Advice for underclassmen

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by JennaB4MD, Oct 31, 2002.

  1. JennaB4MD

    JennaB4MD Member

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    For all underclassmen out there that still have room in your schedules for some classes....TAKE CLASSES IN HEALTH POLICY! I did, and every interview I have gone to has commented on them and asked me stuff about health care in other countries, problems with the US system, etc. and they have been totally impressed that I know something about the payment system in the US is structured, some of the problems, and that I can pull a few stats out in the interview. They aren't the most interesting classes, but they are so worth taking, and if you're planning on being a doctor, you damn better well know what you're going to be dealing with. I've also found that med schools are sick of idealists (I just wanna help people and being a doctor is such a rewarding profession all the time!) and they want people that know a thing or two about HMOs, Medicare, and stuff like that. DO IT! You won't regret it! :)
     
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  3. AegisZero

    AegisZero Senior Member

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    If you enjoy health policy courses, definitely take them. If you have no interest in them, just read some sites and texts on the matter during the summer before your interview. Don't take courses just because you think they will get you an easy road to med school, because if they turn out to be boring courses you will not do well in them.
     
  4. I've actually heard both sides of this. One adcom member told me that I should brush up on the current health care system so that I would sound like i knew what I was getting myself into.

    Then an adcom member from a diff school told me that using medical terms and pulling stats out of my head did nothing and at times would probably hurt me during my interview process. The reasons he gave were 1) it would make me seem less then genuine and 2) that most of the faculty conducting the interview at his school are science faculty who may or may not know about the fine details of health care.
     
  5. JennaB4MD

    JennaB4MD Member

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    Maybe it's just me, but I kinda think you should be interested in health policy if you wanna be an MD!!!!!
     
  6. marakah2

    marakah2 Member

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    i think the best advice for pre-meds is to get your application done early! submit the primary june 15 and every secondary within 2 weeks.

    this really, really affects admissions and gives you a major advantage (for those places with rolling admissions, which is not everywhere- i know this but most places are rolling)
     
  7. AegisZero

    AegisZero Senior Member

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    Jenna,
    Health policy is DEFINITELY useful, especially if you want to go into business administration or whatnot. But so are hundreds of other courses as well. There will be plenty of time to learn health policy in medical school and in the field. But yeah, if it interests you, thats awesome.
     
  8. laviddee

    laviddee Senior Member

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    i also agree that it's very important to KNOW about the status of healthcare - the problems and what YOU think are some valid solutions for it.
    However, you can learn all that stuff by reading a book rather than by taking a class.
    I figure if you take a class, and the interviewer sees that, then you better know exactly what you are talking about. if you do, well then it's expected.. if you don't know.. then you're screwed.

    if you didn't take the class, and you still know about health policy-- then it's more impressive.

    If i had to suggest a good class for underclassman-- i would look for a class called medical anthropology. It's a class i took as an undergrad where you learn about a variety of different medical practices in a wide range of cultures. How medicine is viewed in different areas of the world and how it's incorporated into the culture.

    But the other poster is right- the BEST ADVICE-- IRREGARDLESS OF CLASSES- is to get your apps in early. What a huge advantage that is.
    related to that- also take the april mcat- DON'T POSTPONE THE APRIL ONE so you can take the august.
     
  9. AegisZero

    AegisZero Senior Member

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    When are the primary AMCAS applications first posted online for access? Does anyone have the exact date in June (I heard its in early June, but not sure, also don't know what exact date)
     
  10. laviddee

    laviddee Senior Member

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    the exact date is whenever amcas is ready.
    it was supposed to be june 1st- but then they moved it back a week- then another week--
    b/c maybe they were fixing bugs-- whatever the case, they weren't ready right on June 1st- but they may be next year.

    If you keep checking their website- it'll tell you as the day gets closer what day you can expect to submit.

    Also- alot of people on SDN just tried to submit their app, and either it went through or it didn't.
    But have it ready to go by early June.
     
  11. Woots32

    Woots32 kinda funky, kinda fine

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    Because I know all of you were on the edge of your seats waiting for my $.02.... ;)

    1. Major in/take classes in a subject you enjoy, be it health policy, rhet, poly sci, or bio. Obviously you won't be able to do this all the time (read - orgo :mad: ), but you'll do better because you're interested - plus, you'll ACTUALLY BE INTERESTED.

    2. Get all your app materials in early. My premed advisor is bordering on scary about this, but it has paid off huge. This includes taking the April MCAT.

    3. Don't make your premed years all about getting into med school, otherwise you'll end up there and wonder where your undergrad went. College isn't just about getting to the next place - it's the journey, not the destination, yadda yadda yadda... Just make sure you're happy. I think interviewers have picked up on this - and it just makes sense. ;)

    4. Wax on, wax off.

    Now I must go catch a fly with chopsticks. Good luck to all. :)
     

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