udrag14

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Nov 20, 2008
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ACRO Resident Webinar September 7, 2016| Learning How to Get What You Need to Succeed: Negotiating an Academic Job

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Title: Learning How to Get What You Need to Succeed: Negotiating an Academic Job

Description: Dr. Reshma Jagsi, Professor and Deputy Chair in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Michigan Health System, will be discussing tips on negotiating an academic job. This webinar will cover the important aspects of academic negotiations including salary and research resources. Please email questions to [email protected]. We will take limited questions on the day of the panel. This webinar is aimed at ACRO members, which is free for all residents.

Date & Time: Wednesday, September 7, 2016 at 5:00PM EDT

This webinar is complimentary to all members, and membership is free for residents. You can join by clicking the link below, then register for the webinar in the members only section.

Benefits of membership include: webinars, mentorship, online access to the Journal of Radiation Oncology, guidance in professional development and the job search, discounted textbooks and online courses, and several scholarships as they become available. Visit our website for more information.

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udrag14

10+ Year Member
Nov 20, 2008
52
10
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Attending Physician
Friendly reminder that this webinar will happen tomorrow at 5 PM. For those who cannot make it live, we will post on the ACRO webinar website.

For questions, please send an email to [email protected]. We will take select questions on the day of the webinar.
 

OTN

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Nov 6, 2003
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Negotiating an academic job? What's there to negotiate?

I graduated this past summer as an MD/PhD. My home program offered me a fellowship despite excellent clinical evaluations and 7 first author publications with them. I repeatedly contacted dozens of academic programs around the country. I interviewed at a grand total of two programs. Both programs made non-negotiable offers that were to be signed the day before they offered them to me, and if I wasn't willing to sign yesterday they would go to the next of 5 people they had waiting in line for the position.

I feel lucky to be in academics at all after the constant rejections. It stings a bit being offered interviews that were later rescinded (twice) or being told "we're not hiring this year" only to have them hire 1-2 people.

But in my case, everything I asked for was immediately shot down--research time or resources, site preferences, etc. I didn't even get a contract from one place. It just said "here's your salary (to be adjusted at any time at our whim), here's your 2 year non-compete, refer to the faculty manual for more details." Winning?
You need to log on to the webinar and hit them HARD with these details. Radonc academia has absolutely failed our young scientists.
 

thecarbonionangle

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Aug 23, 2014
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LOL "negotiating a contract"....these academic positions are extremely competitive and often quite a race to the bottom. Someone else will eat your lunch if you fall asleep. They will find someone more desperate than you willing to work for less and do more. There's always someone willing to bend the knee. Don't sleep.
 

oldking

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I talked with a friend in a hot, quantitative area of biomedical research at a top place. He was gung-ho on being a professor/PI until he realized that his research advisors were driven by the same desire for wealth and influence as people in the industry/startup world. And the people in industry did better work and published in better journals.

It's so strange that so many residents in rad onc want to do academics, when only a very few academic attendings end up doing innovative work.
I'm not sure if residents and medical students actually want to do research so much as they have to do so (and pretend to love it) so they can get a residency spot, etc
 

SJSM001

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Feb 5, 2013
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Negotiating an academic job? What's there to negotiate?

I graduated this past summer as an MD/PhD. My home program offered me a fellowship despite excellent clinical evaluations and 7 first author publications with them. I repeatedly contacted dozens of academic programs around the country. I interviewed at a grand total of two programs. Both programs made non-negotiable offers that were to be signed the day before they offered them to me, and if I wasn't willing to sign yesterday they would go to the next of 5 people they had waiting in line for the position.

I feel lucky to be in academics at all after the constant rejections. It stings a bit being offered interviews that were later rescinded (twice) or being told "we're not hiring this year" only to have them hire 1-2 people.

But in my case, everything I asked for was immediately shot down--research time or resources, site preferences, etc. I didn't even get a contract from one place. It just said "here's your salary (to be adjusted at any time at our whim), here's your 2 year non-compete, refer to the faculty manual for more details." Winning?
Just curious if others looking for academic jobs in the last few years have had similar experiences? Anyone else have input?
 

medgator

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Sep 20, 2004
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Just curious if others looking for academic jobs in the last few years have had similar experiences? Anyone else have input?
Wouldn't be surprising to see parallel trends in both academics and pp of a tightening job market.