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chemu

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Hi Everyone!

Incoming 2012 med student here! Although not a lifelong athlete, during my current year off I seriously took up running, and ran my first marathon last December (4.38)! Very thrilling! I love running now and fitness, and I am excited about making this a lifelong habit. I recently started on biking and swimming, and hope to do a triathlon of some length this year, and continue doing marathons/tri's at least once a year.

I'm excited about starting med school in the fall, and I'm curious if there are marathoners/tri-athletes out there able to do their studies well but also find time to get out and put in the training miles, or bike rides? What are your experiences? Have you been able to mix school and race training successfully? I know third year is hell, but otherwise is this a passion you or others have been able to keep up?

I think it will be a great way for me to relieve stress, and have something outside of class that motivates me. I'm not a big T.V person, and I can see training being my main out-of-class activity. It's also great way to stay in shape and look great!

I'll be going to school in SF almost likely, which has a great outdoors culture, good weather, and numerous marathon/triathlon clubs with organized group workouts to make life easier.

Any experiences/input from ya'all already in med school? Thank You!
 

-Goose-

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Along with several others in my class, I run marathons. It is definitely possible, especially during the pre-clinical years. It will take discipline and dedication, but it is definitely possible.

Triathlons, as you know, take more time to train. I am planning on doing my first olympic distance tri in several years this fall (in the midst of my peds rotation). We'll see how that goes.
 

Luxian

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I'm also incoming 2012, so I can't speak to the workload. But my biggest concern is the cost! I do triathlons and the signup fees regularly range from $50-100. I don't think I can swing doing one a month like last summer. Maybe I can put a jar up on my desk and ask for donations? Hmph!
 
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soeagerun2or

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I do marathons and ironman length triathlons (know several other med students who do as well). It takes a lot of motivation and planning but can be done.
 

sprinkibrio

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A TON of us do marathons, half-marathons, and triathlons at my school. We're all crazy control freaks here in med school so it comes with the territory. You should put together a run/walk for charity or get your class to participate... super fun. Good luck!
 

FNU LNU

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This is totally doable. My class is actually using a local marathon to raise money for pediatric cancer. Besides, you need to take time to blow off steam in med school (tris are great for this--nothing says relaxation like thrashing about in ice cold, choppy water with a couple hundred other crazies). Good luck!
 

IronMed10

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Definitely possible, you just have to budget your time. Find creative ways to get your workouts in (bike to school, take the stairs, etc). Roger Bannister broke the 4' mile as a medical student, so it shouldn't be a problem if you're really into it. Useful links:

http://www3.georgetown.edu/som/student/ironmed2007/ironmed.html

http://www.alexmmtri.com/

http://ironmed.sweat365.com/

Also, both IM Wisconsin and USAT Collegiate Nationals have divisions for collegiate and/or graduate students. Hope that helps.
 

chemu

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This is awesome news, very encouraging! Thank you all for your responses and input.

Luxian, about cost, I figure if one cuts back on other expenses, like eat out less etc and put the luxury money instead to your races, you can make it. Also, I find that most school's the student budget is a slight bit higher than necessary if you are able to get cheaper rent etc, that's a way to save $100/$200 a month.

I haven't seen any marathon/tri club at my soon to be school yet, I can always start one! Also, organizing a local race with classmates would be awesome.

goodluck goose on your tri
 

chemu

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Definitely possible, you just have to budget your time. Find creative ways to get your workouts in (bike to school, take the stairs, etc). Roger Bannister broke the 4' mile as a medical student, so it shouldn't be a problem if you're really into it. Useful links:

http://www3.georgetown.edu/som/student/ironmed2007/ironmed.html

http://www.alexmmtri.com/

http://ironmed.sweat365.com/

Also, both IM Wisconsin and USAT Collegiate Nationals have divisions for collegiate and/or graduate students. Hope that helps.

I'm assuming the third link is your website. Congrats, very impressive PR's! Quite inspiring
 

HEADintheCLOUDS

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:laugh:I do them all the time. Did the ironman in KOna and finished 43rd. Not the best but I beat a s-load of people. It is hard to train though. But about the fees my school paid my way, flying included but I had to wear the school colors. I guess they thought it was good advertising!:laugh: (but I am guessing my school paid for me only because I was good. My friend was not and got no money and thus did not go!:laugh:
 

velo

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Hey, that's awesome OP, you should definitely keep up with your athletic pursuits in med school. I raced road bikes all through undergrad but unfortunately wasn't able to put in the amount of training in med school to race on the road at a level I was happy with. Luckily I discovered triathlons and found that it was very possible to fit that training into my schedule--even in my clinical years. I also know several classmates who trained for marathons during med school.

So I say yeah, go for it. Its totally possible and it really helps to keep you sane!
 

humuhumu

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I'm running a half marathon this Saturday. I ran one last year, too. It's doable....at least during the preclinical years.
 
