JellyVoodoo

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Hello everyone! I'm not sure if this is the right thread for these questions, but here goes. I'm just starting premed and have a 3.9 sGPA and 3.5 cGPA, I've been volunteering in the community at animal shelters and signing up for any volunteer work that my college posts. Where would I start if I wanted to get some research experience? My intended school doesn't list any math courses as a requirement, do you think this is accurate? What degree did you have when you applied to med school? Will nursing be enough or should I go get a biology degree or something? What extracurriculars did you do, how much shadowing, any research? Do they care about your overall GPA or just your science GPA? Does your science GPA mean all science courses, or just those that are required for premed? I've just graduated with an AS in nursing, will the clinical hours I did during school count for anything on my application? I'm struggling on whether I should spring for a BS in something while minoring in premed, or just make premed my focus and get to the required 90 credit hours that my school of choice asks for, since it says MOST matriculate with a BA or BS, I'm wondering if it's possible to get in with an AS + premed courses instead. Any guidance you can give me would be much appreciated! I have no friends in the program, am a first generation college student with no one to turn to for advice, and none of my current professors seem to know anything about it.
 

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The people who get into med school without a bachelors are like aliens; they technically can exist but no one (at least around here) has ever met one.
 
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JellyVoodoo

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I wonder then if I should get my BS in nursing or if a different major might improve my chances.
 

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I wonder then if I should get my BS in nursing or if a different major might improve my chances.
Major doesn't matter, though there is data that shows that vocational majors (like nursing) perform worse on the MCAT than other majors.
 

RN MD 2017

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Major doesn't matter, though there is data that shows that vocational majors (like nursing) perform worse on the MCAT than other majors.
Do you mind directing me to that data? I'd like to take a look at it.
 

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You have a MCAT score? Search SDN for RN to MD. Do plan to work as a nurse? I'm not sure all of of your nursing classes will even be applicable to your MD program. Slow down and do much reading. You have lots to learn and do!


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mw18

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My intended school doesn't list any math courses as a requirement
A few things. First, you're going to need a bachelor's degree. If you have a million applications for each seat and they all have a bachelor's and one person doesn't, you're likely not going to interview the one without it. The 90 hour limit is more to make sure that the people they interview DURING THEIR SENIOR YEAR, will be on pace to actually graduate if accepted. Secondly, your clinical exposure in nursing school definitely counts. Third, premeds unfortunately do not have the luxury to have an intended school. You need to apply to 15 or so, I would say at least. Also, your science GPA includes all science classes, not just prereqs, and math classes (BPCM - Biology, physics, chemistry, math). And as said before, any major will suffice. People do best at what they are interested in. However, I think that and RN to BSN would be the easiest transition for you. Most nurses I know don't consider these programs to be that difficult (learning more theory than actual nursing practice) and many are online so it would allow you the flexibility to focus on your prereqs.
 

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I cannot recommend a nursing degree if your goal is medical school.
Any non-vocational major is fine as long as you take the classes that will provide the content necessary for a strong MCAT score.
 
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mw18

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I cannot recommend a nursing degree if your goal is medical school.
Any non-vocational major is fine as long as you take the classes that will provide the content necessary for a strong MCAT score.
I had always heard there was a bias, but wasn't sure there still was. So even though OP already has a nursing degree, he should go a different direction for the bachelor's? That's interesting. Obviously you know more about it than I do.
 

RN MD 2017

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I cannot recommend a nursing degree if your goal is medical school.
Any non-vocational major is fine as long as you take the classes that will provide the content necessary for a strong MCAT score.
Is there a bias against nursing majors in admissions? Or is choosing another major simply more pragmatic?
 
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JellyVoodoo

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Vocational majors are viewed askance.
Nurses who have subsequently met all expectations are not
I'm not sure what you're trying to say.

I have heard that nurses do not perform as well on the MCAT and I intend to make up for whatever may be causing that deficit by focusing very hard on my science studies and even taking extra classes if I have to.
 
