subzero0174

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Hey guys. I have a quick question. I am a junior at WVU and am pursuing a BS in Biology. I am also applying to med school next year. I am currently taking Anatomy Physiology, Organic Chem 2, Human Nutrition, and 3 other courses that have nothing to do with science. Although this may seem like a light course load, I am still putting in 4-6 hours a day. My friends like to give me a hard time about studying so much, but they are all business majors. On one occasion, a friend told me that if I have to study that much to get A's now, how do I think I am going to be able to make it in med school. I am just wondering if you guys think this is BS or if it really is a good indication of my future ability in med school. Basically what I am asking is that if I have to study non stop now, as an undergrad, does that mean that there is no way I can cut it in med school? I am applying to NYU, BU, WVU, Marshall U, Brown, Georgetown, and a couple others that I have not chosen yet. I have a 3.95GPA and lots of hands on OR volunteer experience. Thanks guys! :eek:
 

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You will make it by studying as much as you study now, all of the time. You'll be fine:)
 

shantster

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subzero0174 said:
Hey guys. I have a quick question. I am a junior at WVU and am pursuing a BS in Biology. I am also applying to med school next year. I am currently taking Anatomy Physiology, Organic Chem 2, Human Nutrition, and 3 other courses that have nothing to do with science. Although this may seem like a light course load, I am still putting in 4-6 hours a day.
That doesn't seem like a light courseload to me. I only have 5 classes and that's enough for me right now, only one of which is a true science (organic) depending on how you feel about psychology classes in relation to science, which I have two of this semester.
 

SocialistMD

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If anything, you will be better adjusted for medical school than those who do not have to study as much. I had never really studied before med school. I spent the entire first semester learning how to study and what study methods work best for me. My classmates who already knew how to study had much more success, both on the exams as well as knowing how to balance their time. I think learning to study appropriately it is one of the most difficult aspects in starting medical school, and you will already have that step out of the way.
 

Law2Doc

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subzero0174 said:
Hey guys. I have a quick question. I am a junior at WVU and am pursuing a BS in Biology. I am also applying to med school next year. I am currently taking Anatomy Physiology, Organic Chem 2, Human Nutrition, and 3 other courses that have nothing to do with science. Although this may seem like a light course load, I am still putting in 4-6 hours a day. My friends like to give me a hard time about studying so much, but they are all business majors. On one occasion, a friend told me that if I have to study that much to get A's now, how do I think I am going to be able to make it in med school. I am just wondering if you guys think this is BS or if it really is a good indication of my future ability in med school. Basically what I am asking is that if I have to study non stop now, as an undergrad, does that mean that there is no way I can cut it in med school? I am applying to NYU, BU, WVU, Marshall U, Brown, Georgetown, and a couple others that I have not chosen yet. I have a 3.95GPA and lots of hands on OR volunteer experience. Thanks guys! :eek:
I wouldn't worry -- lots of people who study hard and don't even get a 3.95 in college get into med school and do fine (the average matriculant's GPA is significantly lower than 3.95). You will just have to continue to work very hard, something you are now used to.
But I would certainly apply to more than the six plus a "couple" schools you indicated, unless in addition to the 3.95 and OR experience you have great MCATs.
 
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subzero0174

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I have not taken the MCATs as of yet. I feel that I will score somewhere in the 28 range(based on two practice MCATs and an expected improvement after Kaplan course). I would love to goto school somewhere in the NorthEast. Also would like to be in a fairly large city. Any suggestions on good medschools in that criteria?
 

Law2Doc

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subzero0174 said:
I have not taken the MCATs as of yet. I feel that I will score somewhere in the 28 range(based on two practice MCATs and an expected improvement after Kaplan course). I would love to goto school somewhere in the NorthEast. Also would like to be in a fairly large city. Any suggestions on good medschools in that criteria?
With a 28, you would want to apply to a fairly large number of schools, probably 20+. Check out USNews or Barrons and apply to a mix of the more and less competitive schools.
 

Sarcophageal

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I would start learning now that you shouldn't listen to your friends. Definitely do not listen to those who try to bring you down. Don't let them critique you. B/c when it comes to taking med school tests, boards, and Step 1,2,3, you will hear alot of people tell you things that could worry or scare you. People bragging about their high scores or talking bad about a high score. Take the opportunity now to be a self starter.