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iceman77_7

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Holy smokes! Congrats!

I may have to find you when I start in Cleveland this summer! I'm doing sprint tris now and I want to work up to Olympic distance. I don't think IM is in my dreams, but possible HIM someday! Good luck on your races!

There's a solid bunch of runners/triathletes in the first year class right now. A group of us are actually running the Hermes 10-miler tomorrow (which I must go to bed soon for), another group running the Cincy full marathon next month and a few others and myself doing the Cleveland half. Couple people have done full ironmans as well as ultramarathons. It's definitely doable at Case during the first two years cuz you have your afternoons off!
 

chemu

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thank you all for your responses.

for those dropping by thread, I'd like to hear your tips on how you were able to schedule your training amidst classes/other activities? What kinds of sacrifices have you had to make to be able to train for your races and still study enough? EC's, nights out with friends, aspiring for ultra-competitive residency etc? Have you been able to put in at least 5 days of workouts consistently during med school, even third year? How do you handle the unpredictable rotation schedules ? early a.m. workouts?

I know when I trained for my marathon, the 20 mile Saturdays would all be consumed by preparation/running/recovery. I wonder if I'll have that luxury in med school

any practical advice and experiences are welcomed

thanks
 

velo

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thank you all for your responses.

for those dropping by thread, I'd like to hear your tips on how you were able to schedule your training amidst classes/other activities? What kinds of sacrifices have you had to make to be able to train for your races and still study enough? EC's, nights out with friends, aspiring for ultra-competitive residency etc? Have you been able to put in at least 5 days of workouts consistently during med school, even third year? How do you handle the unpredictable rotation schedules ? early a.m. workouts?

I know when I trained for my marathon, the 20 mile Saturdays would all be consumed by preparation/running/recovery. I wonder if I'll have that luxury in med school

any practical advice and experiences are welcomed

thanks

There are times during 3rd year when you won't have the time to train exactly the way you would like to, but 1st, 2nd, and 4th year you should be able to find time to train easily. During the pre-clinical years your schedule breaks down very much like it does in college--as in you, largely, set your own schedule with regards to studying, ECs, exercise etc. You have classes to go to but they generally start at a reasonable time in the morning and finish by early afternoon (often times earlier or with large gaps of time when you could run). As for 3rd year, well, you just have to set priorities and do your best to train as much as you can.

As for "making sacrifices," like I said, you have to set your priorities, but being active in triathlons/marathons/etc shouldn't preclude you from having a social life, or being able to study, or do ECs, or land a competitive residency. With regards to the last one I think it's quite the opposite. In fact, an interviewer at a high ranking program told me she likes seeing applicants who remain active in those kind of activities because finding time to train and compete while being successful in medical school shows you can, "walk and chew gum at the same time."
 

ironman7

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I think it will be a great way for me to relieve stress, and have something outside of class that motivates me. I'm not a big T.V person, and I can see training being my main out-of-class activity. It's also great way to stay in shape and look great!

That is a great reason chemu to stay in shape!

Doing any sport in med school is possible but (like how everyone says) you need schedule yourself accordingly.

A good friend of my mine who goes to UofC (3rd year), trains in brazilian jujitsu with me plus runs 5ks and 10ks races. He is married and enjoys his life.

Also look into stairclimbing, now thats fun and challenging!
 

EBKame

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I find there is something intrinsic about the medical school weeding out process and culture of perfectionism that drives med students to be extremists. I started running marathons my last year as a premed in college. My time was 4:30 and when I ran it again between first and second year of med school I had almost cut 20 minutes off of my time. I found that the training kept me focused and motivated to study for final exams. It also gives you the sense that you are living for a little more than just medicine. I think it is an excellent way to challenge yourself beyond academics.
 

chemu

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I find there is something intrinsic about the medical school weeding out process and culture of perfectionism that drives med students to be extremists. I started running marathons my last year as a premed in college. My time was 4:30 and when I ran it again between first and second year of med school I had almost cut 20 minutes off of my time. I found that the training kept me focused and motivated to study for final exams. It also gives you the sense that you are living for a little more than just medicine. I think it is an excellent way to challenge yourself beyond academics.

thanks EBKame! My first marathon time was close to yours. Congrats for your marked improvement. I'm looking to train for half's this year, work on speed and endurance, with the goal of marked time improvement next full marathon!

good luck with your training
 

xcgirl

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I'm running my first marathon on sunday and will be a 1st year starting in the fall. Hopefully I'll have time like all of you to keep running and training while studying :)
 

Bcblazer

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The New Orleans Mardi Gras Marathon was my first, and that was a nice flat one. I'm planning on doing three more this year, including Chicago, and then I'll do Boston next April. It's a blast.
 

Mr. Freeze

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I can't copy/paste the link on account of an open test bank, but google Amanda Stevens, and it's like 4 from the top, the one that has oumedical in the title. She put off her clinical years to pursue the tri thing for awhile.
 
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