Advice needed: beginning PT career in one area, but anticipating change in the future

Sep 21, 2014
8
0
Bay Area, CA
Status
Physical Therapist
Hey all,

As a very recent new grad PT, I am waiting on taking the NPTE and CA Law exam before I get my career started. For the past few days, I am realizing that it is likely that I will have to put my dream of working in orthopedics on hold for a couple years while I begin a career in potentially acute care/SNF in order to afford to make a dent on my huge student loans. I am anticipating working in one of these areas for a couple years, then switching over to the outpatient orthopedic setting...

If this were to be my plan, how would you recommend me discussing this plan of mine to my first employer, say during an interview or after? If this were you, would you even mention to your employer that you have the intention to change over to another setting?

I am wondering about the above as it may affect my chances of being hired and being seen as a short-term employee, which many employers would most likely rather hire a long-term employee...

Thank you in advance for sharing your thoughts. Anything is helpful!
 
Feb 12, 2017
434
190
Rural livin
Hey all,

As a very recent new grad PT, I am waiting on taking the NPTE and CA Law exam before I get my career started. For the past few days, I am realizing that it is likely that I will have to put my dream of working in orthopedics on hold for a couple years while I begin a career in potentially acute care/SNF in order to afford to make a dent on my huge student loans. I am anticipating working in one of these areas for a couple years, then switching over to the outpatient orthopedic setting...

If this were to be my plan, how would you recommend me discussing this plan of mine to my first employer, say during an interview or after? If this were you, would you even mention to your employer that you have the intention to change over to another setting?

I am wondering about the above as it may affect my chances of being hired and being seen as a short-term employee, which many employers would most likely rather hire a long-term employee...

Thank you in advance for sharing your thoughts. Anything is helpful!
I wouldn't mention it.
 

jblil

7+ Year Member
Dec 1, 2010
1,185
715
East Coast
OP - Try telling this to your girlfriend: "Honey, I will go out with you for the next 2 years. You'll cook for me, you'll take care of me, and you may even entertain thoughts of marriage... But at the end of those 2 years I will be leaving you for another girl." After you say this, please let us know which hospital room we should send flowers to.
 
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OP
J
Sep 21, 2014
8
0
Bay Area, CA
Status
Physical Therapist
OP - Try telling this to your girlfriend: "Honey, I will go out with you for the next 2 years. You'll cook for me, you'll take care of me, and you may even entertain thoughts of marriage... But at the end of those 2 years I will be leaving you for another girl." After you say this, please let us know which hospital room we should send flowers to.
Well said! Thank you
 

truthseeker

Senior Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 2, 2004
1,022
336
Status
I think the SNFs unfortunately expect high turnover. It is probably best left unsaid. It is probably assumed.
 
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NewTestament

7+ Year Member
Nov 4, 2010
1,326
421
Itinerant
Status
DPT / OTD
Your skill and your happiness are more important than your student loans. No SNFs. It's not worth the tradeoff.
 
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Schland

5+ Year Member
Jul 15, 2014
77
44
Florida
Status
Physical Therapist
I wouldn't mention it in an interview. I have had coworkers who were open with my boss early on that they weren't planning on staying long term (one was looking to move, one became an OT in the military and she told them when she was applying, others had plans for going into another setting). Any good manager would want to support your growth and happiness in your career. Obviously not all managers are the same. I tried to switch to another hospital within my system last year and I was terrified to tell my boss (I had to because anytime one of their employees applies for another job within the system they get notified and I wanted her to hear it from me before I did it and not by a email). I was worried if I didn't get it she would then see me as non loyal and treat me like crap. Well I didn't get it and she has never held it against me.

But staying with a company for a couple of years is more than enough time at one place. You just don't want to bounce around every few months because that is bad.

Also... you will eventually realize. NO company will ever have YOUR best interest in mind. You could give them all the loyalty in the world and then when cuts come and you have to go they will do it without a second thought. You have to put yourself first.
 
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Jul 13, 2017
62
38
Keep an open mind- you may love it and stay with it a lot longer than you think! I'm starting in an SNF too and honestly as long as I'm getting good raises every year and have the potential to move up I predict I'll be happy and stick around. If the raises are nonexistent or too small to make a big difference in my paycheck I'll probably look for employment elsewhere. I wouldn't say anything unless your mind is already made up and you're determined to move to outpatient...in which case why accept the position in the first place? Just my two cents. And as for skill development it is harder in inpatient but certainly not impossible. It's simply a different environment that tends to breed monotony rather than skill development but the environment will only change if PTs begin changing the way they do their jobs in that setting. If OP ortho is your calling and you know that you may be better off starting there instead of IP despite the pay differential.
 
Feb 12, 2015
33
11
Status
Physical Therapy Student
Don't mention that you want to change. You usually want to give the impression that you are planning on staying for a long time and looking for a forever job. Mention things like you want to find a company you want to grow and develop in. And down the road if you want to leave, you have every right to. 2 years is fine to leave, especially your first job. Some positions do have both settings, so that is something to consider looking for.
 
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