible to achieve. So far, no one has achieved a composite of 45 after the aug 2002 test. I would be very surprised if someone got one this cycle either.

CCW

I see. So before 2002, it was more likely? The person I spoke to who got the 45 was back around 1998 or 1999. He ended up going to Harvard medical.
 

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Here is a breakdown of the higher scores that was included with my August '03 test:

Scaled Score-% Achieving Score
45-0.0
44-0.0
43-0.0
42-0.0
41-0.1
40-0.2
39-0.4
38-0.6
37-0.9
36-1.2

The mean score was 24.7
Std Deviation=6.2

Above a forty, although not impossible, is very hard to acheive.
 

clumpymold

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Originally posted by ad_sharp
Here is a breakdown of the higher scores that was included with my August '03 test:

Scaled Score-% Achieving Score
45-0.0
44-0.0
43-0.0
42-0.0
41-0.1
40-0.2
39-0.4
38-0.6
37-0.9
36-1.2

The mean score was 24.7
Std Deviation=6.2

Above a forty, although not impossible, is very hard to acheive.

Wow. I wish they put more decimal places on those. I really would like to see, exactly, how many, if any, got 45s.
 

R_C_Hutchinson

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Originally posted by clumpymold
So then you're saying even a 43+ is pretty much impossible?

naw, not impossible, just unlikely. a person named "Pianogirl" (i think that's her screenname) and i both got 43's on the august MCAT. bear in mind, especially on these boards, that you're getting a very elite sampling of premeds- the averages for the "report your score" threads are around 32 for SDN and 24/5 nationally, so you're sitting here chatting with the most geeky 5% of premeds when you post.

If you like the big numbers bear in mind that luck has a good amount to do with it as well- people who score that high typically see a pretty big variation of scores from (practice) test to test simply because of the dicey nature of high scores- missing 10 more questions in the 20-30 range might bump you a point; doing the same if you would be getting a 45 could drop you quite a bit more.

In summary, no, high scores arent unheard of or ridiculously hard, but they're certainly the product of both skill and luck, so be happy for the guy who gets a 45 but dont feel like it means he's above and beyond all the other people getting high scores. I'll say one last thing to any who are seriously gunning for the very high scores for whatever reason: remember that when things get that high, test-taking skill is very very crucial. you will rarely if ever see someone get a 40+ without a lot of knowledge, some great test taking skills and a little luck- if your 2.5GPA needs a 40 MCAT to get into med school, be sure to read some material on test taking as well as BS/PS etc.

Finally: what you really need to do is work on your writing sample- that letter matters more than the whole of your GPA, MCAT, EC's LOR's and essays combined. no seriously. in fact those two essays are used to determine your future social standing, life partner and sense of self worth- if you dont get a "U" or better, it's time to start thinking Bohemian nursing school. ;)
 

clumpymold

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Originally posted by R_C_Hutchinson
naw, not impossible, just unlikely. a person named "Pianogirl" (i think that's her screenname) and i both got 43's on the august MCAT. bear in mind, especially on these boards, that you're getting a very elite sampling of premeds- the averages for the "report your score" threads are around 32 for SDN and 24/5 nationally, so you're sitting here chatting with the most geeky 5% of premeds when you post.

If you like the big numbers bear in mind that luck has a good amount to do with it as well- people who score that high typically see a pretty big variation of scores from (practice) test to test simply because of the dicey nature of high scores- missing 10 more questions in the 20-30 range might bump you a point; doing the same if you would be getting a 45 could drop you quite a bit more.

In summary, no, high scores arent unheard of or ridiculously hard, but they're certainly the product of both skill and luck, so be happy for the guy who gets a 45 but dont feel like it means he's above and beyond all the other people getting high scores. I'll say one last thing to any who are seriously gunning for the very high scores for whatever reason: remember that when things get that high, test-taking skill is very very crucial. you will rarely if ever see someone get a 40+ without a lot of knowledge, some great test taking skills and a little luck- if your 2.5GPA needs a 40 MCAT to get into med school, be sure to read some material on test taking as well as BS/PS etc.

Finally: what you really need to do is work on your writing sample- that letter matters more than the whole of your GPA, MCAT, EC's LOR's and essays combined. no seriously. in fact those two essays are used to determine your future social standing, life partner and sense of self worth- if you dont get a "U" or better, it's time to start thinking Bohemian nursing school. ;)

Wow, you got a 43? That's awesome!

A "U"? I don't even think I've heard that before. What's it out of again? What's the highest you've heard? What did YOU get? ;)
 

R_C_Hutchinson

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Originally posted by clumpymold
Wow, you got a 43? That's awesome!

A "U"? I don't even think I've heard that before. What's it out of again? What's the highest you've heard? What did YOU get? ;)

hahaha, it was a joke-
it is commonly held that the MCAT writing portion is worth much less in admissions than the other sections, some people even call it worthless, although there is some research out that says otherwise. a "T" is about as hard to get statistically as a 15 on any section- but it's subjective (someone reads the thing and scores it) so probably not as replicable. I got an "S".

