age of applicant: ever too young?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by jot, May 14, 2002.

  1. jot

    jot

    do you think there is an age that adcoms consider too young for medschool(md/phd)? i'm sure it is highly dependent on demonstratable maturity, but nevertheless. i'll still be 19 when applying and part of interviewing season, and i was wondering if there was anyone else who had this experience, or was asked about it. thanks.
     
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  3. intern in waiting

    intern in waiting Junior Member

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    I'm pretty sure you need to be 21 when you graduate to get a medical liscence (at least in PA) we had a student in my class, straigh MD who was 18!!
     
  4. The Fly

    The Fly Senior Member

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    There was a thread here a couple of months back about a 17 (yes, seventeen at graduation) year-old-who graduated from Sinai a few years back and who's now in his Optho residency somewhere in NYC. . .

    He finished NYC in two years, graduated when he was 13 and then began medical school where he finished in the usual four years.

    Now that's WAAAAAAAAAAY too young -- that poor kid will probably burn out at thirty after having had no childhood. I think that is absolutely depressing. . .
     
  5. Assassin

    Assassin Assassin

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    when i interviewed at UCONN, i was told they once admitted a 17 yr old
    ...and he already had a PhD <img border="0" alt="[Laughy]" title="" src="graemlins/laughy.gif" />
     
  6. matthew0126

    matthew0126 Anaheim Angels

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    I think if you are young you can't get around the first impression that you'll regretably get with some interviewers. But if you project yourself with an air of maturity and professionalism, then that won't be a factor.

    (I had the same reservations at first because I kinda look young for my age -- I was 20 @ all my interviews but looked younger. It's not big deal really.) Good luck!
     
  7. The Fly

    The Fly Senior Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by matthew0126:
    <strong>I think if you are young you can't get around the first impression that you'll regretably get with some interviewers. But if you project yourself with an air of maturity and professionalism, then that won't be a factor.
    </strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">NOT IF YOU'RE 13 YEARS OLD!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :D
     
  8. Hero

    Hero Senior Member

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    i think i'd be okay if you have your mom's signature
     
  9. jot

    jot

    i'm pretty sure my mom will sign for me. but then again, shes also applying to medschool ... premed competitiveness and all. <img border="0" title="" alt="[Frown]" src="frown.gif" />
     
  10. none

    none 1K Member

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    It's been my impression that MD/PhD adcoms are much more forgiving of a super-young applicant than are MD only ones. They know that regardless of what age you are when you enter...you're going to be one of the oldest in your residency program.
     
  11. Taty

    Taty Senior Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by The Fly:
    <strong>There was a thread here a couple of months back about a 17 (yes, seventeen at graduation) year-old-who graduated from Sinai a few years back and who's now in his Optho residency somewhere in NYC. . .

    He finished NYC in two years, graduated when he was 13 and then began medical school where he finished in the usual four years.

    Now that's WAAAAAAAAAAY too young -- that poor kid will probably burn out at thirty after having had no childhood. I think that is absolutely depressing. . .</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Rumors...nothing was like that at Sinai, and does it even possible?
     
  12. nap

    nap Member

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    I dont think that 19 is considered incredibly young. And as long as youre not like 15 or something...I really doubt that theyll even notice.

    What are the chances they actually pay attention to that year that you were born, assuming you did high school and college each for four years
     
  13. GrandMasterB

    GrandMasterB Big Poppa Pump

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    I just asked some third years, and they have never heard of anything like that at sinai. On a related note though, a while back one of my disant (very distant, and not by blood) cousins graduated from some med school in ny when he was 15 or something. my mom said that he was on 20/20 etc.
     
  14. The Fly

    The Fly Senior Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Taty:
    <strong> </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by The Fly:
    <strong>There was a thread here a couple of months back about a 17 (yes, seventeen at graduation) year-old-who graduated from Sinai a few years back and who's now in his Optho residency somewhere in NYC. . .

    He finished NYC in two years, graduated when he was 13 and then began medical school where he finished in the usual four years.

    Now that's WAAAAAAAAAAY too young -- that poor kid will probably burn out at thirty after having had no childhood. I think that is absolutely depressing. . .</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Rumors...nothing was like that at Sinai, and does it even possible?</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Rumors. . . I don't think so. :p

    Here's the article-- do a search on Lexis-Nexis if you'd like:

    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif"> From the Boston Herald <strong>
    Copyright 1995 Boston Herald Inc.
    The Boston Herald

    May 17, 1995 Wednesday SECOND EDITION
    SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 001
    LENGTH: 401 words
    HEADLINE: Teen doc headed to Hub
    BYLINE: By Michael Lasalandra

    BODY:
    Doogie Howser, M.D., is coming to Boston.

    The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary has confirmed that 17-year-old Balamurali "Bala" Ambati has been accepted to a four-year residency in ophthalmology starting next year.

    The gangly New York City teen-ager who just got his driver's license last week will graduate Friday from New York's Mount Sinai School of Medicine, becoming a full-fledged medical doctor. He is the youngest ever to graduate from medical school, according to the American Association of Medical Colleges.

    Ambati will not be coming to Boston directly, however. He will first do a one-year internship at North Shore University Hospital on Long Island, N.Y.

    At an age when when most kids are busy dealing with acne, Ambati spent two months on the trauma team of a hospital emergency room in Queens, treating gunshot wounds and stabbings.

    The young doctor-to-be moved to the United States from his native India at age 3, finished two elementary school grades each year and graduated from high school in Baltimore at age 11.

