Academic Inbreeding: BA and PhD at the same university?

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I have heard a number of negative things about going to the same university for one's BA and PhD degrees. This year I received a fully funded offer to the clinical psychology PhD program from my undergrad institution (with my undergrad advisor).

I wanted to get some outside opinions: Would you take a year off and re-apply or stay at the same university? Is the academic inbreeding stigma enough that it is worth applying again?

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I have heard a number of negative things about going to the same university for one's BA and PhD degrees. This year I received a fully funded offer to the clinical psychology PhD program from my undergrad institution (with my undergrad advisor).

I wanted to get some outside opinions: Would you take a year off and re-apply or stay at the same university? Is the academic inbreeding stigma enough that it is worth applying again?

I am not sure, however, if this is the only offer you have, I would take it. This application process is enough of a game, there's no guarantee for next time. There are a few people in my program who also went to undergrad here, and it doesn't seem to be a problem. However, since they are still students, I don't know if the "academic inbreeding" effect has hurt them on the job hunt. I highly doubt it would matter with a clinical career path, but maybe more so with a research focused one?
 
I never really understand the problem with it. If the program is an APA accredited program they are not just letting anyone who wants to come join. Even undergrads still need to meet and/or exceed the competitiveness of the applicant pool at the time. For this discipline I highly doubt anyone is going to doubt your abilities because of inbreeding. Esp. if your research interests fit with someone really well in the department. Why go somewhere where the research match would be anything the less than the best??

One thing I would suggest which you are probably going to do anyways it makes sure your CV reflects a diverse range of experiences (e.g. practicums).
 
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I think you can overcome it. I did my undergrad, master's and Ph.D. at the same university. I matched at my top choice APA-approved internship, and have landed interviews at the top post-doc sites for my specialization area. However, I did choose to go away for internship to gain new experiences in a different setting (and an internship diploma from a different university), and network with new people.
 
I know a small handful of people who completed their undergrad and grad work at the university I attend(ed). None of them has yet had trouble matching for internship or finding work, although I'm not sure if any of them are planning on going the academic route, where the stigma might be the greatest. Also, a couple went elsewhere to complete a master's before ultimately returning for the doctoral program.

I say if you have an offer and the fit is better than at your other offer locations, go for it. Likewise, if it's your only standing offer, definitely take it rather than risk re-applying elsewhere next year.
 
I have heard a number of negative things about going to the same university for one's BA and PhD degrees. This year I received a fully funded offer to the clinical psychology PhD program from my undergrad institution (with my undergrad advisor).

I wanted to get some outside opinions: Would you take a year off and re-apply or stay at the same university? Is the academic inbreeding stigma enough that it is worth applying again?

I think this "stigma" largely manifests in Graduate programs having bias against undergrads from the same school. It seems that you have overcome the stigma. If you feel that the program will meet your training needs and is good (e.g. has APA accreditation, reasonable cohort, relatively good match and graduation within 7 years rates, good funding,), then take the offer and get on with your life. This will be one less move that you'll have to do, less new faces and places to get used to, and you'll have the advantage of being able to maintain any social/recreational contacts you have, while still being able to meet new people through the program. Knowing that you can successful co-exist and progress with your mentor is also huge.

I'll echo what others have said- I have never encountered or been aware of any bias towards students who went to the same grad and undergrad schools (unless, of course, the whole school was lame). I did so, and didn't encounter any problems with internships, jobs, etc. as a result.
 
I am shocked I completely missed this thread! I am in the same position as the OP, my undergraduate institution offered me a great funding opportunity with a different department (UG in Psy, MA+PhD in HDFS). And I heard the same thing too, that it would be really bad, but it's also the only place that offered me funding and I am not going to bulk up on loans just yet. I contacted my psych mentor and he mentioned to me that sure, it's good to diversify your schools but it's not the end of the world if you stay to do your PhD in the same place you did your undergrad.
 
I can't believe I missed this either!

This was my first year applying to clinical PhD programs and, out of 10 schools, I got three interviews, one being from the university I completed my undergrad degree at. I ended up only getting an offer at my undergrad university. It's an all around perfect fit (fully funded, great research/clinical opportunities, working with a great faculty member) but I was worried that this stigma would effect me down the line.

I asked around if this would be a problem and the general sentiment is that of the posters on this thread. That is, it doesn't really matter because the process is so fickle that you should take the opportunity if it arises. While I'm a little bummed I don't get to move to a new environment, I'm thankful that I get the chance to pursue my preferred career!
 
P.S. I can't believe I'm reading/posting on SDN on St. Patty's Day. I should be doing something normal like drinking :laugh:
 
I feel as though it wouldn't be viewed negatively, although I'm surprised to see how many people on here were accepted into their undergrads!

I had no desire whatsoever to stay at my undergrad for my PhD. I feel like all of the faculty in the psych department are mean, unhappy and unsupportive. Plus, 4 years was enough for me! Time for a change of scenery. :D
 
You are very fortunate to have been accepted at the same university you completed your BS degree. Most of us can only dream of this ever happening. I stayed at my undergraduate institution for my first MS degree in counseling. I still consider this my alma mater despite getting other graduate degrees. Count your blessings and get your doctorate as normally it is nearly impossible to stay at your undergraduate institution.
 
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