The score is lettered from "J"(bad) to "T"(good). That's why my comment about getting a "U" was so hilarious. no really. not even a pity chuckle? dang.
 

clumpymold

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Originally posted by R_C_Hutchinson
hahaha, it was a joke-
it is commonly held that the MCAT writing portion is worth much less in admissions than the other sections, some people even call it worthless, although there is some research out that says otherwise. a "T" is about as hard to get statistically as a 15 on any section- but it's subjective (someone reads the thing and scores it) so probably not as replicable. I got an "S".

The score is lettered from "J"(bad) to "T"(good). That's why my comment about getting a "U" was so hilarious. no really. not even a pity chuckle? dang.

Oh, that's what I thought. You started to scare me a little there. I hate writing. :(

Anyway, congratulations on a VERY impressive score. Wow, 43S! Which medical school are you going to (or are going to now)?
 

R_C_Hutchinson

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Originally posted by clumpymold
Oh, that's what I thought. You started to scare me a little there. I hate writing. :(

Anyway, congratulations on a VERY impressive score. Wow, 43S! Which medical school are you going to (or are going to now)?

sorry if i scared ya- i thought everyone would read the "future social standing, life partner and sense of self worth" part and know i was being off handed, but maybe not. I'm not in med school now and I'll be applying this coming june. I really have no idea where I want to go- for me the people aspect of a program is paramount so i'll probably go where i like the people best and respect them most (and get in, of course); whether that ends up being a big name or a no-name doesnt really matter, so long as i can see myself enjoying my 6+ years there.
 

clumpymold

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Originally posted by R_C_Hutchinson
sorry if i scared ya- i thought everyone would read the "future social standing, life partner and sense of self worth" part and know i was being off handed, but maybe not. I'm not in med school now and I'll be applying this coming june. I really have no idea where I want to go- for me the people aspect of a program is paramount so i'll probably go where i like the people best and respect them most (and get in, of course); whether that ends up being a big name or a no-name doesnt really matter, so long as i can see myself enjoying my 6+ years there.

Haha, yeah, I read that and thought that maybe you were just overexaggerating. As if it WAS important, but you wanted to overemphasize. Anyway, that's awesome that you have so many options available to you. Any school that doesn't accept you is at a huge loss. Seriously. I would love to get into any school, honestly. I have a long journey ahead of me and I need to get my butt together and study. It's just so hard to when you've been out of it for so long. :(
 

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Originally posted by OnMyWayThere
Considering they're not supposed to be taking the test to begin with as it says in the disclaimer of the MCAT, it's very nice of you to give them the benefit of the doubt. I am sure not all of them void their scores BUT take home their 40+ and honor it.

They aren't there to take the test, they're there to memorize it. That's quite different. That means first and foremost, only those who are there to memorize the bio section would be there all day. If you're going to try to memorize a test, you gotta leave as soon as you finish your assigned section and go write that s*** down. Secondly, they would get the people who were best at memorization, which isn't necessarily the kind of attribute that the best test-takers would have. And finally, to take a test and do well, you have to spend a minimal amount of time on the easy problems and a good deal of time on the harder ones. Test memorizers don't have the luxury of budgeting their time like that. Besides, I doubt that they would have a single person memorize all 70-odd questions in the bio section, so they probably get people to do a specific part, and then they try to piece it all together.

No way is a person going to memorize a huge chunk of the MCAT and then go on to finish the test and get a 40+. If they do, they deserve that score. I seriously doubt anyone has ever gone to take the test for a test company, successfully memorized their assigned bit, and managed to turn in the test for grading and get a good score. I'd be willing to bet money that it hasn't happened. If their ego drove them to take the test seriously enough to do well, they probably didn't do a good job with the chore they were assigned to do.
 

Nutmeg

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Originally posted by clumpymold
I see. So before 2002, it was more likely? The person I spoke to who got the 45 was back around 1998 or 1999. He ended up going to Harvard medical.

Back in them days, the highest score on the VR section was "13-15", meaning that if your score was PS 15, BS 15, VR 13-15 you got a 45. Now, you are far less likely to get that 15 in VR and get the other two fifteens--by my estimation, about 18 fold less likely in the post 2002 era. I know my score would be two points higher if I took it the previous August.
 

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Originally posted by Nutmeg
They aren't there to take the test, they're there to memorize it. That's quite different. That means first and foremost, only those who are there to memorize the bio section would be there all day. If you're going to try to memorize a test, you gotta leave as soon as you finish your assigned section and go write that s*** down. Secondly, they would get the people who were best at memorization, which isn't necessarily the kind of attribute that the best test-takers would have. And finally, to take a test and do well, you have to spend a minimal amount of time on the easy problems and a good deal of time on the harder ones. Test memorizers don't have the luxury of budgeting their time like that. Besides, I doubt that they would have a single person memorize all 70-odd questions in the bio section, so they probably get people to do a specific part, and then they try to piece it all together.

No way is a person going to memorize a huge chunk of the MCAT and then go on to finish the test and get a 40+. If they do, they deserve that score. I seriously doubt anyone has ever gone to take the test for a test company, successfully memorized their assigned bit, and managed to turn in the test for grading and get a good score. I'd be willing to bet money that it hasn't happened. If their ego drove them to take the test seriously enough to do well, they probably didn't do a good job with the chore they were assigned to do.

Interesting analysis Nutmeg. But I thought AAMC were trying to sue Kaplan for allegedly being involved in a similar case (like you just discussed)? Probably has to send moles to test prep companies.
 
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