Feb 7, 2010
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Ahh! I keep getting these two confused.

What's a good way to remember what these two hormones do? and how they act?

If anyone can link to esp helpful guides/videos/content review on renal function that would also be much appreciated.
 
Mar 16, 2013
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A good way to remember the difference between the two hormones is to understand their names and work through the logic behind their mechanisms of action.

ADH stands for antidiuretic hormone; a diuretic is something that increases urinary output, so ADH has to be a compound that decreases urinary output by conserving water. The only way to increase water conservation in the nephron without affecting secretion of anything else is to increase water reabsorption; thus, ADH must act on a part of the nephron that is normally impermeable to water, the distal tubules and collecting ducts. If you can remember that ADH is secreted by the posterior pituitary, you can deduce more about its mechanism of action. Hormones secreted by the posterior pituitary are synthesized in the hypothalamus, packaged in vesicles, and transported down axons that terminate in the posterior pituitary. Because they are packaged in vesicles to be secreted on demand, posterior pituitary hormones like ADH cannot be lipid soluble. Thus, ADH has to bind to receptors on the basolateral membranes of cells of the distal tubules and collecting ducts in order to make those cells' apical membranes more permeable to water. (When ADH binds to V2 receptors on the basolateral membrane, the cell inserts aquaporins into its apical membrane.)

Aldosterone is a steroid hormone (like testosterone or progesterone). Steroid hormones work by altering gene transciption, since they can cross lipid membranes and bind to intracellular receptors. Aldosterone, among other things, upregulates transcription of the Na+/K+ pump gene. Since they control the ECF/ICF concentrations of Na+ and K+, Na+/K+ pumps will be found on the basolateral membranes of cells of the nephron (Apical membranes don't touch the ECF.). What would a larger number of Na+/K+ pumps do? It would shift Na+ from the cell into the blood across the basolateral membrane; as we know, the concentration of Na+ inside a cell usually stays constant, so to compensate Na+ will diffuse across the apical membrane from the filtrate into the cell, effecting a net removal of Na+ from the filtrate into the blood. By the same reasoning, a net secretion of K+ from the blood into the filtrate is effected. Conservation of Na+ is aldosterone's primary function.
 

JoeKing

Determined Member
Nov 28, 2012
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Also know that ADH is a peptide (neuro)hormone. Meaning it binds to membrane receptors. Whereas Aldosterone is a Steroid, and binds to nuclear/cytoplasmic receptors. AldoSTERONE (STERONE= STEROID)
 
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P
Feb 7, 2010
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I've always had a hard time understanding this topic, but this video really helped. Thought I'd put it on here for everyone to see.

 

jlescher

5+ Year Member
Feb 16, 2012
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Ahh! I keep getting these two confused.

What's a good way to remember what these two hormones do? and how they act?

If anyone can link to esp helpful guides/videos/content review on renal function that would also be much appreciated.
I've always remembered ADH's function by the nemonic, Always Digging Holes. The water in the urine flows through the holes into the renal parenchyma.