Disciple

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Oct 18, 2004
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I've been doing end of the year membership renewals and realized that I owe the ABPMR $125 every year just to keep my board certification valid.

:mad:

Did anyone else know about this?
 

Xardas

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May 29, 2007
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I've been doing end of the year membership renewals and realized that I owe the ABPMR $125 every year just to keep my board certification valid.

:mad:

Did anyone else know about this?
Yes.. they're somewhat lenient about this I think. I paid mine a month late or so. Don't expect this to get this better. Professional society fees are worse, though. Everything seems to increase much greater than inflation as well.
 

lobelsteve

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The fees are needed to ensure that the old farts who grandfathered themselves out of MOC can keep taking our money.

What has the AAPMR/ABPMR done for you?
 
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Spine Specialist

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I am not sure why I think about this famous quote from the greatest president of all times.

And so, my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you: ask what you can do for your country.
John F. Kennedy
 

ShrikeMD

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Sep 14, 2007
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I've been doing end of the year membership renewals and realized that I owe the ABPMR $125 every year just to keep my board certification valid.

:mad:

Did anyone else know about this?
Yes. I heard about it. It is a scam. They do it because they can. This touches a raw nerve for me.

Fortunately, I don't have to participate in this particular scam (at least for now) because I was certified in the last of the time-unlimited certifications. They charge YOU because they have YOU over a barrel. Perhaps they think that if you pay for your certification exam in fractions over the 10 years, then you are more likely to take the exam versus charging someone a bigger chunk of change for an exam they may not want (or need) to take.

I think that most members of the ABPMR really believe that they have the specialty's best interests at heart when they make proposals regarding MOC. Unfortunately, I think they are just plain out of touch with the reality of the clinician, and more in touch with what other peers (not us clinical physiatrists, but the ABPMR peers on other ABMS boards) are doing to address MOC issues in THEIR specialties. The discussion isn't about how this makes US better doctors, or how this creates better care for OUR patients, it is about creating the PERCEPTION that we are better doctors, or that we are PERCEIVED as providing better care for our patients.

Look, I think it is reasonable to go through the board certification process ONCE, when we are completing our residency training. I remain unconvinced of the value of the recertification process in PMR as it is presently implemented, and await a better justification for the process than "OTHER specialties have to do it more frequently", or "if we don't do it, we will be forced to do it by someone else".

Yes, we live with many rules/regs whose creation was rooted with good intentions, but the implementation causes only more work/hassle/documentation/cost from us without/with little compelling evidence it does anyone (but the regulators, that is) any good.

(Example 1: medical records documentation. Initially it was a record of the care patients received, to facilitate continuity of care and documentation of issues that arose in that care. Now, it has morphed into an ugly behemoth whose PRIMARY purpose is providing documentation for support of billing for services and procedures rendered.)

(Example 2: credentials verification is becoming a royal pain in the ***** AND the wallet. How often do we have to reaffirm that we have a license, that we have been board certified, that we haven't committed a felony, or that someone has/hasn't sued us [as though THAT meant we were good/bad doctors, or heaven forbid we were sued, that we FOREVER recount the details of that miserable experience EVEN if the case was DISMISSED!]. At our rehab hospital, we have consultants who are reconsidering whether they want to see patients at our institution for the hassle/cost of going through our annual credentials verification.

I recently began the process of applying for privileges at a rehab hospital that I was thinking of joining, and they wanted evidence to support my application for intrathecal baclofen pump management privileges! I wondered whether I should 1) ask them what criteria they use to judge whether someone is qualified to manage a pump; 2) mention that I attended one of the Med____ic "Advanced" ITB Courses (read: advanced marketing dog & pony show so you can more creatively justify putting more pumps in people); 3) mention that I lecture and write on this topic; 4) ask whether successfully completing residency training at a "top 5" PMR training program with subsequent board certification qualifies anyone to practice their specialty anymore? )

Look, I am not against REASONABLE rules, board certification, or credentials verification. But (when) is someone going to stand up and say "ENOUGH ALREADY!"
 

Disciple

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Oct 18, 2004
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I had come to terms with the idea of "MOC" assuming that I would be charged an examination fee when registering for the re-cert examination.