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JellyVoodoo

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A few things. First, you're going to need a bachelor's degree. If you have a million applications for each seat and they all have a bachelor's and one person doesn't, you're likely not going to interview the one without it. The 90 hour limit is more to make sure that the people they interview DURING THEIR SENIOR YEAR, will be on pace to actually graduate if accepted. Secondly, your clinical exposure in nursing school definitely counts. Third, premeds unfortunately do not have the luxury to have an intended school. You need to apply to 15 or so, I would say at least. Also, your science GPA includes all science classes, not just prereqs, and math classes (BPCM - Biology, physics, chemistry, math). And as said before, any major will suffice. People do best at what they are interested in. However, I think that and RN to BSN would be the easiest transition for you. Most nurses I know don't consider these programs to be that difficult (learning more theory than actual nursing practice) and many are online so it would allow you the flexibility to focus on your prereqs.
Thank you for so much info! Yes, I had thought on it after I made this post and realized that 90 credit hours may be required by the school I want to go to, but that doesn't mean that every applicant stops there and that I need a BS to be competitive. I intend to begin those classes in the spring and minor in premed courses. I am still looking into a BSN versus other degree paths, with the best option looking like a BSN at this point because almost all of the classes are online and I'll be able to work at the same time. I worked through my ASN so I didn't have to take out any student loans, I'll do the same through my BSN.
 
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JellyVoodoo

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You have a MCAT score? Search SDN for RN to MD. Do plan to work as a nurse? I'm not sure all of of your nursing classes will even be applicable to your MD program. Slow down and do much reading. You have lots to learn and do!
I haven't taken the MCAT yet, I definitely won't be ready for a while. I will be working as a nurse while I'm earning a BS and doing premed courses, hopefully I'll be able to spend a great deal of time in the ER or ICU where it seems the patients are very diverse and there's a lot of learning to do. I don't think all of my nursing courses will be applicable to MD, but medicine is my passion and I couldn't see myself being in a major outside medicine, even before med school. It's just where I'm most comfortable, so I thought I'd start in nursing to get some experience with patients, pharmacology, pathophysiology, etc.
 

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I'm not sure what you're trying to say..
Vocational majors are not considered academically rigorous by many reviewers.
Thus, they suspect that candidates (even those who did well in such a major), may not have acquired the skills necessary for medical school.
 
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Vocational majors are not considered academically rigorous by many reviewers.
Thus, they suspect that candidates (even those who did well in such a major), may not have acquired the skills necessary for medical school.
So do you think they would pass over my application just because I had a BSN? If I did get a BSN (just because it seems like the logical next step) would there be anything else I could do to prove that I have what it takes to withstand med school? I had previously thought that premed courses were what they made that judgement with.
 

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What med school doesn't require a Bachelors for matriculation? And you can certainly have a dream school but it's not really a good idea to have" a school of choice"! You might end up really disappointed.


You can major in anything you want, just as long as you do well. It does make sense to pursue a BSN if you are going to be a nurse long term or have an interest in moving up the professional nursing ladder. There are lots of opportunities for nurses. Have you thought about physician assistants(PA)? If you don't see yourself nursing forever, why get a BSN? Branch out and see where you end up. Be careful of taking a ton of online courses. I'm not sure how med schools view them or if they even count them. They probably do but you never know. Admission the medical school get more competitive every year. You have to make sure you present the best application possible. Spend some time reading the forums and see what others(your competition) are doing. You might be surprised.


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So do you think they would pass over my application just because I had a BSN? If I did get a BSN (just because it seems like the logical next step) would there be anything else I could do to prove that I have what it takes to withstand med school? I had previously thought that premed courses were what they made that judgement with.
Nursing courses are not considered BCPM, for example.
 
