advice for interview

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Perry, Nov 25, 2001.

  1. Perry

    Perry New Member

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    I'm interviewing next week and I had a question: would it be a good idea to update them about developments in my extracurriculars, and if so, how should I do it? I've been doing some new stuff since I mailed my application, and I'm not sure whether I should (a)just try to work it into my interview verbally (b)write an update letter. If I write a letter, at what time should I give it to the interviewer? Or should I just drop it off at the admissions office? For some reason it seems awkward to walk into the interview and hand them a piece of paper. Any advice would be much appreciated. Thanks!
     
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  3. Suz177

    Suz177 Senior Member
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    Usually interviewers will give you an opportunity to inform them about these sorts of things. Handing your interviewer a letter sounds very impersonal to me. I would try to work it into the conversation. Usually at the end it is more free form and you are allowed to take a little bit of lead. If you don't get an opportunity before then, thats your chance.
     
  4. Another idea might be to give them (possibly the secretary) an updated resume and ask them to put it in your file. That way you can mention the new stuff to the interviewer, but you also don't have to rely on him or her to relay the information to the rest of the committee. What if he forgets to mention it specificially in your review? If it's in your file, they should all be aware of it.
     
  5. mwilson

    mwilson treo
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    If it doesn't come up in the interview you could include that stuff in a thank you note to your interviewer. That way it will be documented as well as allowing you to maintain contact with the person who will be your "advocate" in the admissions process.
     

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