ABPM Board Certified? Any benefit?

Discussion in 'Podiatric Residents & Physicians' started by Ankle Breaker, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. SDN is made possible through member donations, sponsorships, and our volunteers. Learn about SDN's nonprofit mission.
  1. Ankle Breaker

    Ankle Breaker Senior Member 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,715
    Likes Received:
    389
    Location:
    Emerald City
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Verified
    Podiatrist
    With ABFAS boards on everyone's minds these days I looked at the ABPM board process and it appears that you can take the board qualifying exam in May 2017 and then take the board certification exam in October 2017. There is no mention of "collecting cases" for "x" amount of years before you can sit for the board certification exam in October 2017. Am I reading this correctly?

    Has anyone ever "benefited" from becoming board certified "sooner" through the ABPM pathway vs the standard ABFAS process? For example, getting hospital privileges quicker for more advanced procedures or getting granted certain privileges from their state department of health?

    Just curious to see how getting board certified quicker through the ABPM is of any advantage to a soon to be podiatry resident graduate.

    Thanks
     
    bobtheweazel likes this.
  2. SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads.
  3. air bud

    air bud 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2008
    Messages:
    1,214
    Likes Received:
    47
    Location:
    Land of the free
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    First, it lets you advertise yourself as "Board Certified." I know of some facilities that won't give you privileges unless you are board certified. And C, if they pay for it, do it. If not, don't spend the money.
     
  4. josebiwasabi

    josebiwasabi 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    49
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Verified
    Physician
    If you graduate from a 36 month residency program they waive the case collecting requirement.
     
  5. ExperiencedDPM

    ExperiencedDPM

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2015
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    124
    1) It is illegal to advertise you are board certified without clearly identifying the actual board.

    2). As most of you know, I've been around the block a few times. In my honest and "blunt" opinion, other than having to write another check to take an exam and write another check to pay dues, and have a nice new certificate to impress your patients and having a few more meaningless initials after your name, I personally see no value in the ABPM.

    3). I know my opinion is not politically correct. But it is my opinion. I've been involved with hiring many DPMs and one of the qualifications we looked for never involved the ABPM.

    4). Look at the classified ads and please let me know how many are seeking those who have ABPM certification.

    5). Just another certificate that you hang on your wall that will not increase your market value.

    6). As useful as a screen door on a submarine.

    Save your hard earned money. Use the money to buy your significant other a nice gift.
     
    Sweatshirt and dyk343 like this.
  6. dyk343

    dyk343 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2008
    Messages:
    1,095
    Likes Received:
    155
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    My understanding is that at least one attending within a residency program has to be ABPM certified to have the residency accredited. Other than that I have been highly advised to avoid the exam by 100% of my attendings and peers.
     
  7. dtrack22

    dtrack22 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,427
    Likes Received:
    201
    We have an attending outside of our hospital/program that we work with who has ABPM cert. He was able to get hospital privileges with the ABPM cert and partly due to laziness and partly due to the fact that he has privileges, hasn't submitted any cases for ABFAS. So ABPM had value to him, despite the fact that he refers to them as the "toenail boards." I just don't think for most people, in most instances it is of any benefit to anyone other than the Board (who's making $ off of you).

    I was speaking with another doc today who's hospital will only accept ABFAS cert (you can be "eligible" or "qualified") to grant privileges. From my limited understanding I would think this is the norm...rather than that first example. We probably benefited for a long time from folks not understanding Podiatry's alphabet soup (every specialty has em), but as ABFAS becomes more mainstream, more and more hospitals are going to stop taking a "medical board" as evidence that you should be granted surgical privileges. I think not getting ABFAS could seriously hamper future privileging prospects at many locations across the country.

    I think the "get board certified faster" is mostly a ABPM company line that gets repeated by everyone else. Though there still are situations where it may get you some privileges quicker. I think boards are interesting, and in most cases useless...you should read about some of the issues other docs are having. The American Board of Internal Medicine is a mess.
     
  8. NatCh

    NatCh Senior Moment 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Messages:
    1,119
    Likes Received:
    125
    Location:
    Oregon
    Status:
    Podiatrist
    My hospital requires qualification or certification only from ABFAS.
     
  9. diabeticfootdr

    diabeticfootdr 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    513
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Verified
    Podiatrist
    SDN
    Author
    For disclosure, I am on the Board of Directors of ABPM, but I am replying now in my personal capacity.