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Vocational majors are not considered academically rigorous by many reviewers.
Thus, they suspect that candidates (even those who did well in such a major), may not have acquired the skills necessary for medical school.
Gyngyn, I respect your opinion and definitely am grateful for the advice you give on SDN, but I have to wonder why this is the case. This might be n=1 but I found that my nursing classes were harder than organic, genetics, physics, etc. The nursing classes are not nearly as challenging on an intellectual level, but they require you to master (and be able to apply) a large quantity of material. In addition, my university required >95% for an A in nursing classes, whereas science classes were on a >93% scale. In several classes I was in the highest grade was an A-, and that was the only A that was given in the entire class. If not for this crazy grading scale, I would have had a 4.0 my last two years. When I did my post-bac to finish prerequisites, I was relieved that the classes were easier than the nursing classes I had taken. I do understand that med schools want the "hard science" background, but there are a lot of bright nursing students that could be a great fit for some schools. I suspect lower MCAT scores is what weeds most of them out, though.
 
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What med school doesn't require a Bachelors for matriculation? And you can certainly have a dream school but it's not really a good idea to have" a school of choice"! You might end up really disappointed.


You can major in anything you want, just as long as you do well. It does make sense to pursue a BSN if you are going to be a nurse long term or have an interest in moving up the professional nursing ladder. There are lots of opportunities for nurses. Have you thought about physician assistants(PA)? If you don't see yourself nursing forever, why get a BSN? Branch out and see where you end up. Be careful of taking a ton of online courses. I'm not sure how med schools view them or if they even count them. They probably do but you never know. Admission the medical school get more competitive every year. You have to make sure you present the best application possible. Spend some time reading the forums and see what others(your competition) are doing. You might be surprised.
The one I was looking at didn't specifically ask for one, just "90 credit hours completed at an accredited institution, including the required science courses." But I feel that getting a BS would give me my best shot and am coming to terms with the time commitment. BSN would be my best choice in case med school doesn't work out, then I could continue on and become an NP or DNP. I am going to meet with a university this week to talk about majoring in biology or chemistry and weigh the pros and cons against continuing my nursing education. I don't plan on being a nurse long term, per se, but rather I'm using my current degree to get my hands dirty in the hospital and get some real experience under my belt. I feel that I'll be able to cultivate relationships with the physicians, some of whom have probably graduated from the school I want to go to, maybe I could get a few LOR while I'm there! PA and DO aren't really on my radar, MD has been my dream for a long time, unfortunately I was unable to pursue a traditional degree track, so I chose the degree that would allow me to work as soon as possible while also incorporating my love for medicine. I am a long time lurker here, and that's how I learned about research experience and how valuable volunteer work is. Lucky me, I've been doing volunteer work since I was 15.
 
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Gyngyn, I respect your opinion and definitely am grateful for the advice you give on SDN, but I have to wonder why this is the case. This might be n=1 but I found that my nursing classes were harder than organic, genetics, physics, etc. The nursing classes are not nearly as challenging on an intellectual level, but they require you to master (and be able to apply) a large quantity of material. In addition, my university required >95% for an A in nursing classes, whereas science classes were on a >93% scale. In several classes I was in the highest grade was an A-, and that was the only A that was given in the entire class. If not for this crazy grading scale, I would have had a 4.0 my last two years. When I did my post-bac to finish prerequisites, I was relieved that the classes were easier than the nursing classes I had taken. I do understand that med schools want the "hard science" background, but there are a lot of bright nursing students that could be a great fit for some schools. I suspect lower MCAT scores is what weeds most of them out, though.
My nursing courses were not at all easy and it makes me very sad that the major is looked down on by medical school admissions. Every single one of my friends failed out, I graduated with only a handful of my original classmates, the grading scale at my institution is as harsh as it is at yours, and very often no As were given. The dean of my school is also on the state board of nursing here and takes her duties very seriously, weeding so vigorously that over half of RN students are demoted to LPN and the NCLEX pass rate is 100%. Taking advanced science courses at night after my nursing classes were finished was a reprieve.
 

