scrappysurfer

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Ross434 said:
good idea? for essays and such?
since this particular complication will continue to affect your ability to study, it might call into question your suitability for medicine. if you have solid stats it might not be a problem, but i don't see how it would help you.
 
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Ross434

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scrappysurfer said:
since this particular complication will continue to affect your ability to study, it might call into question your suitability for medicine. if you have solid stats it might not be a problem, but i don't see how it would help you.
I figure, if you have the stats, it already shows them you have what it takes. But if it could be used as a way of talking about overcoming adversity and finding out about yourself, i mean, everybody likes that.. heh
 
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melimi

way too many people "suffer from" ADHD now a days for it to make u "special" in any way
 
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Ross434

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melimi said:
way too many people "suffer from" ADHD now a days for it to make u "special" in any way
More people probably had a family illness or a parent/relative that was a doctor than had add.
 

durak

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I want to know how those with ADHD survived the MCAT.

I don't have it, although I think I experienced an acute onset during the verbal section. Thankfully it was gone the next morning. Kudos to anyone with this condition who did well on it - that's pretty impressive.
 

SanDiegoSOD

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A lot of us have had ADD. I always denied this fact as Ritalin/Dexadrine was shoved down my throat as a child, but later discovered how true the diagnosis was in college when I actually had to learn how to concentrate. While it may be more difficult for us to study or relax than it is for others, I don't really think it's worth much emphasis in your application. You will need to control your ADHD as a med student, as a resident, as a physician, etc., so I think a story about how tough life is with ADHD will be more of a sign of weakness than a sign of strength of overcoming opposition. I actually don't plan on even mentioning ADHD in my application, and I won't bring it up unless asked about. :thumbup:
 

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A pre-med advisor told me about an applicant who wrote his PS about how he was diagnosed with clinical depression when he was ten yo and then overcame it through college. He had great scores and was rejected everywhere. Next year he did not mention it and got into several schools. Go figure. It's obviously not ADHD, but the're may be a parallel there. Keep down possible red flags.
 
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Ross434

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Wilbury said:
A pre-med advisor told me about an applicant who wrote his PS about how he was diagnosed with clinical depression when he was ten yo and then overcame it through college. He had great scores and was rejected everywhere. Next year he did not mention it and got into several schools. Go figure. It's obviously not ADHD, but the're may be a parallel there. Keep down possible red flags.
What if its really a major part of who you are and really influenced how motivated you are and is evidence of being a hard worker that is not afraid of seemingly impossible challenges. Plus, disciminating against people for medical reasons is illegal. If he had such great scores, why didnt he raise a fuss?


I think a lot of people here look down on ADHD as not being that big of a thing (after all, EVERYONE apparently has it), when in actuality, people who truly have the disorder have really come a long way just to apply to medical school. Its more of a deal than a lot of people here want to believe. Maybe its because they think its a cop out or something.
 

SanDiegoSOD

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Ross434 said:
I think a lot of people here look down on ADHD as not being that big of a thing (after all, EVERYONE apparently has it), when in actuality, people who truly have the disorder have really come a long way just to apply to medical school. Its more of a deal than a lot of people here want to believe. Maybe its because they think its a cop out or something.

The problem is is that in the late 80's/early 90's, ADD and ADHD were extremely over-diagnosed, so it does seem like everyone in our generation has ADHD. :thumbdown:
 

beep

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Unless you need to disclose to explain important activities, don't do it. Discrimination is real, and medical school admissions so competetive and "mysterious" and various place-to-place that it would be very hard to prove discrimination. Besides, you want to go to a school, not sue one. Get in and then work towards changing attitudes about ADHD.
 

lfesiam

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ADHD is a no go on the essay, try something positive
 

hopeful32

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lfesiam said:
ADHD is a no go on the essay, try something positive
I don't know about that. I made straight A's all through high school and on every humanities coures I took in college, but I struggled with sciences. I was and am premed so not doing well in the sciences was a real problem. I studied for hours and hours for exams-with other people, by myself, in quiet places, with a tutor - following every bit of advice I could get, to no real avail. I managed to pull Bs and a couple of Cs on every science course I took. I couldn't understand it. At the very end of my senior Spring in college, it was finally suggested I talk to a learning specialist to see if anything else was going on with me. A diagnosis of mild ADHD finally reconciled how I could study for so long and so hard, without the focus and efficiency to really LEARN the material and recall it on the exams. This was both fantastic and devastating news.

Since I was done with college, I decided to take two years off to get to know myself, how I learn, and strategies that work for me to combat this issue. I took classes at a post-bac program to beef up my science GPA and change the way I studied. It was really frustrating that it took four years of struggle in college to figure this out and I feel like a lot of that time was wasted because I was continually hitting my head against a wall. Now, however, I know how to manage it. I'm making high A's in sciences and doing well. I know I'll do fine in medical school. It's about learning differently than how I was taught. I've experimented with stimulant meds, extended time on tests, and dozens of study environments.

I will admit that I did very average on the MCAT and I think the biggest challenge will be taking the boards just given my need for more time. It's not that I don't know the material, but accessing information and organizing my thoughts take longer for me and that is my ADHD at work. Hopefully, I'll continue to find new strategies to perform well on standardized tests. I know non of this will affect my ability to be a fantastic doctor; it just makes the road bumpier.

I wrote a letter to each school telling my story, and I emphasized that I have worked hard and improved my academic record. I imagine there are schools that may have cut me based on this letter or my numbers [schools which, frankly, I probably wouldn't want to attend anyway], but then there are plenty that are considering me. So, I think it is a gamble. I think I had to write a letter to explain my circumstances and my grades during college. I think someone will take my situation seriously and look beyond what my numbers were two years ago. I think my story is positive.