ABC News: Doctor accused of fatal over-prescribing sues hospital for defamation.

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drusso

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"It would not be an exaggeration to state that Dr. Husel has suffered perhaps the most egregious case of defamation in Ohio's recent history," according to the lawsuit. Patients died from their illnesses, not the administration of fentanyl, a powerful painkiller ordered by Husel, he said in the lawsuit."

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"It would not be an exaggeration to state that Dr. Husel has suffered perhaps the most egregious case of defamation in Ohio's recent history," according to the lawsuit. Patients died from their illnesses, not the administration of fentanyl, a powerful painkiller ordered by Husel, he said in the lawsuit."

and yet he is only suing for 50k according to the article? that cant be true. why even bother
 
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He’s charged with murder? ****..I’m not familiar with the case was he in the wrong?
 
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He’s charged with murder? ****..I’m not familiar with the case was he in the wrong?
Looks like it was a palliative care thing where he is accused of giving too much meds to hasten death purposefully. He claims he followed the hospital's protocol. Tons of nurses got fired for carrying out his orders, but none were charged. I don't know much else about it.
 
Yikes -- mixed emotions on this one.

I do believe we need to revamp how we approach end-of-life care. Many states have already approved physician aid in death and I think this might be the approach we go on a nationwide level. The way people die in America is barbaric, cruel, and deprives patients of dignity and autonomy.

That being said, this physician needed to be familiar with state laws and hospital protocols. If he intentionally overdosed people to hasten death, then the patient or their medical surrogate needed to be consented and documented. It would be hard to justify 500+mcg fentanyl boluses as anything short of intentionally hastening death.
 
Yikes -- mixed emotions on this one.

I do believe we need to revamp how we approach end-of-life care. Many states have already approved physician aid in death and I think this might be the approach we go on a nationwide level. The way people die in America is barbaric, cruel, and deprives patients of dignity and autonomy.

That being said, this physician needed to be familiar with state laws and hospital protocols. If he intentionally overdosed people to hasten death, then the patient or their medical surrogate needed to be consented and documented. It would be hard to justify 500+mcg fentanyl boluses as anything short of intentionally hastening death.

it was illegal, yet the right thing to do. try to square that circle....
 
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it was illegal, yet the right thing to do. try to square that circle....

I'm not trying to justify his actions. It sounds like he had good intentions but knowingly broke the law and should be reprimanded. Charged with murder? I'm not sure given the sparse details of the article. If he knowingly overdosed patients without their or their next of kin's consent, then sure. If the patients and their families consented then I would think a lesser charge would be appropriate.
 
If you inject enough medication to kill them with the purpose of hastening death, that's murder. If they are in hospice (all parties agree that goals of treatment are patient's comfort and not to prolong living) and you are giving them opiate pain medication to treat pain or assist with work of breathing, then they happen to die, that is not murder. The intention behind the action is key.

Also, for what it's worth, in every physician assisted suicide state, usually the patient must be able to administer the fatal medication themselves.
 
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Honestly without knowing all the details including the individual patients pain tolerances there is no way to know what was going on here. This was over several years. And the last time I checked sick patients die pretty often. These patients could have had extreme tolerance to opioids from months or years of high doses. I’ve given patients 500mcg for induction in a cab and they kept right on breathing. Don’t judge without knowing the full story.
 
We need enhanced laws that permit assisted suicide, but not physician directed euthanasia.

Sorry if if am ever stricken with something terrible such as a " Locked-in syndrome" this is exactly what I would want
 
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Sorry if if am ever stricken with something terrible such as a " Locked-in syndrome" this is exactly what I would want

I plan on getting a giant Tupac-esque tattoo across my abdomen that says "PAIN MEDS ONLY. DNR/DNI" in the event that I ever have a stroke, TBI, locked-in, or other major neurological injury and can't communicate they yank the plug quick.
 
Sorry if if am ever stricken with something terrible such as a " Locked-in syndrome" this is exactly what I would want
I plan on getting a giant Tupac-esque tattoo across my abdomen that says "PAIN MEDS ONLY. DNR/DNI" in the event that I ever have a stroke, TBI, locked-in, or other major neurological injury and can't communicate they yank the plug quick.

You guys realize you can write your wishes down RIGHT NOW and get your wishes, correct? You don't need a giant Tupac tattoo or to leave it up to the night intern to kill you.
 
You guys realize you can write your wishes down RIGHT NOW and get your wishes, correct? You don't need a giant Tupac tattoo or to leave it up to the night intern to kill you.

What if they find me in a ditch and someone stabilizes me before locating my advanced directive? Not a risk I'm willing to take.
 
I plan on getting a giant Tupac-esque tattoo across my abdomen that says "PAIN MEDS ONLY. DNR/DNI" in the event that I ever have a stroke, TBI, locked-in, or other major neurological injury and can't communicate they yank the plug quick.
doh. you obviously haven't worked in ER.

the tattoo needs to be on your chest and DNI tattooed in tongue/posterior pharynx (backwards and upside down btw - because that would be the view while intubating...)
 
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and technically, medical tattoos are not valid and generally not followed.

you should have a written MOLST form documenting DNR request on file with your primary care provider.

you can purchase and wear a medical alert bracelet and have DNR specified in that bracelet as long as it is state approved. still need a MOLST form or some DNR form on file...
 
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