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Gyngyn, I respect your opinion and definitely am grateful for the advice you give on SDN, but I have to wonder why this is the case. This might be n=1 but I found that my nursing classes were harder than organic, genetics, physics, etc. The nursing classes are not nearly as challenging on an intellectual level, but they require you to master (and be able to apply) a large quantity of material. In addition, my university required >95% for an A in nursing classes, whereas science classes were on a >93% scale. In several classes I was in the highest grade was an A-, and that was the only A that was given in the entire class. If not for this crazy grading scale, I would have had a 4.0 my last two years. When I did my post-bac to finish prerequisites, I was relieved that the classes were easier than the nursing classes I had taken. I do understand that med schools want the "hard science" background, but there are a lot of bright nursing students that could be a great fit for some schools. I suspect lower MCAT scores is what weeds most of them out, though.
I love nurses.
I'm offering my observation that someone planning a medical school application with several choices of major needs to be aware that many reviewers have the fixed belief that a nursing degree is "different" in away that does not benefit the applicant.
Nurses who already have a degree, along with experience and strong MCAT scores will find fertile field at many schools (including mine).
 

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I love nurses.
I'm offering my observation that someone planning a medical school application with several choices of major needs to be aware that many reviewers have the fixed belief that a nursing degree is "different" in away that does not benefit the applicant.
Nurses who already have a degree, along with experience and strong MCAT scores will find fertile field at many schools (including mine).
Gotcha. I didn't think you were bashing nurses, I just wanted to know why this was the case. I agree that nursing is fundamentally different from other majors. From where I am now, I can say that having a biology-based foundation is probably more beneficial to those heading to med school. OP, think about finishing that degree with a B.S. in one of the hard sciences. It'll probably serve you better in the long run. At least in my area, it won't make a significant difference in your pay or ability to practice if you choose to forgo the BSN in favor of a biology degree. That ASN will do just fine.
 
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Getting a BSN is only 8 additional nursing courses if I did decide to go that direction, so it's not like I would be facing a gigantic time commitment if I elected to go into biology first and then med school didn't work out and I needed a BSN. I am a little scared of the push for all nurses to have a BSN by 2020, but I'm hoping by then I'll be a med student and won't have to worry about it. The consistently low MCAT scores for those that are already in healthcare does worry me, but I plan to make up for it with extra 'hard science' courses. I definitely won't be running to take the MCAT as soon as I get done with the bare minimum premed courses, I want to make sure I'm very well prepared and have all my ducks in a row.
 
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JellyVoodoo

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I love nurses.
I'm offering my observation that someone planning a medical school application with several choices of major needs to be aware that many reviewers have the fixed belief that a nursing degree is "different" in away that does not benefit the applicant.
Nurses who already have a degree, along with experience and strong MCAT scores will find fertile field at many schools (including mine).
I also wonder about the medical schools that say they're looking for students with diverse degrees, I don't remember where I read it, but I saw that some med schools were saying a BA in something like art history was acceptable as long as the science prereqs were done. I wonder if the admissions officials think that they are not well prepared.
 
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The people who get into med school without a bachelors are like aliens; they technically can exist but no one (at least around here) has ever met one.
I'm thinking of applying without some of the prereqs --- do people do this often - am I an alien as well?
 
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Without them as in you're not going to take them at all?
 

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I also wonder about the medical schools that say they're looking for students with diverse degrees, I don't remember where I read it, but I saw that some med schools were saying a BA in something like art history was acceptable as long as the science prereqs were done. I wonder if the admissions officials think that they are not well prepared.
We do like non-science degrees. Art History and English are not vocational degrees, though.
 
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What a strange dynamic. I thought going into nursing and beginning my career in medicine would show conviction and practicality, not be a detractor :sour:
 

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The idea that determination, conviction etc will be major determinants in the med school application process is, sadly a pre-med delusion.

Item #2 we're looking for is that you can survive a med school curriculum. Item #1 is that you'll make a good doctor.

Back when I was a post-doc, my wife taught chemistry to nursing students. It was basically high school chemistry.


What a strange dynamic. I thought going into nursing and beginning my career in medicine would show conviction and practicality, not be a detractor :sour:
 
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So I was perusing this forum and have a few things instead of $0.02 I will put $0.06 (2 for each point):

1. I noticed that you mentioned that you felt nursing classes were harder than your regular prereqs. Thats awesome! however I have to wonder which classes you're talking about hah try taking organic chem at 9am and doing a test a 8am on a friday! not easy.....as for the other courses I took microbio for nurses because I was a health science major before I switched to bio......It was the only course I didn't study for it wasn't hard and the chem they were freaking out about was the INTRO for my general chem class (day 1 stuff). I suggest take some more courses and do some higher level ones and make sure they are truly easy before you commit to the field.