    The ABPM has gone through many changes in the past 5-8 years. The Board of Directors has strived to make this board useful and user-friendly to the profession. Recently, ABPM has almost 500 new test takers every year. This is a significant portion of the graduating residency pool. Many DPMs have difficulty acquiring the case volume and diversity needed for ABFAS within the 7 year period. ABPM certification can be useful to avoid being removed from the hospital staff or insurance panel while you are attaining those case requirements, or after 7 years, more and more DPMs are finding they don't need ABFAS (myself included). You can find the exam content for ABPM here: https://www.abpmed.org/files/General Examination Information.pdf

    The ABPM is recognized by the profession's credentialing bodies and the US Government:

    The ABPM and the ABFAS are the only two certifying boards for doctors of podiatric medicine (DPMs) approved by the Joint Committee on the Recognition of Specialty Boards (JCRSB) of the Council on Podiatric Medical Education (CPME), which is the credentialing body utilized by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA).

    Regarding medical staff applications and surgical privileges:

    There are two components to the initial medical staff application for hospitals, credentialing and privileging. Hospital credentialing is based on a DPM’s verification that they have completed podiatric medical school, post-graduate residency, are licensed to practice, and are board certified. Board certification is a voluntary step that many DPMs seek after completion of residency and it assists hospitals and the public in verifying that the DPM has attained more than the minimal competencies in order to practice. Board certification is required by most hospitals and other institutions in order to be credentialed.

    Specifically for surgeons, privileging for procedures is based on one’s education, training, and experience. The education (podiatric medical school) and training (residency) in podiatric medicine and surgery are standardized by the CPME with residents all getting similar medical and surgical experiences in a 3 year post-graduate residency. Experience is documented by case logs from residency and thereafter. If a DPM can not provide sufficient evidence of experience, hospitals frequently require proctoring to demonstrate competence.

    That being said, there are still hospitals which stipulate ABFAS certification is necessary for surgical privileges. In these cases, the ABPM board office intervenes when diplomates report this discrimination and will help the hospital draft inclusive bylaws based on the above.

    If you have any confidential questions you don't want to post here, The Board of Directors is very approachable, you can email any of us (or the Board Staff) via this page: https://www.abpmed.org/pages/about-abpm
     
    AttackNME, crouton, hematosis and 2 others like this.
  10. crouton

    crouton 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Podiatry Student

    Is it actually discrimination when a hospital requires ABFAS certification and not just ABPM? Not disagreeing I guess I've just never thought about it. I am ABPM certified but now it will be hard to be ABFAS certified due to diversity and it has been stressing me out. And have you ever seen a hospital reverse its decision to require board certification in surgery and allow just ABPM. I feel like so many hospitals require ABFAS now
     
  11. Ankle Breaker

    Ankle Breaker Senior Member 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,715
    Likes Received:
    389
    Location:
    Emerald City
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Verified
    Podiatrist
    After I took the ABFAS board qualifying exams this past week I considered signing up for the ABPM exams but I quickly learned that podiatry in my future state of practice does not recognize that board for surgical privileges within the state. I even discussed this with some prominent DPMs in my future state of practice to ensure that this was correct and they told me it was. They told me that board is completely worthless to me in my future state of practice. So I am unsure how the ABPM can go into my future state of practice and tell the department of health that they need to recognize their board and change the laws. Especially when my future state of practice is one of the more stricter states in terms of regulations on podiatrists in terms of surgical privileges. I just don't see how they could pull it off in that political climate.

    Another thing that gets my goat is that when I was looking at the ABPM website you can't just sign up for the board qualifying exam by itself. Because if you do you can't become board-certified in the same year which I think is ridiculous.


    Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2017
  12. hello8

    hello8 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2007
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pre-Podiatry
    Is there a way to quickly find out which hospitals/states accept ABPM as well as ABFAS? Is it typically a statewide rule or a hospital by hospital decision?
     
  13. dtrack22

    dtrack22 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,427
    Likes Received:
    201
    I will become an orthofix sales rep or die before I give money to more certifying boards than I have to...
     
    NatCh and bobtheweazel like this.
  14. Ankle Breaker

    Ankle Breaker Senior Member 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,715
    Likes Received:
    389
    Location:
    Emerald City
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Verified
    Podiatrist
    I think it can be either. For me personally in the future state where I will be practicing they have specific by laws by the department of health of that state that basically say podiatrists can only do surgery if they have the ABFAS credential(board qualified/ board certified).




    Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
     
  15. RockyIV

    RockyIV 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    There is no point in being double board certified in podiatry. So ABPM really only exists for those who do not or cannot pass the ABFAS foot exam.
     
    ExperiencedDPM likes this.
  16. ExperiencedDPM

    ExperiencedDPM

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2015
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    124
    Agreed 100%.
     
  17. ExperiencedDPM

    ExperiencedDPM

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2015
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    124
    May not be a bad idea. One of "my" orthopedic hardware reps recently took me out to dinner to discuss me possibly lecturing for his company. He pulled up in a brand new, high end Mercedes and just bought a beautiful new home. And he's got no loans to pay back.
     
    Weirdy likes this.

About the ads

Share This Page