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A couple questions regarding Public Medical Schools...

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chrisski

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What schools did you contact. Penn obviously doesn't care, since its private, however I am nearly positive that Penn state does. Perhaps you worded it poorly when you asked.
 

Moonglow

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All state schools have requirements to take a percentage of instate students, and some applicants can get "caught up in the numbers".

Also, all adcoms work on a process of getting a "well-rounded" class, something like:

~ 50% male to female ratio
~ certain % from their favored undergraduate schools
~ a certain % of students at a specific age
~ a certain % foreign
~ a certain %, white, asian, black, indian, european, hispanic, etc. (This is regionally affected, eg. schools in Texas and Florida want Spanish speakers.)

There are many qualities that adcoms look for in any student, but they rarely favor one student over another on objective criteria.
 
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dude1344

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So there is no explicit preference that is enjoyed by in-state applicants, but there is a de facto advantage to being in-state and applying to a public school, due to these quotas. I could see how this isn't something that would really be plastered on a website, or would be willingly discussed will prospective students.

That being said, does anyone know how far the definition of residency can be stretched?

Realistically, I've been a resident of PA for 22 of my 23 years, and Massachusetts won't "adopt" me for another 4 yrs... So am I stuck in limbo, or would I be able to get away with claiming residency in PA?

You are a U.S. citizen and have been living here correct? Then you must have a home state. If you're not a resident of MA by their rules, you still are a PA resident until you fulfill another state's residency requirements.
 

capricia

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Residency for schooling isn't necesarily the same as residency in general. On Penn State's registrar for the bursar it clearly states you can be a legal resident of a state and not be considered a resident for tuition purposes (and therefore not reaping the benefits of the quotas I wouldl imagine). So definitely check this stuff out to be sure.
 

TheMightySmiter

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Don't worry, OP, the state of Pennsylvania is weird about in-state residency preference. PA doesn't really have state schools, it has something slightly more private than that. Kind of halfway between a state school and a private school. I know it has a name but I can't remember what it is. Apparently they're kind of touchy about it, or something.
 

softmed

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Unless you've changed where you vote or changed your license just put down your parents address (assuming they live in Pennsylvania). I know in NY you need to produce a certificate of residency from your local county government. If you can do that (ie they don't know you've moved) for Pennsylvania then you're good.
 

H2O2

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These were my thoughts (and hopes..) intially as well. But...



The kicker is that I had to change my driver's license/voter registration in order to get an apartment up here...

In the spirit of the former quote, do you guys think ADCOMS would raise an eyebrow to me calling myself a PA resident, while not actually possessing official residency?

If my current state's education system won't recognize my resident status, doesn't it make sense to for me to claim my original state as "home"?

I don't think you're going to be a PA resident now that you have a MA license and voter registration. You are "state-less" for admissions purpose, which sucks (I was nearly in the same boat as you).

Anyhow, you are in luck because at least you are missing out on being a Pennsylvania resident...which probably won't help you with Pitt or UPenn, or Temple/Drexel either. It'd be another matter if you were moving from a different state like Ohio, Texas, or Florida where you'd get major points for being a resident. It looks like being a PA resident wouldn't have helped you significantly anyway.

Just apply to a lot of schools and I wouldn't worry about it.
 

edmadison

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Ah the eternal residency quesiton, if you do a search, you'll see this addressed many many many times.

First, the legal word is domicile. You can only have a single legal domicile. You change your domicile when you a present in a state with the intention to remain there indefinitely. Although this sounds rather open ended, it really isn't. There are some exceptions (members of the military), but they are fairly narrow. If you are an adult, out of college and move somewhere to take a job, you have almost certainly changed your domicile to that new state. In OPs case, the is no question that he/she is now domiciled in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

The fun thing is that despite Article IV, Section 2 of the United States Consitution, the Supreme Court has said that states can treat new residents differently. Most states have only a one year waiting period to aquire in-state benefits, while the Commenweath is rather draconian with five years.

The great caveat to all this, is that typically the admissions/financial aid office makes the call. Often times they are a little looser with the rules than the strict letter of the law. Best thing to do is apply and upon acceptance, talk to the financial aid office.

Ed
 
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