2. I totally get MD is the dream but being that you have what I am assuming with a AS is 40-50 credits? that don't count towards the science GPA it could be a problem. DO schools will look very favorable on you just as MD will. The thing that makes people look at DO schools is when their MCAT comes back! lol then all of a sudden it becomes hmmm maybe it isnt that bad after all. Again aim for the moon and if you can't get there then try other schools.

3. As for your determination factor....EVERY PREMED CLAIMS THIS! we all say we feel we're destined to be doctors and love medicine.....sadly all that matters is the facts and figures because people like our friend @Goro has to read 1000s of apps and needs to have a way to screen us. End of the day your ECs and determination factor means nothing until you have the stats to get the door open and then the ECs allow you to walk through and together they both let you have the white coat.

Like I said $0.06 has been input....maybe I should've said $0.10 that was a lot to type LOL
 
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Nursing courses are not considered BCPM, for example.
Random, but, AACOMAS did calculate my nursing courses as part of my science GPA. TMDSAS did not.
Thank you for so much info! Yes, I had thought on it after I made this post and realized that 90 credit hours may be required by the school I want to go to, but that doesn't mean that every applicant stops there and that I need a BS to be competitive. I intend to begin those classes in the spring and minor in premed courses. I am still looking into a BSN versus other degree paths, with the best option looking like a BSN at this point because almost all of the classes are online and I'll be able to work at the same time. I worked through my ASN so I didn't have to take out any student loans, I'll do the same through my BSN.
My BSN was all online. Listed in my apps as well. Took all sciences in person. Did well on the MCAT. Five interviews scheduled thus far. I basically did not have an option. I had to work and working full-time would not accommodate pursuing a different bachelor's degree.



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Random, but, AACOMAS did calculate my nursing courses as part of my science GPA. TMDSAS did not.

My BSN was all online. Listed in my apps as well. Took all sciences in person. Did well on the MCAT. Five interviews scheduled thus far. I basically did not have an option. I had to work and working full-time would not accommodate pursuing a different bachelor's degree.



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DO schools have a much more generous view on applications, in many ways.
A strong MCAT is an application's best tonic (for either system), though!
 
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The idea that determination, conviction etc will be major determinants in the med school application process is, sadly a pre-med delusion.

Item #2 we're looking for is that you can survive a med school curriculum. Item #1 is that you'll make a good doctor.

Back when I was a post-doc, my wife taught chemistry to nursing students. It was basically high school chemistry.
So I was perusing this forum and have a few things instead of $0.02 I will put $0.06 (2 for each point):

1. I noticed that you mentioned that you felt nursing classes were harder than your regular prereqs. Thats awesome! however I have to wonder which classes you're talking about hah try taking organic chem at 9am and doing a test a 8am on a friday! not easy.....as for the other courses I took microbio for nurses because I was a health science major before I switched to bio......It was the only course I didn't study for it wasn't hard and the chem they were freaking out about was the INTRO for my general chem class (day 1 stuff). I suggest take some more courses and do some higher level ones and make sure they are truly easy before you commit to the field.

2. I totally get MD is the dream but being that you have what I am assuming with a AS is 40-50 credits? that don't count towards the science GPA it could be a problem. DO schools will look very favorable on you just as MD will. The thing that makes people look at DO schools is when their MCAT comes back! lol then all of a sudden it becomes hmmm maybe it isnt that bad after all. Again aim for the moon and if you can't get there then try other schools.

3. As for your determination factor....EVERY PREMED CLAIMS THIS! we all say we feel we're destined to be doctors and love medicine.....sadly all that matters is the facts and figures because people like our friend @Goro has to read 1000s of apps and needs to have a way to screen us. End of the day your ECs and determination factor means nothing until you have the stats to get the door open and then the ECs allow you to walk through and together they both let you have the white coat.

