Isentropic

5+ Year Member
Nov 30, 2012
41
9
Status
Medical Student
Hello All,

As the May Summer semester approaches, I'm getting nervous. I was accepted to Bryn Mawr's Post-Bacc program 2013-2014, but increasingly thinking about the debt and long path ahead I'll be involved in.

Also, I have a very good job in my current field, making over $92K+ (bonuses included) at a young, relative age (mid-twenties). The hours are pretty standard also, ~40 hrs./wk, and living in a low-cost-of-living area. I'm also almost done paying off my previous student loans.

Although I'm shadowing and volunteering to keep up my motivations, I'm just continually thinking about what I'll be giving up, and what I'll really be gaining in the long run. Have many of you had similar thoughts, uncertainty, and decisions to make?

I'd really appreciate the thoughts and other input. Thanks!!
 
Jul 21, 2012
194
30
Status
Medical Student
Just do it. I was on 130k per year when I applied to Goucher and haven't looked back for one moment. The money just doesn't matter when you're going into a field where any opportunity cost is easily earned back with interest. And in terms of loans, I'd only just started that job and so only paid enough student debt down to be at the $100k debt mark before I started Goucher. Having started out with no money and no safety net in this country, I can confidently say that money doesn't really matter as long as you have enough to get by - which you will as a med student and doc.

On the other hand, plenty of people decide medicine isn't worth the 10-or-so years of lost quality of life - long hours, low pay, risk of not getting into med school (which at Bryn Mawr is close to zero), etc. Sounds like you're in for crunch time about whether medicine is for you. What's most important in your life right now? Comfort or purpose?
 
Oct 17, 2012
7
0
Status
Pre-Medical
If it is really in your heart to be a doctor, go for it. My tipping point is knowing that no matter how much money I make in my current field, I will likely never wake up excited about work. Medicine will be a much more rewarding career path for me. It comes down to a single question -- "What do you see yourself doing for the next 30 years?". From what you've shared, it's a given that you will make a comfortable living -- regardless of your profession. SO, choose what "feels" right.
 

GorgeousBorges

7+ Year Member
Feb 6, 2012
164
14
OH
Status
Medical Student
Edited: This post said what everybody said in a more pretentious way.
 
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OP
I

Isentropic

5+ Year Member
Nov 30, 2012
41
9
Status
Medical Student
Thanks a lot for your comments and advice guys. It really helps knowing others have faced similar situations before.

I was just thinking about the cost and time involved, although I'm very interested in pursuing this.

Thanks much again for the valuable input.
 
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betterlate

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Oct 14, 2008
133
0
Status
Medical Student
Grain of salt - everyone who responded to this has already made the decision to go back to school. Clearly we have a bias as we respond!

I'd advise you to think long and hard about whether or not you want to do medicine at all. This is a long, stressful road. Those of us who decided to embark upon it find it inherently worthwhile, but your mileage may vary. If you decide that you do, in fact, want to go into medicine, then a one-year postbacc is an efficient (albeit expensive) way to go. If you decide to embark on this road, your choice then becomes whether or not to start the process this year. You may want to contact BM and see if you can defer by one year. Use that year to pay off debt or amass some savings in the bank and/or to consider whether or not you want to go into medicine at all.

good luck!
 

darkjedi

how did this get here I am not good with computer
7+ Year Member
Oct 14, 2009
2,986
2,938
I was in a similar boat as you, coming from the lucrative finance industry to plunge deep into potentially hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt. However, there was a certain point where I had very adamantly decided that in the end, the salary was not worth it to stay in an industry I ultimately was not super passionate about.

It is ultimately a choice you have to make for yourself. You should definitely think heavily on this matter. As another poster pointed out, you can defer the summer semester or even the year if you want to take that extra time to see if it's worth it to you. It is far too long and difficult a road to travel down if you are not completely sure about it.

I do not regret my choice one bit and am definitely in a much better place in life now than I was 3 years ago when I started down this path.
 
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Isentropic

5+ Year Member
Nov 30, 2012
41
9
Status
Medical Student
darkjedi,
Thanks for the input. It's helpful to know others who were in a similar boat also, providing much-needed perspective. Did you have previous student loans before starting post bacc, or other savings? We can discuss via PM if you prefer instead.

From your experience, which programs have early linkage dates, since various programs apparently seem to different dates.

Thanks much again for your input.
 
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Isentropic

5+ Year Member
Nov 30, 2012
41
9
Status
Medical Student
Hello,
That's actually a good idea; I may try to discuss about taking an educational leave, and leave the door to possibly rejoining in future.

Really hope this works out.

Thanks much!
 

darkjedi

how did this get here I am not good with computer
7+ Year Member
Oct 14, 2009
2,986
2,938
darkjedi,
Thanks for the input. It's helpful to know others who were in a similar boat also, providing much-needed perspective. Did you have previous student loans before starting post bacc, or other savings? We can discuss via PM if you prefer instead.

From your experience, which programs have early linkage dates, since various programs apparently seem to different dates.

Thanks much again for your input.
I did not have student loans left over from college, with whatever amount I did have paid off not so long after graduating. That said, I only had a meager amount of savings before post-bac, which ate up most of that.

Definitely feel free to PM me with any of your questions, I would be more than happy to help out!

Bryn Mawr, Goucher, JHU, Columbia and UPenn all have linkages. Different postbacs have different linkages set up, with drastically different success rates between them. I'm not entirely sure what you mean by "early linkage dates" however. Usually how a linkage works is that you take your pre-req classes, and in the semester you are finishing your postbac (usually the spring), you apply for your desired linkage, and if you are accepted, you can matriculate into the next class (that fall).

You should definitely consider Member's suggestion if your company allows it. Should you decide to pursue a full-time postbac, it will leave very little time to hold down another job, even a part-time one.