Spiderman [RNA Ladder 2003]

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I was just thinking about something recently. I was just wondering if someone could help me out with this. When we loose baby teeth and grow adult ones, why we cannot grow new teeth when we loose them in the adulthood? I thought that it was something interesting to think about.
 

Fenrezz

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Thats a good question. Actually the pre-dents might know more than us.

Another question is: why can you get a haircut and the hair grows back forever, but if you shave your chest hair, the hair will grown as long as it was before, then stop? How does the chest hair know when it's long enough?
 
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Spiderman [RNA Ladder 2003]

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Originally posted by Fenrezz
Thats a good question. Actually the pre-dents might know more than us.

Another question is: why can you get a haircut and the hair grows back forever, but if you shave your chest hair, the hair will grown as long as it was before, then stop? How does the chest hair know when it's long enough?
I was not not thinking about chest hair on this one:laugh:
 

MedApp2003

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About the tooth thing, you don't really grow new ones, I don't think. You have the adult teeth already there above the baby teeth, then when the baby teeth come out, the adult ones move down. I was missing a couple adult teeth so when the baby teeth came out (which took a little longer since nothing was pushing down on them) there were just holes there. no adult teeth were grown.
 

rpames

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I don't the details, but I read an article last year or so that spoke of the teeth thing. Scientist have found the hormone that is involved in baby teeth replacement. They are also looking into animals like rodants (that continually grow a single tooth) and sharks to find out how they do it. Currently they are performing experiments to determine how to restimulate the release of the hormone, or how to inject the hormone so an adult will grow a new set of teeth. No more dentures!
:D
 

CaNEM

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The whole reason your baby teeth fall out in the first place is that the adult teeth are coming in and pushing them out. There is only one set down there, though, so of course there aren't any spares if you lose your adult teeth. We arent elephants or guinea pigs.

Originally posted by Fenrezz
Another question is: why can you get a haircut and the hair grows back forever, but if you shave your chest hair, the hair will grown as long as it was before, then stop? How does the chest hair know when it's long enough?
Does anyone know the answer to the hair question?
 

DrMom

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My great-grandfather actually got a 3rd set of teeth after he lost his adult teeth later in life. Don't have any explanation for that though...we're probably just freaks of nature!!:eek:

Don't know about the hair, but to muddy things up further: one of my parents' cats has hair that is different colors along the length of it. All of the hairs match (ie: 1/2 in from end they are all light brown) even though there are 4+ distinct color changes along them. I've always wondered what the deal was.:confused:
 
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Spiderman [RNA Ladder 2003]

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Well, after baby teeth fall out even though there are small adult teeth are there, they are small and they are growing. The question is that what stops the jaws frm growing new teeth? I have heard about that hormonal thing which sounds like as a reasonable explanation. How good would it be if we could just inject something in the gums or whatever and the actual teeth will grow back again. If it is possible, it should be a great research topic.
 

DALABROKA

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We studied odontogenesis in histology and I can give a brief run down on the process. The formation of the teeth is of an embryological origin and begins in the 6th and 7th week of gestation. Ectodermally derived oral epithelium proliferate to form a horseshoe shaped band of cells called the dental lamina. The dental lamina proliferates further to form 20 teeth buds that, after many more developmental steps, form the 20 deciduous (baby) teeth. The next developmental stage (cap stage) is were the origins of the succedaneous (permanent) teeth show up. This occures as an out growth of epithelium from the dental lamina deep into the surrouding tissue. It is this band of cells that gives rise to the adult teeth. Just like most other embryological developments, the future of your teeth is set well before you are born. After you lose an adult tooth there is not any further buds to grow in, so this is why there can be no new teeth. This is just like most other parts of the body in that once it is gone it can't be replaced. At least not yet....
 

galen

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Why are humans the only species to have menopause??? All other female animals just go on bearing young till they die..
.How does a lizard grow its tail back ???javascript:smilie(':confused:')
confused BTW How come all this javascript stuff comes up when I post a smilie face???
 
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Spiderman [RNA Ladder 2003]

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Originally posted by DALABROKA
We studied odontogenesis in histology and I can give a brief run down on the process. The formation of the teeth is of an embryological origin and begins in the 6th and 7th week of gestation. Ectodermally derived oral epithelium proliferate to form a horseshoe shaped band of cells called the dental lamina. The dental lamina proliferates further to form 20 teeth buds that, after many more developmental steps, form the 20 deciduous (baby) teeth. The next developmental stage (cap stage) is were the origins of the succedaneous (permanent) teeth show up. This occures as an out growth of epithelium from the dental lamina deep into the surrouding tissue. It is this band of cells that gives rise to the adult teeth. Just like most other embryological developments, the future of your teeth is set well before you are born. After you lose an adult tooth there is not any further buds to grow in, so this is why there can be no new teeth. This is just like most other parts of the body in that once it is gone it can't be replaced. At least not yet....
:clap: Thanks!!
 
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Spiderman [RNA Ladder 2003]

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How about primates in general? One of the main reasons, i think, that humans are not supposed to live as long as we live now. If we lived say 35-40 years, we would be the same as other animals in this regard.
 

CaNEM

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Originally posted by galen
Why are humans the only species to have menopause??? All other female animals just go on bearing young till they die..
What? This sounds silly, is there any truth to it? I know a few years back I was told my golden retriever didnt needed to be fixed, since she was 7 years old and too old to have kids anyway.
 
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