Like I said $0.06 has been input....maybe I should've said $0.10 that was a lot to type LOL
DO schools have a much more generous view on applications, in many ways.
A strong MCAT is an application's best tonic (for either system), though!
I skipped a lot of nursing science in favor of more advanced sciences because I knew I'd eventually have to take them for a BS, and I understand that immeasurable things like determination and conviction are not necessarily going to help me gain admission, but they will keep me sane on my journey there and reassure me that this is what I'm meant to do. All I can do otherwise is bust ass to impress on paper. I am looking at classes that will prove I can survive the med curriculum, but how can I best prove that I'll make a good doctor? What extra-curriculars or other activities would stand out to you?

I do expect ochem to be hard, and I plan to do a lot of prep for it because I heard it is a 'weed out' class. ASN was 65 but I graduated with 72 because of the extra credits from more advanced science. I understand that every med says that they're very determined, and I don't expect to be handed anything because of it. I very much intend to back it up on paper. I only mentioned my determination on this forum to say that I'm not vacillating between med school and something else.

Of course, I do plan on studying very hard for the MCAT, probably harder than anything I've ever studied for in the past. My personal goal is a 510 or 511, I don't know if that is fantastic overall, but my dream school has a median of 509.
 
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Random, but, AACOMAS did calculate my nursing courses as part of my science GPA. TMDSAS did not.

My BSN was all online. Listed in my apps as well. Took all sciences in person. Did well on the MCAT. Five interviews scheduled thus far. I basically did not have an option. I had to work and working full-time would not accommodate pursuing a different bachelor's degree.
I have spent a couple of days doing research and it looks like the university I will be attending also has all online RN to BSN courses but with a couple of clinicals with a preceptor. The science courses will be in person, but I prefer it that way. I've heard the nursing GPA thing both ways now, I saw on the RN to MD thread that none of the OPs nursing courses were factored in, but I'm just going to assume they will be and keep doing well in them. If I were to pursue another major, it wouldn't be online and I wouldn't be able to work as much, if at all, and it just isn't feasible. Some people are lucky enough to be able to take 8 years and just go to school full time, but I think the best I would be able to do would be the 4 years in med school, and even then I'd probably still work during breaks.
 

PossibleDOC?

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I skipped a lot of nursing science in favor of more advanced sciences because I knew I'd eventually have to take them for a BS, and I understand that immeasurable things like determination and conviction are not necessarily going to help me be admitted, but they will keep me sane on my journey there and reassure me that this is what I'm meant to do. All I can do otherwise is bust ass to impress on paper. I am looking at classes that will prove I can survive the med curriculum, but how can I best prove that I'll make a good doctor? What extra-curriculars or other activities would stand out to you?

I do expect ochem to be hard, and I plan to do a lot of prep for it because I heard it is a 'weed out' class. ASN was 65 but I graduated with 72 because of the extra credits from more advanced science. I understand that every med says that they're very determined, and I don't expect to be handed anything because of it. I very much intend to back it up on paper. I only mentioned my determination on this forum to say that I'm not vacillating between med school and something else.

Of course, I do plan on studying very hard for the MCAT, probably harder than anything I've ever studied for in the past. My personal goal is a 510 or 511, I don't know if that is fantastic overall, but my dream school has a median of 509.

What you really need to do first off is get your prereqs done with As and then study for the MCAT the median is a 509.....you need a 512 or higher for a guaranteed chance at an acceptance. The MCAT is hard every premed goes into it saying im going to study my ass off and honestly it all comes down to luck in my opinion having taken the test 3 times. I stress to ever premed and I will stress to you this test will determine everything I have seen people with 4.0s get a 28 on the old one and get in no where and people with 3.8s and 36s get into MD/PhD programs and some with a 3.0 and 32 get into MD schools. As you can imagine these are all n=1.