Come to find out that now I have to pay annual fees to keep my board certification valid.

and, we have to meet CME requirements (separate from state licensure requirements) and complete some "practice-improvement" project.

Throw on top of that the notion that PM&R is unique in that it is a specialty that requires multiple board certifications, all of which will require re-cert, and this whole thing is starting to look like it's more trouble than it's worth.:bang:
 

Xardas

10+ Year Member
May 29, 2007
174
17
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Attending Physician
I had come to terms with the idea of "MOC" assuming that I would be charged an examination fee when registering for the re-cert examination.

Come to find out that now I have to pay annual fees to keep my board certification valid.

and, we have to meet CME requirements (separate from state licensure requirements) and complete some "practice-improvement" project.

Throw on top of that the notion that PM&R is unique in that it is a specialty that requires multiple board certifications, all of which will require re-cert, and this whole thing is starting to look like it's more trouble than it's worth.:bang:
Here is what I want to see.. I want to start seeing transparency with what those fees goes towards.. Just like other industries are being forced to disclose what they are doing, I'd like to know what percentage of my dollar goes to what activities.

Anyone care to help start a movement?
 

Disciple

Senior Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 18, 2004
2,558
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Here is what I want to see.. I want to start seeing transparency with what those fees goes towards.. Just like other industries are being forced to disclose what they are doing, I'd like to know what percentage of my dollar goes to what activities.

Anyone care to help start a movement?

I'd bet a substantial proportion goes to cover the lost income of whomever is taking the time to grade our Practice Improvement Projects:laugh:


Count me in on the call for disclosure.

What do we need to do, write a petition or something?
 

Ludicolo

Fib Hunter
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Mar 26, 2008
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I think that most members of the ABPMR really believe that they have the specialty's best interests at heart when they make proposals regarding MOC. Unfortunately, I think they are just plain out of touch with the reality of the clinician, and more in touch with what other peers (not us clinical physiatrists, but the ABPMR peers on other ABMS boards) are doing to address MOC issues in THEIR specialties. The discussion isn't about how this makes US better doctors, or how this creates better care for OUR patients, it is about creating the PERCEPTION that we are better doctors, or that we are PERCEIVED as providing better care for our patients.
Nail on the head.

MOC, while at its core is a good idea, has (d)evolved into expensive hoop jumping. I liken it to the Joint Commission. This is for public appearance only, and doesn’t really have any direct impact on patient care. It’s not just the annual fees (which as an aside are always are due at the end of the year, along with academy dues, association dues, license renewals, holiday gifts… makes for a very expensive time of the year. But I digress). The PIP is annoying, but more ominous is the last sentence in the MOC booklet under Practice Performance: “Additional practice performance tools are in development”. More pain to come.
 

Xardas

10+ Year Member
May 29, 2007
174
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I'd bet a substantial proportion goes to cover the lost income of whomever is taking the time to grade our Practice Improvement Projects:laugh:


Count me in on the call for disclosure.

What do we need to do, write a petition or something?
Probably do need to start a petition. There are places to do e-petitions, I will try and look into this.
 

lobelsteve

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Just got an email from the ABPMR stating they are raising the MOC fee by $50 because its getting complicated and they need more people.
this is getting ridiculous!!
Probably the number of peple they are allowing to drop primary cert and just keep secondary cert is hurting their pockets.

RNs are getting paid to do our jobs and we are being teed up to be administrative drones.
 

Gauss

Damnit Jim!
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Mar 3, 2002
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dropping primary cert isn't even feasible for most of us - it's mandated in your employment and insurance contracts to have PM&R cert. Most hospitals require it for privileges as well. Then if you drop it and have to pick it up again in the future have fun with re-boarding.
 

Louisville04

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Oct 8, 2005
319
4
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Attending Physician
"We know that even small fee increases have an impact on you. That’s why we’re announcing this change now — so you have a chance to pay the lower rate for this year’s fee."

See they really care ;)
 

clubdeac

10+ Year Member
Aug 16, 2007
3,809
963
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Attending Physician
Has there been any more talk about this ****? I know last year the IM docs boycotted and got their annual fees dropped as well as the requirement for their practice performance project. I thought we were working on doing the same in PMR? We need to stop this soon. Seriously
 
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