GoSpursGo

Allons-y!
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Hi there :)

I'm pleased to announce that dyachei and alliecat44 have graciously agreed to join the volunteer team as assistant moderators in the Pre-Veterinary and Veterinary forums :D Let the party commence :hardy:
 

zeebra44

Frito feet!
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Hi there :)

I'm pleased to announce that dyachei and alliecat44 have graciously agreed to join the volunteer team as assistant moderators in the Pre-Veterinary and Veterinary forums :D Let the party commence :hardy:
Go Spurs Go!? Are you from San Antonio!?
 

GoSpursGo

Allons-y!
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Go Spurs Go!? Are you from San Antonio!?
Why, yes I am. Currently in Houston for school, but my heart will always be in SA :D
 

alliecat44

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Thanks, GoSpursGo!

I'm on vacation in Florida for the next few days (last...vacation...EVER! well, for a few years, at least) so am a bit slow with the internets til Sunday, but am really looking forward to it. :)

Yay dyachei! Congrats! :highfive:
 

zeebra44

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Why, yes I am. Currently in Houston for school, but my heart will always be in SA :D
Woo! I just ate at Taco Cabana last night, hahaha
 
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Biopsies are usually live animals! Just parts of them! LOL

Anatomic pathology is sort of the in-depth study of disease progression and manifestation at an internal (ie necropsy) and cellular (histopathology, immunohistochemistry, etc) level. We are less interested in treatment and more interested on the physiologic and molecular processes behind disease. We do necropsies and biopsies, histology, etc and many are heavily involved with research esp. neoplasia. So we are the people that have the "last word" on why an animal died, plus when you have that dog with a huge tumor, and you have no idea if it is totally benign or highly malignant, or the cat with chronic GI disease that you just can't figure out, you sample it and send it to us - we tell you! We are the sort of the detectives of medicine lol. No one cares what we wear to work, we make bad jokes, think mixed mammary tumors just look really stinkin cool, and like using sharp objects ;)
 

twelvetigers

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Or you could take an aspirate instead and send it to your favorite CLINICAL pathologist... you know, on a neat little slide. ;)
 
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Or you could take an aspirate instead and send it to your favorite CLINICAL pathologist... you know, on a neat little slide. ;)

Psh whatever, those grease monkeys :laugh: !! They get oil on my 40!! Kidding, kidding. I worked at my schools clin path lab for a year and a half, deciding between clinical and anatomic was tough...I think it was histo versus cyto that tipped me. But the "instant gratification" you can get from aspirates (as opposed to having to wait for a biopsy to be fixed, process, etc) is wonderful!
 

twelvetigers

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They're so similar, really. You guys get paid more generally, but you have to mess with dead stuff (or, as you said, pieces of things that are still alive). The worst clinpaths get is probably extra rank fluids to make a cytospin from.
 

StartingoverVet

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Biopsies are usually live animals! Just parts of them! LOL

Anatomic pathology is sort of the in-depth study of disease progression and manifestation at an internal (ie necropsy) and cellular (histopathology, immunohistochemistry, etc) level. We are less interested in treatment and more interested on the physiologic and molecular processes behind disease. We do necropsies and biopsies, histology, etc and many are heavily involved with research esp. neoplasia. So we are the people that have the "last word" on why an animal died, plus when you have that dog with a huge tumor, and you have no idea if it is totally benign or highly malignant, or the cat with chronic GI disease that you just can't figure out, you sample it and send it to us - we tell you! We are the sort of the detectives of medicine lol. No one cares what we wear to work, we make bad jokes, think mixed mammary tumors just look really stinkin cool, and like using sharp objects ;)
Thanks for the explanation. As I have said many times and will say many many more... I have much to learn.
 
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The worst clinpaths get is probably extra rank fluids to make a cytospin from.

Mmmm chunkies:hardy: I do really admire CP people though - cytology is way cool and hard. I just did a clin path rotation before this current one and it rocked!

Yeah...I have done a few really rank blown-up horses that had been out in the field last summer for a day or two before the owners went huh, lets bring em in. I have a high gross-out tolerance, but when you have to wear a facemask to prevent poppage-induced splatter :eek: I'll just stop now before I drive *everyone* away from the profession lol
 

twelvetigers

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I think it's like a badge of honor - "Nah man, that doesn't gross me out. Now this one time, there was a cow, and it was ________, now THAT was gross."

I love pathologists - it's like they almost always have this epic sense of humor. I recall a few rounds of "here, smell this" going on in the lab before with a disgusting TTW or something. And the one time that the lab tech got Dr. _____ to eat a dog biscuit for a dollar.... in the middle of a rotation... I love it.

Now they just need to let me INNNNNN dangit!
 

HopefulAg

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Speaking of gross things...we had a dog once that we had to go pick up for cremation. We got to the house and asked 'where's the dog?' expecting it to be in some deep freezer or something. "'Round back" was all the owner would tell us.

So we go 'round back and see no freezer, no shed, nothing. We do spy, however, a tin trashcan. Fearing the worst, we move to peek inside. The repugnant smell exuding from the trashcan confirms our fears way before our visual inspection did but we still had to make sure it was actually a dead dog (whether it was the dead dog was beside the point at this juncture).

There are some things you just can't unsee, and a dead dog who's been sitting in a tin trashcan in the Texas heat for three days in the dead of summer is one of those. "Dead dog" only applies because the 'dog soup' we saw was still technically dead, though it had stopped resembling a dog long ago.

It was utterly horrifying. Skin bits floating in a pool of brown/blackened blood/juices mixture, sprinkled with a healthy heaping of maggots. Ungh...still grosses me out and this happened several years ago.
 

StartingoverVet

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Speaking of gross things...we had a dog once that we had to go pick up for cremation. We got to the house and asked 'where's the dog?' expecting it to be in some deep freezer or something. "'Round back" was all the owner would tell us.

So we go 'round back and see no freezer, no shed, nothing. We do spy, however, a tin trashcan. Fearing the worst, we move to peek inside. The repugnant smell exuding from the trashcan confirms our fears way before our visual inspection did but we still had to make sure it was actually a dead dog (whether it was the dead dog was beside the point at this juncture).

There are some things you just can't unsee, and a dead dog who's been sitting in a tin trashcan in the Texas heat for three days in the dead of summer is one of those. "Dead dog" only applies because the 'dog soup' we saw was still technically dead, though it had stopped resembling a dog long ago.

It was utterly horrifying. Skin bits floating in a pool of brown/blackened blood/juices mixture, sprinkled with a healthy heaping of maggots. Ungh...still grosses me out and this happened several years ago.
Please include an alert in your message in the future such as "DO NOT READ RIGHT BEFORE LUNCH". My lunch in front of me is suddenly not so appetizing.
 

HandD42

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Please include an alert in your message in the future such as "DO NOT READ RIGHT BEFORE LUNCH". My lunch in front of me is suddenly not so appetizing.
Hahah to funny! I am reading Stiff by Mary Roach right now (someone on the forum recommended it) the book is about what happens to cadavers that have been donated to science. Anyway I can read it with any meal except breakfast. There is just something about dead bodies and my Wheaties that don't go together.
 

GoSpursGo

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that redhead

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Hahah to funny! I am reading Stiff by Mary Roach right now (someone on the forum recommended it) the book is about what happens to cadavers that have been donated to science. Anyway I can read it with any meal except breakfast. There is just something about dead bodies and my Wheaties that don't go together.
That book is still one of my most favorite of all time, and I read a ton of books.