I just try to make every premed realize that we all really aren't out of control special we all have something we feel makes us different but honestly stats are all that matter. I applied 3 times and got in the last time and there are so many factors that go into it that luck plays a big part amongst others but I won't post it in mixed company ;)
 
OP
JellyVoodoo

JellyVoodoo

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What you really need to do first off is get your prereqs done with As and then study for the MCAT the median is a 509.....you need a 512 or higher for a guaranteed chance at an acceptance. The MCAT is hard every premed goes into it saying im going to study my ass off and honestly it all comes down to luck in my opinion having taken the test 3 times. I stress to ever premed and I will stress to you this test will determine everything I have seen people with 4.0s get a 28 on the old one and get in no where and people with 3.8s and 36s get into MD/PhD programs and some with a 3.0 and 32 get into MD schools. As you can imagine these are all n=1.

I just try to make every premed realize that we all really aren't out of control special we all have something we feel makes us different but honestly stats are all that matter. I applied 3 times and got in the last time and there are so many factors that go into it that luck plays a big part amongst others but I won't post it in mixed company ;)
Do you feel like you were more well prepared and did better with each retest? If it were up to me, I would just do prereqs and the MCAT, but others have told me there's no chance to get in without a BS or BA, so I'll do the prereqs along with the program courses. No, I realize I'm not a genius like every honors high school kid does when they get into the real world and people stop telling them how exceptional and brilliant they are. I'm just average, but I'm doing my best! :X3: Did you get into MD or DO? I was kind of wondering if there was a little luck involved with who your competition is each cycle, etc... Also, what did you do for those 2 or 3 years you were waiting to get in, take other classes?
 
OP
JellyVoodoo

JellyVoodoo

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Actually looking back at my transcript, only 37 credits are nursing, the others are science and the basics (eng, psych, soc). I really enjoy science, real facts, no feelings. :laugh:
 

PossibleDOC?

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Mar 30, 2016
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Do you feel like you were more well prepared and did better with each retest? If it were up to me, I would just do prereqs and the MCAT, but others have told me there's no chance to get in without a BS or BA, so I'll do the prereqs along with the program courses. No, I realize I'm not a genius like every honors high school kid does when they get into the real world and people stop telling them how exceptional and brilliant they are. I'm just average, but I'm doing my best! :X3: Did you get into MD or DO? I was kind of wondering if there was a little luck involved with who your competition is each cycle, etc... Also, what did you do for those 2 or 3 years you were waiting to get in, take other classes?

I got into DO and am totally happy that I get to become a physician because honestly the initials at the end of the jacket don't matter to me. As for the testing it was a mixed bag and every year the competition gets more intense so really luck is playing more of a role because there are so many people with 4.0s and 35 MCAT or 512 or whatever
 
OP
JellyVoodoo

JellyVoodoo

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I'm going to have to do some more research on DO because I didn't even know they existed until I started lurking this forum, but I do know that the DO schools in my state are much more expensive than MD.
 

PossibleDOC?

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DO schools are usually private and are more expensive but at the end of the day you can't put a price tag on a dream career
 

ED I

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I love nurses.
I'm offering my observation that someone planning a medical school application with several choices of major needs to be aware that many reviewers have the fixed belief that a nursing degree is "different" in away that does not benefit the applicant.
Nurses who already have a degree, along with experience and strong MCAT scores will find fertile field at many schools (including mine).
Gyngyn, I respect your opinion and definitely am grateful for the advice you give on SDN, but I have to wonder why this is the case. This might be n=1 but I found that my nursing classes were harder than organic, genetics, physics, etc. The nursing classes are not nearly as challenging on an intellectual level, but they require you to master (and be able to apply) a large quantity of material. In addition, my university required >95% for an A in nursing classes, whereas science classes were on a >93% scale. In several classes I was in the highest grade was an A-, and that was the only A that was given in the entire class. If not for this crazy grading scale, I would have had a 4.0 my last two years. When I did my post-bac to finish prerequisites, I was relieved that the classes were easier than the nursing classes I had taken. I do understand that med schools want the "hard science" background, but there are a lot of bright nursing students that could be a great fit for some schools. I suspect lower MCAT scores is what weeds most of them out, though.
Hello...I'm an ED RN and a National Registry Paramedic, and I fundamentally disagree with the statement nursing classes were harder than Physics and Chem II, I will be taking O-Chem this summer...sciences are harder!!