    That year, he also wrote a book on AIDS with his then 17-year-old brother, Jayakrishna, which won an award from the American Medical Association.

    Ambati graduated magna cum laude from New York University and entered medical school at 14.

    The teen-age phenom, who said he made a conscious effort to become the youngest-ever medical school graduate, likes to spend his spare time playing basketball, chess, ping pong and watching the TV show "E.R."

    Ambati said he picked Massachusetts Eye and Ear, a Harvard Medical School teaching hospital, for his residency because "I've always wanted to go to the best."

    The boy wonder said he has only been to Boston once - for his interview at the hospital. But he said he was impressed with what he saw.

    "It seems very nice," he said.

    He said that his 6-foot frame often hid his age from patients, but some "found out through the grapevine after a few weeks. There was always a period of astonishment."

    But Ambati said he doesn't expect to encounter any problems because of his age.

    "I've found people to be very friendly and open-minded," he said. "I've had extremely positive interactions with all my patients. They don't seem to mind my age at all."

    The only thing he doesn't like is when people call him Doogie Howser, after the TV show about a teen-age doctor.

    "It's getting a little old," he said.
    </strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Anyone want to reevaluate their position on whether or not what I had to say was a rumor or not ?!?! <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" /> :D

    Seriously, this is totally true!
     
  15. brickmanli

    brickmanli Senior Member

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    Age doesn't determine competence. If you're a precocious 17-year-old, even-13 year-old, GO FOR IT! You will become a brilliant doctor, the only experience I have more than you was spent in a bar inebriated. I never understand people who blah blah about how you can't relate well with your peers if you're young, but so what, I think it's a bunch of hogwash and due to professional jealousy. If you go to medical school six years earlier, imagine how much more money you'd be making!
     
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  17. The Fly

    The Fly Senior Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by brickmanli:
    <strong>Age doesn't determine competence. If you're a precocious 17-year-old, even-13 year-old, GO FOR IT! You will become a brilliant doctor, the only experience I have more than you was spent in a bar inebriated. I never understand people who blah blah about how you can't relate well with your peers if you're young, but so what, I think it's a bunch of hogwash and due to professional jealousy. If you go to medical school six years earlier, imagine how much more money you'd be making!</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">NO NO NO --

    What about having a childhood / adolescence? What about a first kiss? Dating?

    All of this is VERY IMPORTANT to your emotional/social development, ALL of which will be totally distorted and hampered by skipping a major portion of your life. . .

    How can you say someone is ready for medical school when they've never even had a first kiss or held somebody's hand (to be sure, these things aren't obviously relevant, but c'mon -- it is indicative of a total lack of proper emotional development).

    You could never convince me that 6 extra years of salary is an appropriate trade for skipping your youth. . .
     
  18. brickmanli

    brickmanli Senior Member

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    There are plenty of regular people who never had those experiences, and they go on to medical school and nobody says anything. In an age of promiscuity, they probably had sex by the time they're fifteen, so your point about first kiss and dating is irrelevant. Adolescence is so overrated. Three fourths of it is unnecessary torture and a complete waste of time. If someone is able to skip it, why not? Every time I hear about a precocious individual, it's always about the failures and pressures and loss of innocence, but it's just the media's preoccupation with exceptions. You know what, maybe we can learn a thing or two from a person like jot.

    The six extra years of salary is just a perk of making the best use of his life.
     
  19. Ryo-Ohki

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    If the kid is self-motivated then more power to him.

    If the kid is in the least pushed by his parents then his parents should be slapped on the side of their heads.
     
  20. Original

    Original Ogori-Magongo Warrior

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    jot,
    Not a problem at all. Just as none mentioned, you'll be at absolutely no disadvantage especially since you're applying MD/PhD.
     
  21. Brahms2010

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    .
     
    #19 Brahms2010, May 11, 2010
    Last edited: May 11, 2010
  22. lanashif

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    I have a question regarding age as well. I'm thinking about applying to some BS/MD programs, so I would be around eighteen when I applied. However, I was also thinking about skipping a year or two of high school because, honestly, I feel like it is a waste of time. Do you think that this would be considered too young, especially since I will be skipping two years of undergrad as well?
     
  23. flip26

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    Huh? Why did you tack your question on to this thread?

    How old are you now if you are "thinking about" skipping one or two years of high school? Are you already in high school?

    You don't need a high school diploma to go to college. Just have to find a college that will admit you, and community colleges do it all the time, and I know of many instances at 4 year colleges where kids as young as 13 have been admitted.

    As far as the BS/MD programs, those are extremely competitive and it seems highly unlikely that you could worm your way into one of those without completing high school first.
     
  24. Chops369

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    Well you're just a regular ol' Doogie Houser, aren't ya?
     
  25. JokerMD

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    i personally feel that age is one of those important factors in the application process. the older you are (even if its just one or two years post-undergrad) the higher your chance of acceptance. This is just something ive noticed....one of the lamer aspects of the application process IMHO
     
  26. chibrown01

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    I was 19 during interview season. A few schools told me that my age hurt me. Just because they feel I may be immature and try didn't want me to burn out fast. So they rejected me and told me to reapply in 2 cycles. Lol.

    This may be discrimination but they r right. My sister graduate with me too and she applied at 17. She was told the same thing so she applied to phyc phD programs and got accepted. It's life, med schools want ppk with experiences and us younger ppl usually don't have as many experiences as older folks.
     
  27. Dr McSexy

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