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UCLAstudent

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I'd post this in the "questions" thread, but I don't want to spoil it for anyone else who has taken it.

For problem 172, my answer key says that the answer is A (primary amines). I don't see how that is possible. Looking at the picture in the passage, I can see how benzylamine is a primary amine because the N is bound to a carbon that is only bound to one other carbon. For aniline, it is bound to a carbon bound to two other carbons. Wouldn't that make it secondary? I think maybe I am mixing up the rules for classifying alcohols with classifying amines.
 

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Originally posted by UCLAstudent


For problem 172, For aniline, it is bound to a carbon bound to two other carbons. Wouldn't that make it secondary?classifying amines.
It is the number of Carbons the N is attached to directly... not the number of Carbons the carbon N is attached to is attached to... wow that could probably be reworded but I'm sure you get what I'm saying... :p
 

UCLAstudent

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Thank you, you're wonderful! :D
 
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CanIMakeIt

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yep in amines it is little different..... it is the number of Cs directly bonded to N that counts.
 
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